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Texturing silver


#1

hi i’m trying to find out how to recreate a finish that i have seen
on a collection of silver jewellery on sale here in the uk - it’s
called the ‘dazzle’ collection and can bee seen on the manufacturers
website - http://www.kitheath.com basically it is a glittery finish
produced by heavily randomly pitting/marking the surface of the
silver to give a rough ‘glittery’ finish. anyone got any ideas as to
how this is achieved?

any ideas would be gratefully received.

@sally1


#2

Could this be a pave effect created with a small faceted diamond in
a hammer handpiece tip? Foredom sells these for their hammer hand
piece and it produces an effect that may be what you describe.

Jesse


#3

Sally, If I picture it correctly, it sounds like the finish produced
by using a pointed tool in a hammer handpiece. There is a tip
available in which a small diamond is set inverted in a steel rod so
that the culet of the stone becomes the point. Inserted in a the
handpiece it is worked over the surface of the piece and produces
what one manufacturer refers to as a “pave”. finish.

Jerry in Kodiak


#4

Couldn’t pull the site up that you included, but I use a texture
that sounds similar. I get this by rolling coarse sandpaper throught
the rolling mill with my metal. It gives a nice shimmery finish.
Hope this is helpful - Sarah


#5
    hi i'm trying to find out how to recreate a finish that i have
seen on a collection of silver jewellery on sale here in the uk -
it's called the 'dazzle' collection and can bee seen on the
manufacturers website - http://www.kitheath.com   basically it is a
glittery finish produced by heavily randomly pitting/marking the
surface of the silver to give a rough 'glittery' finish.  anyone
got any ideas as to how this is achieved? 

I think that that is done by a “flywheel”. Its a bit that cuts small
sections of the surface metal off, and looks like a tiny marquise
shape. I know that Rio Grande in the US sells this, but I couldn’t
tell you of those in the UK. They are diamond coated and cost
about $50 a piece. Hope it helps.


#6

Frie and Borel in Oakland and San Francisco sell “German Texturing
Wheels” which are plastic hubs to which wires are hinged radiating
out from the center like a buffing wheel. The rounded tips of these
wires are what gives the “facetting” effect. Different guages of
wire are available for different results. Be sure to wear eye/face
protection.

Andy Cooperman


#7

Sally precisely this was the same question I used to make some time
ago and it took almost 7 years to find out what this manufacturers
use for this "pave"or “steeple” or "Lasser finish " or whatever.

First of all the diamond points did not work for the finish I wanted
no matter if I would increase the strokes in the hammer piece the
finish was still too superficial and what I wanted was a more rough
and like you say glittery finish so I have to go to the resort of
doing my own points with a triangular piece of well sharpened graver
with the triangular point polished to a bright finish. Initially I use
to attach the graver to a heavy tool like the ones gardeners use for
pooling out weeds in the gardens and use the thing like a small
heavy hammer but eventually I made a device to hold the graver in the
hammerpiece. Last week I saw a carbide point together with a diamond
point in one of my catalogs the carbide one leaves a deeper textured
finish . In fact the carbide point is way more expensive than the
diamond point. One thing I have learnt about this. No manufacturer is
going to tell you a secret about this finish and the
secret lies in how bright you can polish your graver Marco


#8

Sounds like it might be a texture using a hammer tool with a sharp
point. The hammer tool caused an up down stroke with the amount of
impact being adjustable. The silver is first polished then the tool
is used. It give the silver a grainy shinny surface.

Lee


#9
   hi i'm trying to find out how to recreate a finish that i have
seen on a collection of silver jewellery on sale here in the uk -
it's called the 'dazzle' collection and can bee seen on the
manufacturers website - http://www.kitheath.com   basically it is
a glittery finish produced by heavily randomly pitting/marking the
surface of the silver to give a rough 'glittery' finish.  anyone
got any ideas as to how this is achieved? 

Hi, This particular finish you are looking for is not done with a
diamond flywheel cutter. This is done using a pointed tool with a
tiny diamond set in the end… Imagine a Burr with the head cut off,
then setting a diamond in the tip… This tool is then used in a
hammer hand piece that attaches to a flex shaft such as a Foredom.
There are also air operated hammer hand pieces that work.

When the Hammer handpiece moves the tool up and down, the diamond
tip impacts with your work surface and creates very tiny rough
impressions that sparkles brilliantly… it takes a bit of time to
texture a surface with this method ,but well worth the effort …
And very costly in production as it is quite time consuming. This
makes a textured surface that no other tool can do…

These used to be available from various supply companies, But it is
fairly easy to make if you have some stonesetting knowledge and a
tiny diamond. I believe these used to cost $40- $80…, but can be
made by hand for only a few dollars and some labor. Daniel Grandi

We do casting ,finishing and a whole lot more for designers,
jewelers, and people in the trade. Contact us off list at
sales@racecarjewelry.com


#10

The catalog for the Foredom company shows diamond hammer points for
$19.50 and carbide points for $5.00. A standard hammer shank is
$3.50. These prices seem quite reasonable to me. If you want more
info call the company and request catalog #325 and price list #300.
You will find a large quantity of good items for our work in these
catalogs. Phone no. is 203-796-7861 or on the web at
www.foredom.com

Lewis F. Elrod, CFE
Silver Fox Gallery