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Thick adhesive that will bond glass to glass


#1

OK All you Orchidians.

I need a thick adhesive that will bond glass to glass.

I am looking for an adhesive that is as strong as two part Epoxy
resin but does not require the mixing.What I love about Epoxy is that
it is super strong and very viscous, so it does not run.

I tried Jet Set jewelers superglue but it leaves a “frosty” film on
the glass. and it has a cyanide derivitive which doesn’t seem to
healthy in production work. I have tried E6000, but it is basically a
plastic glue,so it doesn’t hold. I need to be able to make a
permmanent bond as strong as if two pieces of glass were fused
together. I need the bond to set up in minutes if possible but will
settle for hours. IS silicone a good choice?

Someone suggested Hxtal epoxy but geez! Expensive and takes UV light
and takes a week, on a third Wednesday with a full moon,etc,…

Any experienced folks out there that can help?

Regards,
Andrea Streicher
Streicher Studios and A Beadable Feast
Original Sterling Silver and Fused Glass Jewelry
510-528-3755
www.strikerstudios.com


#2

Andrea Streicher: try the following

www.thistothat.com

Bob Goll
Independence, Ks


#3

andrea - if you don’t have that much to adhere you could try the glue
sold by auto supply shops for re-attaching rearview mirrors to
windshields - as to your application of E6000 not working - the
surfaces probably weren’t prepped enough since i’ve never had a
problem with it on glass to glass etc. ive


#4

Hi Andrea, If at least one of the pieces of glass is clear you can use
crystal clear made by the Duro company. This is a UV glue that takes
about 15 seconds to cure in sunlight. I use it all the time and I
think it is better than epoxy. Very strong and almost impossible to
get apart.

Mike
www.mijo-opals.com


#5

I am aquainted with a successful, professional glass sculpture artist
who uses nothing but UV activated glue to join his large pieces. If
it is applied correctly you cannot detect that there is anything
between two pieces of clear glass. The longer curing time for a glue
is also an indicator of a stronger bond. If you intend on using this
glue on a regular basis , you can purchase a uv activator light. But
you must wear eye protection. As with most things, all good things
come to those who wait and you get what you pay for.

For more info see: www.gluguru.com


#6
I need a thick adhesive that will bond glass to glass.

Silicone is what a lot of glass artists use. The guys I knew doing
construction with glass always required a silicone that was “pure,
100% silicone”. Apparantly, some silicone glues/caulks have other
compounds in them to suit specific applications. I’ve used it and it
holds real well. But have you tried that stuff you used to be able
to get in the auto parts store for gluing rear-view mirrors back on?
It too cures with UV, but I think it works pretty quickly. I used it
to glue the mirror back onto the old 82 Ford F150 about 4 years back
and it’s still holding, and that truck is a bone-shaker, especially
on these country roads. It comes in a tiny little tube, can’t miss
it. Of course, when gluing anything like glass, or any polished
surface, you better make sure it’s surgically clean. I’d wipe it
down with acetone (not nail-polish remover, industrial grade stuff).
Good Luck.

David L. Huffman


#7

Could you give more info on E6000, manufacturer, where it’s
available, etc. It’s totally new to me. Thanks KPK


#8

I have recently had problems with epoxy. Gluing silver to silver,
the glue stayed sort of squishy; the pieces did not hold. Cleaned it
off & re-did it twice; same results. Can weather effect the setting
of epoxy? ('twas veryveryvery hot) Or–could my mixing surface, the
bottom of a plastic water bottle, have contained some sort of oil that
hindered proper reacting? Any thoughts, anyone???


#9

I’ve recently found a product that you might be able to use. It’s
called “power poxy”. I purchased mine at its Wal-Mart. It cost
approximately $2.00 for half of fluid ounce. The stuff works really
well, almost as well as two-part epoxy does.

– Hint: If you are not a paypal member and would like to save $5 on
your purchase, then it might behoove you to go to my ordering page at
http://silverfoot.bizland.com/ordering.htm, click on the paypal link.
When you sign up for their service you get a $5 credit to your paypal
account. The service is easy and secure. More and more internet
vendors are using the service to accept payment.

Silverfoot-


#10

It sounds like you did not use enough hardener. As far as heat goes,
most epoxies will cure faster with heat.


#11

KPK: Our local craft store sells E6000 you might try one in your area.
Fire Mountain Gems sells it for 3.67 a tube or if you buy 4 or more
2.71. That is just one of the suppliers the list goes on…Rio Grande,
etc.

http://www.firemountaingems.com

Hope this helps.
Linda Crawford Designs
Willits, CA, US


#12
Can weather effect the setting of epoxy? ('twas veryveryvery hot)  

G’day; heating an epoxy resin makes it set very much faster. I mix
epoxy on a broken piece of window glass which I have cleaned with
alcohol or the ‘mixed solvent’ one can buy in paint and tool shops.
The presence of oil may retard the setting of epoxies. If I want the
job to set very quickly, I put it on a part of my bench when the sun
strikes it. Could your epoxy be from a bad batch? Cheers, –
John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ


#13

if you need info about glue and adhesives there is a great internet
sight… http://www.thistothat.com you just type in what materials
you’ll be putting together and it will give you a list of several
products which will do the job… thanks amanda