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#1

Can anyone tell me how electric tacking/welding effects the
crystaline structure of white gold alloys?

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#2

Now that the GemNet website is getting a regular 3000 hits a week we are
preparing to launch it’s new Visual Trade Supply Guide and Commodity
index.

Wanted Immediately
Feedback, read on this new service is bound to prompt questions
which we will be happy to address. We welcome your comments and
suggestions as to how this service can best opperate to serve you.

Like all good things on the InterNet it needs input from the user and critical
mass - if it falls over then it is because the market can not be bothered to
locate the best product to meet it’s needs.

Free Offer
In order to get the ball rolling, we are offering FREE space for a year to the
first users who want to promote there product and stake their claim. See below.

This is how it will work:-
Imagine you need to secure a diamond anniversary ring for a client, or maybe
you are just looking for a new source of supply or checking the market for
new lines or trends.

First visit the GemNet Supply Guide opening page which will be at
http://www.gemnet.co.uk/supply_guide

Click on the jewellery image from the different goods on show, jewellery,
watches, gifts, tools, jeweller’s sundries etc etc etc.

Click on the image of a ring from the pictures of different jewellery on show
and that will take you to the next page which will show images of ring types,
click on the picture of an anniversary ring and the next page will offer you a
range of anniversary rings to choose from.

Click on the ring that takes your fancy and reveal it’s full specification and
details from diamond weight to type and cost. Click the E-Mail button to
actually order the piece directly from the supplier, or request the supplier to
contact you or request a catalogue showing more of the supplier’s product.

There will be no charge to use the service.

To get your company and it’s products into the supply guide is also simple.

Send an E-Mail to GemNet with an image file attached (not included,
attached and preferably packed by pkzip). Your E-Mail should contain details
about the product and your company.

To feature a product for a year will cost just 20 English Pounds and that will
include the coding required to attach product details and your own E-Mail hot
button. Each product category will be rotated on a regular basis to ensure
that all products have equal time at top of page. Contributors will be able to
add images to the guide at anytime thru’ the year.

Stake your FREE claim now, send us your E-Mails and attached images.
Maximum 3 per company and no composite images please, single items only.

Let’s hear from you all.

Best Regards

Clive Billing

  •                     orchid@ganoksin.com                                        *
    
  •                   http://www.ganoksin.com/                                     *

#3

Hi
I’m new to the board and a serious partime goldsmith. I have been looking
for a supplier of a precision gauge filing block. I finally found a
supplier, Carl Fischer and faxed them twice with no reply. I noticed some
members of this list have mentioned their name before. How does one
communicate with them is it strictly by mail?

sross
Steve Ross, Executive Director,
Michiana Free-Net


#4

I’m new to the board and a serious partime goldsmith. I have been looking
for a supplier of a precision gauge filing block. I finally found a
supplier, Carl Fischer and faxed them twice with no reply. I noticed some
members of this list have mentioned their name before. How does one
communicate with them is it strictly by mail?
Steve Ross, Executive Director,

Frei and Borel in San Francisco and Oakland carry this item.

Frei and Borel
119 - 3rd Street, Oakland, CA, 94607, USA
510-832-0355

Brain Press
Box 1624, Ste M
Calgary, Alberta, T2P 2L7
Canada

tel: 403-263-3955
fax: 403-283-9053
Email: @Charles_Lewton-Brain


#5

I purchased a bench grinder for polishing about a month ago. It
works great, but I spend more time on the floor looking for my
pieces than I do polishing. (snipped)
Thanks, Candy

Hi, Candy:

One of the things that drives me absolutely nuts about this forum is not
being able to determine the precision of the language used. If you really
purchased a “bench grinder” for polishing, then it’s obvious you’re using
the wrong piece of equipment. True bench grinders rotate at a hellacious
speed and, if used for jewelry polishing, are very dangerous.

If what you really mean is that you have a piece of equipment designed
specifically for jewelry polishing, then it would be helpful to know what
brand, what size wheels, what type of buffs (muslin, felt, leather, etc.),
what type of polishing agent, and so on.

