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Trouble with PnP


#1

Hello, I am trying to transfer a design to a sheet of Sterling using
PnP, but it does not work. I am at a loss because I have done this
many times before without serious problems. I am using a Canon
printer (it is perhaps 3 or 4 years old) with the typical ink
cartridges to photocopy the design onto the PnP. I read that some
printers do not work for PnP. Could the ink be the problem?

Thanks in advance.
Leach


#2

Transfer the ink to the sheet using acetone…should work.


#3

Leach,

You need to use a laser printer or photocopier that uses a carbon
based cartridge of ink. Ink jet printers will not work on the PnP.

I have two Canon printers, one is an inkjet, and the other laser. I
tried it with the inkjet printer and it was a total failure, whereas
when I used the laser printer, it worked just fine.

It is the carbon that provides the resist.

Alma.


#4

You mention ink cartridges, PNP needs to be done with a laser
printer or xerox type photocopier not an ink jet printer.

Jim

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#5
I am using a Canon printer (it is perhaps 3 or 4 years old) with
the typical ink cartridges to photocopy the design onto the PnP. I
read that some printers do not work for PnP. Could the ink be the
problem? 

Must be a toner based copier or printer to work. So a laser printer
would work, but not an ink jet.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com


#6

Needs to be a laser printer. Also you don’t need to use pnp paper to
transfer a design. Again using a laser printer, print your design
onto a glossy magazine page and then iron onto your silver, (make
sure the silver is very clean). If you do things correctly you have
a very fine resist for your etch. I use this method for electro
etching.

Chris


#7

Hi Leach,

I am using a Canon printer (it is perhaps 3 or 4 years old) with
the typical ink cartridges to photocopy the design onto the PnP. 

That’s precisely your problem. You’re using ink. You need to use a
laser printer or photocopier, as it’s the plastic particles of the
toner which create the resist for etching. Ink won’t work with PnP.

I hope you manage to find a printer/copier to make it work for you.
I’m currently using a big laser printer which my husband bought when
I was teaching, about seven years ago. He’s keen for me to find an
alternative, so that we can get rid of the huge printer as it takes
up so much room, and my occasional etching is the only thing we use
it for now. Yesterday, one of my last sheets of PnP got jammed in the
printer, and almost melted itself to the drum, so I am keen to find
an alternative too. Someone mentioned recently that you can use
ordinary photo quality paper, but I’d like to know how you’re
supposed to neatly remove the paper from the silver, leaving the
design behind, as I can’t see it being as clean as PnP. I think it
was also mentioned (and my husband had heard somewhere too) that
there are now some inks which can be cured with UV light to work, and
used with photo paper, but I don’t know anything about that. But as
far as I know, you can only use toner based machines for PnP.

Helen
UK


#8
He's keen for me to find an alternative, so that we can get rid of
the huge printer as it takes up so much room, and my occasional
etching is the only thing we use it for now. 

How big is acceptable? The Brother HL-2170 is 6.7 x 14.5 x 14.2
inches and can be found at less than $90.00. There may be smaller
ones.

Al Balmer
Sun City, AZ


#9

If you are using an ink jet printer, that is the problem. You must
use a laser printer (or copier) with carbon-based toner.

Jann Greenland


#10
It is the carbon that provides the resist. 

Actually it is the wax in the toner not the carbon that provides the
resist the carbon is just there as a pigment. The wax/pigment powder
is fused to the paper by heat.

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#11

Helen, There is a nice alternative for your large laser printer. I
have a small (laser) Samsung ML-2510 that is very portable because it
only prints black ink. I easily store mine in on a closet shelf when
not in use, and the cost is about $100.

I use mine to make laser prints on overhead transparency film which
becomes the “film” to expose an etching resist product called
Imag-on. It is a replacement for P&P and you use the ultra-violet
light produced by a household CFL fluorescent bulb (250 watt
equivalent) to expose the Imag-on resist sandwiched with your “film.”

