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Tinning


#1

hi calgang, tinning is a process where one coats a host metal
with tin (about 5-10 microns).

best regards,

geo fox


#2
     "tinning is a process where one coats a host metal with
tin" 

G’day; Whilst I agree that the above is perfectly correct, I
have also heard the word tinning to be associated with the
coating of metals with tin/lead solders, especially when
referring to preparing the surfaces of the two pieces of metal to
be joined. Also a facetor friend always refers to his laps as
’tinned copper’, but he coats the perfectly cleaned copper
surface with electrical quality tin/lead solder, and wipes off
the excess with a Fluxite cloth when still hot. He then rolls his
diamond powders into the ‘tinned’ surface after washing off
remaining flux with hot water. So the word ‘tinning’ can be taken
to mean two slightly different things. Confusing, ain’t it?
Cheers, –

        /\      John Burgess
       / /
      / /      Johnb@ts.co.nz    
     / /__|\
    (_______)  "New and Improved" appears in advertisements a

lot now. My experience of that is; ‘Half the value and twice the price’


#3

John Burgess…you’re right yet again. But to go one step
further, metals are coated with tin/lead or similar coatings as
rust protection. The cans that the farmer delivers his milk in
are coated in this manner and the process is known as tinning.

Gosh it feels good to be able to add to a John Burgess message
!!

Sol K.


#4

Hi Sol, As to the milk cans, steel buckets, and even automobile
fenders, could you mean galvanized?.

Regards,
Skip

Skip Meister
@Skip_Meister
Orchid Jewelry Listserve Member
N.R.A. Endowment &
Certified Instructor
in all disciplines
Certified Illinois D.N.R.
Hunter Ed, Instructor
ICQ 37319071


#5

Hi Sol, As to the milk cans, steel buckets, and even automobile
fenders, could you mean galvanized?.

Skip…My understanding from the people in New
Jersey who coat these milk cans is that the coating alloy is
closer to lead / tin solder, alltho I don’t know the alloy. I
have had the experience of using some components they coated for
me ( for some hi-tech electronic stuff ) and being able to solder
wires to them with 63/37 lead/tin solder.

Sol K.


#6
Hi Sol, As to the milk cans, steel buckets, and even automobile
fenders, could you mean galvanized?.

I have some French made cookware that is “tinned”. I definitely
has a different look than galvanized and I think that it was a
more frequent process years ago. It’s somewhat shinny and has
sort of “smeared” or wiped look. I’ve always been somewhat
reluctant to use the cookware; it looks as if the coating would
melt at fairly low temperature.

dennis


#7
   My understanding from the people in New Jersey who coat
these milk cans is that the coating alloy is closer to lead /
tin solder, alltho I don't know the alloy 

The milk cans I hoisted on the truck as a boy were galvanized
steel. I think you can be certain that no lead alloy is going to
be use to store milk. Lead-bearing solder isn’t even used in
plumbing any more.

Al
mailto:@Alan_Balmer


#8

Hi all, I’m assuming that the original question was “what is the
meaning of the term tinning.”?/

Definition:- The process of coating metals with tin by either
hot coating, immersion or electrodeposition.

In a nutshell lol.

Regards.
Neil George


#9

AFAIK, copper cookware that is “tinned” is exactly that, coated
with tin. There might be a little something else in the alloy,
but I think it’s really just tin. Given the way galvanized
oxidizes or patinates or whatever, I would be loathe to "tin"
something with a zinc alloy — I remember the stories about
soldering something galvanized and ending up with the zinc
shakes. Anybody got more precies info in this??

Roy


#10

Roy, before I had to cut back a few years ago I did a good bit
of of welding on galvanized steel. There are 2 basic kinds of
galvanized coating that I have seen, the first being dipped in
zinc and the second electroplated. The electroplated is really
bad news because much of it (even drinking water pipes of the
kind imported from China and Mexico!!!) is cadmium undercoated
then zinc is coated on top of the cadmium. A quick test for
cadmium is to burn a test hole into the pipe (or other piece)
with your acetylene torch. If it forms a yellow oxide coating at
any time during the heating process then it contains cadmium. The
thinner the cadmium undercoat, the quicker it vaproizes off and
the yellow dissappears to leave the white zinc oxide so don’t be
fooled if there is just a little bit of yellow! Cadmium is found
as an antirust coating also on ‘bright’ carpenter’s nails and on
automotive engine parts.

Here is the catch. Cadmium vapor and cadmium oxides are deadly
poisons, damaging the heart and other important body parts. Zinc
vapor produces a lesser poisoning called metal fume fever that
feels like the flu, but it isn’t as dangerous as cadmium
poisoning.

I usually use a breathing mask rated for metal fumes now when I
weld. These masks are more expensive than regular dust masks but
are worth it. Plus a fan really helps particularly on a hot day
to keep the smoke out of one’s face shield.

Geo.


#11

A tinned surface melts at about 400-500 degrees farenheit, this
is conciderably above the temperature of boiling water, but not
below the tempeture of very burning oil or grease. It is a great
old technique to keep a pan from sticking, but not nearly as
efficient as the great invention of teflon.

Best wishes,
Etienne Perret
www.etienneperret.com