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Things I dont like doing


#1

Was: was opening watches

abilities of someone who is looking to paint watch faces just
doesn't make any sense. 
The original poster isn't looking to discover the magical world of
watchmaking There is a philosophy that I adhere to strictly. One
of the most important things in life to understand: If youdon't
like to do something make damn sure that you don't do it well. I
barely even know how watches work and that suits me just fine. 

Perhaps this isnt a good time of the year to open what might just be
a can of worms, but I guess most people have things to do they dont
like doing, Ive plenty!! I dont like cutting the grass, nor house
painting nor washing the car nor doing the washing up and lots of
other chores, Id much prefer to just make lovely things, however just
because I dont like doing chores, its doesnt follow that I will do
them badly, if I did Id just have to do them over, so its get on with
it do it well so it will not need doing quite so soon again. I hope im
not just the lone voice here on this subject.


#2

I’m sure that was intended light-heartedly! We all have plenty of
stuff we do out of necessity, but taking on things we don’t really
need or want to do becomes martyrdom. And who wants to be around a
martyr?


#3
just because I dont like doing chores, its doesnt follow that I
will do them badly, if I did Id just have to do them over 

While this is pretty much my attitude, I think the OP was half
joking, half making a valid point that it is easy to get tapped to do
things no one wants to do if you show ability and willingness.

My husband, on the other hand, is a master of “strategic
incompetence”. It didn’t take many times of mowing over the flowers
and around the larger weeds “because he couldn’t keep track of what I
wanted mowed and what I didn’t” before the lawnmower was added to the
list of tools he’s not allowed to touch.

The one and only time he decided he could fix the running upstairs
toilet, I had to replaster the dining room ceiling.

He’s great with a computer, though.

Merry Christmas, Happy New Year, everyone.
Noel (it’s also my birthday)


#4
...before the lawnmower was added to the list of tools he's not
allowed to touch 

Noel, that makes me think of the advice I give to guys (who ask for
it) who are about to get married. I tell them that we all have a
natural level of behavior, cleanliness and competence that we fall
to naturally. I suggest that for a time, after they are married,
they make an effort to consciously drop below that line. If they are
someone who always puts the dishes in the dishwasher and picks up
their dirty clothes, leave them in the sink and on the floor. You
know, do things you normally wouldn’t do like, talk with your mouth
full, swear too much, dress badly… Then your new wife can try to
change you and make you a better person. After a time you do
improve, she feels like she worked a miracle when you actually just
returned to you natural baseline of behavior. everybody’s happy!

Mark


#5

Merry Christmas and Happy Birthday, Noel!!!

Barbara


#6

Mark- There is an old saying I love. “Women marry men hoping that
they’ll change. Men marry women hoping they won’t.” -Jo Haemer.


#7
You too. I want to think that what you meant t say was "Be good at
everything, just don't let anyone know. 

Yes, a bit tongue in cheek butonly a bit. Years ago there was a
novelty song, what some call a “story song” that got lots of
mainstream airplay, called “Moose Turd Pie”. It was about a group of
cowboys on the trail - gnarly, crusty men, and the gist of it was
that whoever complained about the cooking became the new cook. So,
yadda yadda yadda song lyrics and this guy made a pie, hoping to lose
his cooking privileges, and then the last line is. “IT’S MOOSE TURD
PIE!!!” “It’s good though” Years ago when I was a goldsmith in a
shop in Hawaii they needed a polisher and they put me there. I banged
around, dropped some pieces, was painfully slow even though I’m
a most excellent polisher. Otherwise I would have been standing there
at that wheel to this day. They quickly decided it wasn’t my thing,
and put me back at the bench.


#8
Noel, that makes me think of the advice I give to guys (who ask
for it) who are about to get married. I tell them that we all have
a natural level of behavior, cleanliness and competence that we
fall to naturally. I suggest that for a time, after they are
married, they make an effort to consciously drop below that line. 

So, Mark, are you married, yourself? Happily?

Again, I’m sure this at least half in jest, but starting off a
relationship by cultivating dishonesty seems destined to be a
problem!

I have heard it said that a man marries a woman hoping she will
never change, and she does; a woman marries a man hoping he will
change but he never does.

Noel


#9
There is an old saying I love. "Women marry men hoping that they'll
change. Men marry women hoping they won't." 

Jo, an absolutely absolute statement. Loved it.

Kay


#10

So, Mark, are you married, yourself? Happily?.. Noel, it was tongue
in cheek. I’ve been very happily married for 34 years. She’s made me
a much better man. dramatically better than I would have been. Plus
she is absolutely the brains of the operation. All would be lost
without her. When we were teenagers, she’s the one who gave me the
courage to go and ask for an apprenticeship with a guy who turned out
to be a master goldsmith. Then ten years later, when we had three
young sons and an 1890 Victorian house that needed total
rehabilitation (by the two of us), she’s the one who encouraged me to
go off on my own and open my own shop. She is the center of all the
good things in my life. I do believe that she still considers me
a work in progress. :wink: Mark


#11
she's the one who gave me the courage to go and ask for an
apprenticeship with a guy who turned out to be a master goldsmith.
[snip] I do believe that she still considers me a work in
progress. ;) 

Yeah, I didn’t suppose you were really serious. congrats on the
happy marriage.

Though my marriage has its ups and downs, it was my husband (then
boyfriend) who said to me 40 years ago “Why don’t you quit studying
art history and go make some?” I did the first part, anyway!

We’re all works in progress, God willing.
Noel


#12

Wow, I am sorry I so miss judged you on your original advice. I think
that truthfulness is a really important part of marriage. I guess
that much of your original advice was tongue and cheek humor and I
missed it. Congratulations on the long marriage, may it last twice as
long.—


#13
..it was my husband (then boyfriend) who said to me 40 years ago
"Why don't you quit studying art history and go make some?" I did
the first part, anyway!... 

Noel, you made the right choice, I love your work! My wife (then
girlfriend) was the one who, when I was 18, encouraged me to apply
for an apprenticeship with a goldsmith by offering to work for free.
Telling them that I would work for a year for free if they would
teach me all I could learn. I think that was part of what persuaded
them to take a chance on me. and thankfully they paid me. I only
post that bit about offering to work for free because some people
just starting out might find it a useful idea.

Mark


#14

something I just came to mind. it works. After casting with stones in
place and cooled put the flask back in the vacuum under water and
revacuum the investment comes off almost by it self.? Don in Idaho


#15

Noel and Mark,

I also offered to work for free in order to gain the knowledge to
become a jeweler. My Mentor was a Master Goldsmith, who had put an
ad in our local newspaper for a silversmith apprentice.

I answered the ad and was told he couldn’t pay but basic wage and I
told him, I didn’t want any pay I wanted his knowledge.

I work with him for approx. 5 years, learning everything I could,
includinggemology and geology before he passed away from liver
cancer. After his death, I went to classes that were mentored by the
Mother Lode Mineral Society of Turlock, CA that were held at Modesto
Jr. College, where Ilearned Lapidary and more Silver and Goldsmith
techniques. Before I started working with my Mentor, I had worked at
creating circuit boards, teaching soldering and inspection of
electronic parts that went into the Hubble Telescope and etc.

I started off reworking my Mother’s costume jewelry for myself at the
age of 13. I am now a young 72, still creating jewelry for myself and
to sell. I also can repair costume jewelry which many turn up their
noses to, but when a person has a piece of jewelry that was loved and
worn by their GGGrandmother, to be able to restore that piece to its
original condition is very satisfying.

Without my Mentors benevolence I wouldn’t be where I am now.

I offer free Mentoring to anyone who wants to learn.

Veva Bailey