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[Tidbits] Maison de L'Art Nouveau


#1

That movement known as The Art Nouveau exercised a decisive influence
in the 1980’s and early 1900’s and then died out with the coming of
the Great War… aka The War to End All Wars… aka WW1.

In the year 1896 an interior decoration shop opened its doors in
Paris. It was called the “Maison de L’Art Nouveau” and it was from
this shop that the Art Nouveau movement got its name. The name
applied to all the decorative arts including–among other
things–jewelry.

It was in this last area that the Art Nouveau movement best
personified the free-flowing features and curving lines of the
creations of the day. Among the most popular of motifs of that time
were butterflies… ethereal female faces… and of course…
dragonflies.

Ah… the pulchritudinous winged princess of the skies and rivers.
Ain’t she a kicker though. Catch her… and you are sure to be
married within one year. Fish by the riverside… and you will surely
see her coming to your aid by hovering over the water where your fish
are plentiful. Cast your line in her direction and you will feast
well
this very evening.

Enter William Morris. The father of the Arts and Crafts movement.
These are the words of a poem written by Walter Crane upon Morris’
death: “Woven in song and written in design”. It is a remembrance of
a great talent.

Among the items of jewelry William Morris created is a Dragonfly
Brooch. It has old European-cut diamonds along the body… cabochon
ruby eyes…with diamonds in the wings and blue-green plique-a-jour
enamel. It typifies the Art Nouveau era. Its estimated value: $14,000
in 1994. Not for the hoi polloi I’m sure. But if you happen to have a
job at AIG… but that’s another story for another time.

For those of you who are new to this thing called Tidbits…may I
direct you to my home page at www.tyler-adam.com where you will
scroll down the left side menu till you get to the area that says
Current Tidbits… and you will get to view a dragonfly made with a
craftsmanship that is to be admired by all.

And there ya have it.
That’s it for this week folks.
Catch you all next week.
Benjamin Mark