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[Tidbits] The House on the Finger

Oh … the tales that abound when the dizzying subject of matrimony
enters the mind of man. Add to these flights of fantasy the jeweler’s
incredible touch … and you truly have a bedtime story with which
to tuck the kiddies in at night. Move over Mary Poppins. Move over
Lon Chaney. And listen. Sh. You hear it? That light melody? That
tinkling among the stars? Yes. It’s the Wedding March. Here comes the
bride …

First and foremost among the cardinal rules that must be obeyed is:
Marry during a snowstorm. This is considered lucky. For those of you
living in the northeast … this is your weekend. Make the most of
it. However … be sure that his name does not begin with the same
initial as yours … else the luck of the snowstorm will go down the
tubes and you will be fated with ill luck forevermore.

You ever hear of “bundling”? It’s an old and quaint tradition. In
days of yore (17th century or so) in England, Scotland, Ireland,
Holland, Norway and more … a couple about to be wed were
encouraged to spend the night together in bed. But wait wait … you
of lascivious bents. T’warn’t nearly as delightful as might first
meet the ear. The couple was required to wear all their clothing.
And they were separated by layers of bedding. The girl laid on the
sheet … the boy between sheet and cover. No touchies. Near the bed
… a pair of iron tongs and an iron vessel. I know I know. This
conjures up horrific images. Actually … the purpose was this.
Should he make undo advances in the dark of night … she was to
pick up the tongs and bang the kettle mightily … sounding the
alarm and ensuring his passions would cool. Ain’t nuthin’ like a
pair of iron tongs and an iron vessel near your bedside to scare
the bejeebers out of a man. Shades of that lady Bobbitt come
prancing into the dark recesses of my mind.

There are endless traditions relating to the union of man to woman.
And there are endless pieces of jewelry made to symbolize these
unions. And lest there are thems amongst you wot thinks the
traditions are stranger than the pieces of jewelry … I am here to
set you all on the corrected course.

There was once a jeweler who thought it might be a great idea to put
a synagogue on a ring. Don’t ask me why. Inside the ring are
inscribed the words: Mazel Tov (Good Luck). It’s actually quite a
striking piece … this Jewish Wedding Band. Though I must say … I
wouldn’t want the woman wearing it getting angry with me and trying
to back-hand me while wearing it.

For those of you who are new to this thing called Tidbits…may I
direct you to my home page at www.tyler-adam.com where you will
scroll down the left side menu till you get to the area that says
Tidbits Graphics … and then click on the link that says: House …
in order to view a golden synagogue on a wide banded ring.

Benjamin Mark

    You ever hear of "bundling"? It's an old and quaint tradition.
In days of yore (17th century or so) in England, Scotland, Ireland,
Holland, Norway and more ... a couple about to be wed were
encouraged to spend the night together in bed. But wait wait ...
you of lascivious bents. T'warn't nearly as delightful as might
first meet the ear. The couple was required to wear all their
clothing. And they were separated by layers of bedding. The girl
laid on the sheet ... the boy between sheet and cover. No touchies.
Near the bed ... a pair of iron tongs and an iron vessel. I know I
know. This conjures up horrific images.  Actually ... the purpose
was this. Should he make undo advances in the dark of night ... she
was to pick up the tongs and bang the kettle mightily ... sounding
the alarm and ensuring his passions would cool. 

this is true. & since many families were all living together in
one-room houses, mom & dad were just a few feet away.

in my other life, i’m a historian…but having kids & being consumed
by other interests has eaten away a lot of what i remember. i just
quit my adjunct position in december!