I’m sorry if this sounds “picky,” but it’s hard to give street directions
unless you know what city you’re in. The advice given by several others is
excellent: use the bottom third of the wheel, hold on to the item being
polished lightly (to avoid injury if it is snatched out of your fingers),
use finger cots – the suggestion of rubber inside leather is excellent, and
Plan Ahead. Don’t allow sharp edges of a piece to dig into a wheel, and
polish chains by first wrapping them around a length of broom handle or
something similar, making sure the ends are grasped firmly in your fingers
or, best, are tightly thumb-tacked to the wood. Chains can be really nasty
and dangerous if things Go Wrong.

I’m no great expert (I just repaired a piece that got smacked by the Buff
Deity), but the reason I was able to repair it instead of scrap it is
because I took someone’s suggestion to cover the area under the wheels of my
polishing machine with a piece of old carpet. That way, even if things get
whanged, they suffer minimal damange and don’t usually become UFOs. And I’m
told that after prolonged polishing the carpet piece can be pulled out,
burned in a clean metal bucket, and the residue can be sent off to the refiners.

Good luck,

Rick Martin
MARTIN DESIGNS


#6

From: Candyce05@aol.com
Subject: Polishing

I purchased a bench grinder for polishing about a month ago. It
works great, but I spend more time on the floor looking for my
pieces than I do polishing. (snipped)
Thanks, Candy

Hi, Candy:

One of the things that drives me absolutely nuts about this forum is not
being able to determine the precision of the language used. If you really
purchased a “bench grinder” for polishing, then it’s obvious you’re using
the wrong piece of equipment. True bench grinders rotate at a hellacious
speed and, if used for jewelry polishing, are very dangerous.
Big Snip

RICHARD AND OTHERS,

We use a jewelry buffer that spins at 3,600 rpm (as fast or faster than
most any bench grinder) so I do not understand your comment about a fast
grinder being the wrong piece of equipment. I should think that a grinder
may work pretty well, and not cost as much as a “jewelry” buffer.

Isn’t it grand that we all don’t have to think alike or use the same equipment.

John

John Dach and Cynthia Thomas
Maiden Metals
a div. of Strength of vision is important,
MidLife Crisis Enterprises but so is the ability
PO BX 44 to see things as they really are.
Philo, CA 95466
707-895-2635(phone/fax)
@John_Cynthia_MidLife


#7

Nancy:

Don’t know if this will help but there is a place in San Antonio
that is a authorized service center for foredom and dremel. Their
address and telephone number is Lone Star Technical Services

              18415 Fifth Street
              San Antonio, Texas 78266
              Phone 800-223-4936

They also service ultra-sonic machines and other jewelry tools.
I have not used them before but they seem to be a reasonable
service center. Hope this helps.

                               Ron

#8

Aqua aura hounds, I get my aqua aura from Washington gem and
Mineral ! Their phone number is 1-800-827-0639. Tammie


#9

The Florida Society of Goldsmiths will be giving a workshop on
knife making by Tim McCreight this summer see
http://www.wp.com/fsg


#10

Artist: Richard D. Hamilton

Email: dunstan@vineyard.net

Orchid Gallery: http://www.ganoksin.com/orchid/rick2.htm

Work by Richard D. Hamilton - Page 2

The following items were added:

o 22k 18k pt pendant w/moonstone, sapphhire, diamond, tahitian pearl

o Black opal sapphire ring

o 18k tahitian pearl and diamond ring

o 22k platinum wave ring

The Orchid Gallery is the visual front of the Orchid list. It is

here where we show each other with our creations. Send us your

entry as an Email attachment to service@ganoksin.com [Lapidary,

gem cutters and gem carvers are also welcome to participate!]

http://www.ganoksin.com/orchid/gallery.htm


#11

Larry, Mahogany obsidian is common to Oregon’s Glass Butte as

well as other Oregon sites. It can probably be found elsewhere,

I’m not sure where. I don’t know how it is formed, maybe someone

else does? Hope this helps, Mark Williams You can see a picture

of some at the following URL:

http://www.spiritone.com/~tfish/glassbu1.jpg

MS Sans SerifFrom: “0000,8000,0000Phoenixe@csranet.com” <<0000,8000,0000phoenixe@csranet.com>

MS Dialog Light Larry-this sounds like some material that I obtained from a

prospector our of Novia Scotia. He called it Northern Lights.

