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Thumbler's Tumbler & O ring


#1

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An O ring secures the lid to the body on the Thumbler tumbler
model I have 

I appreciate the explanation, but I’m still confused. My tumbler lid
area has four parts: the rubber-covered metal inner lid, the metal
outer lid, a washer, and the knurled knob. Which one of these is the
O ring?

Thanks in advance!
Judy Bjorkman


#2

Hi Judy

An O-ring looks like a sturdy rubberband and if you cut it it is
usually quite round in crosssection.

They come in all sizes, diameter and crosssection wise, commonly
made of rubber but not as flexible as a rubberband.

Lortone rotary tumbler has one connecting the motor to the roller
axis as a transmission belt but no o-ring in the lid. From your
description it sounds like it’s that type of tumbler or canister you
have. Unless the rubber on your rubbercover inner lid is detachable
and does the work of an o-ring. It does work as a gasket though
o-ring or not.

Some vibratory tumblers have them in the lid as a sort of gasket. On
mine the washer holding the lid is not in best shape so put an
o-ring under that as well.

If you’re still unsure please email me.

michaela


#3
I appreciate the explanation, but I'm still confused. My tumbler
lid area has four parts: the rubber-covered metal inner lid, the
metal outer lid, a washer, and the knurled knob. Which one of these
is the O ring? 

Okay, then you don’t have a Thumler’s Tumbler. Thumler’s are usually
the red ones, the light blue ones are the ones with the lid that you
are describing. I don’t know the name brand. The lid on them drives
me nuts, but on the up side, the barrels never roll off.

Elaine

Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#4

Thanks to all of you who responded to my puzzlement about what an
O-ring is. I really do have an old Thumler’s Tumbler (these words are
still clearly printed on the frame, along with the notation that it
is a Model A; it is red) and it has no O-ring with the lid. Of course
it does have the O-ring that connects the motor with the rotary drive
shaft. My barrel does not leak, nor is it any more difficult to
assemble or disassemble than my Lortone. So, for me, the phrase
"O-ring" means the one connected with the motor!

Gratefully,
Judy Bjorkman


#5
then you don't have a Thumler's Tumbler. Thumler's are usually the
red ones, the light blue ones are the ones with the lid that you
are describing. I don't know the name brand. The lid on them drives
me nuts, but on the up side, the barrels never roll off. 

This sounds like a Lortone.

Jackie Truty
Art Clay World, USA, Inc.


#6

Having owned Thumblers Tumblers for years (I now use the big Raytech
units from Rio) I am somewhat familiar with them.

The bowl is mounted to the central shaft on top of a large washer
held in place by bolts and lock washers.

If by an O-ring you mean the rubberized gasket that keeps moisture
from exliting the the bowl where it mounts on to the shaft, this is
not difficult to remedy.

If the old O-ring has become damaged, or has corroded away, go to the
local hardware store and find a huge washer (large enough to hold the
bowl on). If the inside diameter hole is too big, no worries. Just
find a sturtdy second smaller washer that fits the inside diamter
hole, but overlaps nicely onto the larger diameter washer, center the
smaller diameter washer onto the larger diameter washer, apply Handy
Flux, and silver solder them together.

To provide a seal, get some old rubber gloves and cut gaskets from
the widest portion. The hole in the center should be about 1/2 the
diameter of the center shaft of the tumbler. Use several layers
between your newly fashioned washer and the bowl to provide a good
seal. Cut new gaskets and replace as necessary.

I like to use wing nuts with lock washers instead of bolts to tighten
the bowl down on the tumber base.

You can also ‘soup up’ your Thumblers Tumbler’ by adjusting the
counterweight on the bottom. The motor wears out faster, but
depending on the load and media, it can reduce cycle times.

Good luck!

Michael Rogers
M. M. Rogers Design
Albuquerque, NM