The Imag-on is adhered to your silver or copper metal by using a
squee-gee and water, and after exposure to the light you put it in a
developer of washing soda and water.

The plastic resist that adheres to the metal is stronger than P&P
(lasts longer in the etching solution) and retains finer detail. And
it is certainly much easier to apply–no hot iron and no wondering
how long to heat the art. The “film” art you used to expose the
Imag-on can be reused for other pieces because it is not damaged in
the exposure.

Imag-on was developed for the print-making field, so most places
that carry it give instructions for exposing large sheets (for making
larger prints) and they need more complicated vacuum frames and
expensive light sources. Coral Schaffer at enamelworksupply.com
translated the process to the smaller size and simpler procedures
that we can use for jewelry size pieces of metal and her detailed
instructions make the product very easy to use. She sells a small
piece and sends along the modified instructions.

I have been doing a lot of electo-etching of fine silver for
enameling and have really liked it. Let us know if you try it.

vera


#12

Have you transferred designs with this printer before? You need a
laser printer for your design on PnP to work.

Sandra Graves


#13
How big is acceptable? The Brother HL-2170 is 6.7 x 14.5 x 14.2
inches and can be found at less than $90.00. There may be smaller
ones. 

Be warned, Brother laser printers are known to not work with toner
transfer (PnP etc). Something about their toner is different than
other printers.

m


#14

You didn’t indicate if your Canon printer is an inkjet or laser. If
inkjet, that is the problem. You have to use a laser printer (i.e.,
dry toner).


#15

Vera,

Thank you SO much for offering an alternative to PnP Blue for
etching. I just told my husband what you said, and he pointed out
that if it’s the product he’s thinking of, you wouldn’t need to use
a laser printer, and you could instead use an inkjet printer to print
onto inkjet transparencies, then develop it onto the Image-on with
the UV light. Is this correct?

Incidentally, I couldn’t find the article you mentioned on the cited
website. Thanks very much for your help in this. I will definitely
look into it further.

Helen
UK


#16

Vera,

thought you might like to know about this source for the film you’re
using.

http://www.thinktink.com/products/Photoresist.asp

I think it’s a tiny bit thicker than Imageon, which should mean it
has more resist value. Their M115 film is the lowest priced /sq in.
that we’ve found. Works exactly like Imageon and the Puretech film
here

http://www.capefearpress.com/puretch.html

Frank Fritzges


#17
Be warned, Brother laser printers are known to not work with toner
transfer (PnP etc). Something about their toner is different than
other printers. 

Hmmm… Yes, from the Techniks web site: “Note: We are getting
reports that PnP is not working well with later model Brother brand
copiers and laser printers We will keep you informed of any
discoveries” http://www.techniks.com

But I’m sure there are other small, inexpensive printers available.

Al Balmer
Sun City, AZ


#18

Hi Al,

How big is acceptable? The Brother HL-2170 is 6.7 x 14.5 x 14.2
inches and can be found at less than $90.00. There may be smaller
ones. 

Thanks for the recommendation. I suggested it to him, but he says
although our printer takes up so much room, we already own it, so it
would make sense to keep it until it dies, rather than spending
money on a new, albeit smaller one. I think he was hoping to find an
alternative where we could use his super dooper inkjet printer -
maybe the Image-on system would suit, as suggested by Vera. To be
honest, there are so many other tools that I could do with spending
that money on. My ultrasonic blew up the other day!!! I really miss
it. Thanks for the info though - it’s always appreciated.

Helen
UK


#19
http://www.capefearpress.com/puretch.html 

Yes, that’s the stuff, Helen. I haven’t tried it yet, as it looks
like a pain to apply and PnP works for me.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com


#20
Incidentally, I couldn't find the article you mentioned on the
cited website. Thanks very much for your help in this. I will
definitely look into it further. 

It may be sold here:

http://www.graphicchemical.com

and I may have a link to a site that shows how to use it on my blog
somewhere, there’s a search function and it would be in the Sources
category. Sorry I can’t look it up right now, I’m procrastinating on
my real work as it is,

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com