He has the rights to 15 different mines and this was from one in

Alaska. I purchased 5 cabs from him. He said he first called it

obsidian, but it was pointed out to him that true obsidian was

opaque where part of this looks more like smoky quartz or

polished Apache Tears with mahogany in some of the pieces. jb 0000,8000,0000MS Sans Serif

From: “GAIL SELIG” <<0000,8000,0000roesh@itw.com>

MS Dialog Light Larry, is this like labradorite? Gail


#12

Mark - i’ve been doing some work with iron and precious metal
for a few years and the search continues for techniques and
materials. the easiest iron to use is wrought iron or pig iron,
which are low in carbon. the higher the carbon content the harder
it becomes. Steel has a high carbon content, amongst other
alloys. unfortunately low carbon iron is hard to find. it was in
greater use in the 19th century…so finding samples of old rods
and train tressels is a prime source. searching through old scrap
yards or antique tool shops are a must. a wealth of knowledge can
be gained by studying ancient japanese tsuba (sword guard
manufaturing). the craftsmen developed unique techniques and
design abilities utilising iron and inlaid materials. they are
pretty closed mouth about their methods and therefore the best
source of is books written by visiting european
craftsmen. i can recommend several if you’re interested. another
source of soft iron is old tsuba. there are some beautiful
patinas developed for tsuba, as well. jet-black satin finishes to
velvet purple blacks. unbelievable stuff. iron is fairly easy to
work with, with some functional design considerations. it is
worth the effort. i’d be interested to hear of your project. good
luck. kim-eric lilot.in an 86degree, san francisco indian summer.


#13

Spring has finely come to us in the land of 10,000 lakes. Good
Day to All. I’m going to say something hear that I hope will get
us back on track. This forum is the best. Just think how much it
cost when one goes to school and finds a prof. that you don’t see
eye to eye with? What do you do? Look I don’t see eye to eye with
all i see on this forum. I for one would like to see more (INFO
ON CNC) and no more sales talk. It would be cool to share this
info with others. I would like to invite Christian Grunewald, Fady
Sawaya, Dominic Ventura,and Doug. To join me in this. I don’t
know a damn thing about what in doing with my
rhino3d.bobcad.millmasterpro.or even my $ 4,000.00 milling
center. All I know is Im not going to give up. Dr.Aspler Thank
you I take my hat off to you. and to all that have made this a
good place to get and give info. We all have something to give
in one way or other.

Thank you.
William True Threlkeld III
ps Don I know you don’t I. You must know Norm Finn frock. Im the class
of 1974


#14

Sabine,

At Metalwerx, our agreement with customers is that the work is
insured to the door of our store, and once inside, our insurance
covers any merchandise in our cases, regardless if it is on
consignment or not. I don’t know who this gallery is, but it
sounds very suspecious. Why in the world would you agree to take
something on consignment and then not display it? We never take
items that we can’t display right away, unless there is an unsual
amount of stock, which is discussed thoroughly with the customer
before hand.

Sometimes work doesn’t move the way you had hoped and that can
happen. But we are honest with our customers and try to
communicate with them the best that we can. We pay them on time
and in turn our customers are very happy.

I would take your work out of there as soon as possible and save
yourself some potential grief.

-k
Karen Christians
M E T A L W E R X
416 Main St.
Woburn, MA 01801
781/937-3532
http://www.metalwerx.com/
@metalart

Current Artwork:


#15

Well it is hard NOT to get firescale with sterling. I’m doing everything
right when soldering: big bushy reducing flame, lots of flux, etc.

