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Tigertail; [Was: - Ms. Terrill ]


#1

Hi Folks,

I second Wayne’s suggestion for tigertail. Tigertail for
stringing is available in several weights. Braided steel wire
with a plastic coating. I had a hard time getting knots to stay
until I read about melting the plastic at the knot. A lighter
flame at a minimum, or hot implement is even better. Seals the
knot! A pair of those clamshell bead tips finishes it off
nicely if not too heavy or you’re not using cones.

Not that I’m into beading, or anything… :wink:

Dave

Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com
http://www.sebaste.com


#2

Dave, I’m not into beading either, but I’ve had a request from a
family friend to re-string a necklace of venetian (sp?) cut
glass. I told her that I’d take a look at it and see what I
could do with it. Maybe the tigertail is what I should consider.

Thanks for any advice (from anyone.)


#3
  I'm not into beading either, but I've had a request from a
family friend to re-string a necklace of venetian (sp?) cut
glass.  I told her that I'd take a look at it and see what I
could do with it.  Maybe the tigertail is what I should
consider.

I personally prefer Acculon or Softflex. Both are as strong or
stronger than tigertail, but they are more flexible and less
likely to kink and cause lighter-weight beads to be mis-aligned.
Both are advertised in Lap Journal, Ornament, Bead and Button and
such. Terri Dubinski


#4
Dave, I'm not into beading either, but I've had a request from a
family friend to re-string a necklace of venetian (sp?) cut
glass.  I told her that I'd take a look at it and see what I
could do with it.  Maybe the tigertail is what I should consider.

Fishbre, I used to do beading (in fact that’s how I started in
jewelry). Stringing on silk and knotting between each bead gives
a necklace the best flow. Silk is what I used – unless the
beads had rough edges around the hole. In that case, silk will
tend to fray with wear and you should probably use flex wire.
Flex wire is relatively new and is like tigertail in strength,
but is more fluid in movement where tiger tail is stiff. Also, if
tigertail kinks–and it will with wear-- the kink is permanent
which leaves the necklace with a most undesirable ‘v’ bend. Most
bead suppliers have flex wire in different sizes and colors too,
I think.

Nancy


#5

Hi Fishbre (and anyone else who’s interested),

I think that tigertail is best for short neclaces and chokers
and can sometimes be used for longer ones if you’re using rather
heavy beads. The problem with it is that , like monofilament
nylon, it has a mind of its own and will not “drape” at all. If
you want a beaded necklace with a graceful line, use silk.

Elaine (MoonStones)


#6

Hi Fishbre -

Just some thoughts on using tigertail for stringing from someone
who did that stuff many, many years ago. One of the things that
is important in stringing necklaces is to make sure that the
elements in that necklace are protected. Glass beads, if not
separated from each other, will rub against each other, get dull,
crack and lose any value they have, and cut the string holding
them together.

The best way to protect them is by knotting (doesn’t have to be
big ones) between beads - tigertail won’t do this. It’s plastic
coated wire. There are a number of fibers available for stringing
necklaces, including silk (not good for any glass that could cut
it), a number of silicon threads (that also come in many colors)
etc. Some people have used Kevlar threads ( the stuff
bullet-proof vests are made from); my favorite was always
upholstery threads. Very sturdy, very easily used and came in
many colors and weights. Do you have a local bead shop in your
town? They could give you advice & if you don’t really want to
do this project, probably could get someone to do it for you
easily. Good luck - Laura


#7

Fishbre - My experience with tigertail is that it eventually
gets brittle ( work-hardened?) abd will snap. This has happened
to me many times so I seldom use it anymore. I really prefer the
real threads as they stay flexible and lie well on the body. I
just bought some new stuff (for me) called Silamide. Comes in a
huge array of colors, doesn’t stretch , won’t break and lasts
forever - at least that’s what I was told. Anyone ever used
this? Let me know your opinion. I’ll do the same after I’ve
used it. Thanks everyone, Gini


#8

Hi Fishbre396,

I’ve found nothing better for heavy necklaces. For a light
necklace to hang and move naturally, even light gauge tigertail
is probably too stiff . For freshwater pearls, liquid silver and
light necklaces I use a synthetic bead cord. I wore a heavy
necklace strung on tigertail, consisting mainly of kingman
turquoise nuggets, every minute of every day for years, before I
had to restring it. It can really hold up to the weight and
daily wear.

Hope this helps!

Dave
Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com
http://www.sebaste.com


#9
    just bought some new stuff (for me) called Silamide. Comes
in a huge array of colors, doesn't stretch , won't break and
lasts forever - at least that's what I was told.  Anyone ever
used this? 

Who supplies this product? Thanks for all the


#10

Hi, Fishbre - I bought my silamide at a local (Clearwater, Fl.)
bead shop - not sure where she orders it. I bought a large spool
of white ( $6.95) with no manufacturer’s name on it. I also
bought a small card of wine color ($1.50) which has the name “The
BeadSmith” on it. Hope this halps a little. I knotted a strand
of white freshwater pearls and small garnets last night with the
wine color and was very pleased. Don’t yet know how it will
wear! Good luck! Gini