Upon discovering firescale, I’m having some success with repeatedly
annealing and pickling to do depletion gilding. And I’m finding that a
soft matte finish covers a lot of sins … :))

Cheers
Virginia


#16
   G'day; I can't think of any possible reason why any manufacturer
would want to go to the trouble of filling vehicle valves with
sodium! 

Sometimes used in supercharged racing engines, for cooling (exhaust
valves only.) You are very unlikely to find them in the rubbish at
the neighborhood garage.

Al
mailto:@Alan_Balmer


#17
   does anyone know of a digital camera that will scan in 35mm
slides?". 

I am currently using the Nikon Coolpix 950 digital camera which has
very good capabilities for close up focusing. With this camera, it is
possible to take a picture of a slide which is lighted from behind,
much in the same way that you would duplicate a 35mm slide with a
conventional camera.

My setup is a bit unconventional and probably more complex than
need
be, but I used what was at hand. I had a Polaroid copy stand which
holds the camera in perfect perpendicularity to the slide to be
copied. I have the slide to be copied positioned on a piece of flat
cardboard with an opening that conforms to the exact shape and size
of
the slide itself, plus a small amount for clearance. You need to
light the slide from behind, and for this I use a standard 100 watt
incandescent bulb inside a cardboard box. A piece of glass lies on
top of the box, and on top of the glass there is a sheet of drafting
paper which is translucent and which acts as a diffusion screen to
soften and disperse the light source. The slide is positioned above
this surface by about 10 inches because you don’t want the camera to
focus on the texture of the screen, which it will do if the slide lies
on the drafting paper.

With the slide in position as described, adjust the position of the
camera so that it fills the available picture area. This, as I sa;y,
is easily achieved with the Nikon 950, although maybe not with other
cameras.

Note: If you don’t have a copy stand, you will have to improvise a
method for holding the camera and the slide in perfect alignment (see
conventional slide duplicating accessories and adapt from there). The
light source itself is much less critical and should be easy to adapt
in any number of ways.

The resulting image will be good enough for record keeping purposes,
and you might get results good enough to post on the web, for example,
but don’t expect quality that you get from a proper slide scanner,
much less a slide.

Let me know if you would like to see sample of images taken this way.

Riccardo Accurso
Ricco Gallery of Contemporary Art Jewelry
125 W German St /PO Box 883
Shepherdstown, WV 25443-0883


#18

Subjecy [SG] Potassium Hydroxide
Sender: owner-orchid@ganoksin.com
Precedence: bulk

I am trying to find out the specific gravity of 33% POTASSIUM
HYDROXIDE. If you could help me it would be appreciated. Thanks Kerri.
email @Kerri_Robertson


#19

[Trivia] The World’s Biggest Cut Blue TopazFrom: Service service@ganoksin.com
Sender: @owner-orchid
Precedence: bulk
Reply-To: orchid@ganoksin.com

All;

You can see the picture of the Siam Akarmanee, and the proccess
involved in creating it by cheching
http://www.ganoksin.com/ftp/bluetopaz.zip

Photos - Copyrighted to Dr. Aphichart, The Topaz group of companies.

It was produced by Dr. Apichart from The Topaz group of companies.
http://www.topazgroup.com

best to all
Hanuman


#20

Listing all the do’s and don’ts for Tucson could take hours but here
are a couple:

  1. Subscribe to Colored Stone Magazine (same publisher as Lapidary
    Journal) so that you receive the Tucson Show Guide in advance. Then
    you can pour over it, make notes, and focus in on what interests you
    the most.

  2. Take lots and lots of business cards.

  3. Make several copies of your resale license to bring with you.
    Many wholesale-only shows will require it.

  4. Where possible, register in advance for the big wholesale shows
    (AGTA and GLDA in particular). This will save you waiting in line to
    register once you’re there � and the lines can be very long.

  5. Make your hotel, rental car and/or flight reservations now.

  6. Don’t expect to get to every venue (unless you’re staying for a
    week or more) and don’t be overwhelmed or intimidated by the magnitude
    of the event.

Good luck and feel free to contact me off-list with specific
questions.

Beth Rosengard