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Testing jade?


#1

Ok guys I need some help

I have a large collection of antique jade bracelets and carved
pendents belonging to a client. I am trying to help him sell but I
have run into a problem, I have been told that some of it is quartz.

How do I test and tell the difference?

I do not want to sell it as jade if it is not.

Thank you for your help.
Lauren


#2

Define jade in your labelling/marketing and say why it in FACT meets
that standard. You could do the same to sell lapi lazuli or other
rocks honestly.


#3

You need a professional who really knows what they are doing. One
resource is someone I use, http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1vb

If you have something that is actually valuable you would be foolish
totrust anyone who is not an expert. Especially if they want to buy
it.

Richard Hart G.G.
Denver, Co.


#4
If you have something that is actually valuable you would be
foolish to trust anyone who is not an expert. 

First I’ll wholeheartedly agree with Richard, above. And since you
ask the question I’ll guess that you need an expert appraisal, also
since it’s a whole collection. Just for your own purposes - I want
to stress that I’m not saying you should appraise the lot yourself -
even fine jade has a waxy luster. Well polished quartz can and might
look like glass. Jade will have something of a look of finely
polished wood that’s hard to describe or explain. It’s the eye that
can see the difference that’s the expert. For many other jade
substitutes there is a simple test that you CAN do yourself.

Somebody showed me a “jade” figurine and said that Sotheby’s had
ID’d it as real jade. I took one look, literally said, “They’re full
of &%^” and pulled out my pocket knife. Sure enough, the blade bit
into the stone immediately. With both jade and quartz the blade will
skip across the stone like it’s ice. Most of the jade substitutes are
easily scratched, and you don’t have to scratch them - if the blade
wants to dig in, it’s not jade.

If it’s really a large lot, you need a pro. If it’s a large, fine
lot and you have pics, I have a friend who might be interested - if
so you can email me…John D.


#5

This is trickier than people are telling you.

There are two entirely different minerals that are jade, nephrite
and jadeite.

You’re going to have to find someone who truly knows their stuff.
Most nephrite is not particularly valuable, however antique nephrite
jade can be, despite the value of the material. Jadeite tends to be
worth more but there is no hard fast rule. So it’s not just a matter
of testing whether it’s quarz or jade.

You will need to find someone who knows not only the materials, but
also the workmanship.

What sorts of objects do you have?

Derek Levin


#6

Thank you all for your help.

I am still working this all out, it is a very large lot from the
1970’s. Many of you have asked what I have.

I have 100+ bracelets which I know that are jade. They have been
tested and looked at. There are 50+ carved pendents that I was told
are quartz by a jade wholesaler that was looking at buying the lot.
He was not interested in the carvings so he only checked a few of
them and I want to check the rest as the quality’s of carving and
material seem to have two different looks.

This person I sent them to to have them check and buy, offered very
little for the whole lot which I was surprised as the gold value in
the clasp/hinges was worth the amount he offered. Then on talking he
upped the offer but not enough and I asked him to send them back. Now
he is picking out a few pieces he want and sending me an all the
pieces back with and the offer so I can see what he has chosen and I
can make a dissension on if I want to take the offer or not.

This has been a very interesting learning experience.

All help and advice is useful.
Thank you
Lauren


#7

I learned the hard way, Lauren, that it is best to get an appraisal
from a qualified expert in whatever field first and pay the fee.
Then, after I know what I have, I can offer them for sale. Barbara on
a gorgeous day on the island when the kiln has been at work.


#8
This person I sent them to to have them check and buy, offered
very little for the whole lot which I was surprised as the gold
value in the clasp/hinges was worth the amount he offered. Then on
talking he upped the offer but not enough and I asked him to send
them back. Now he is picking out a few pieces he want and sending
me an all the pieces back with and the offer so I can see what he
has chosen and I can make a dissension on if I want to take the
offer or not. 

I wouldnt let him pick through them, demand that he send them all
back and then you can consider any offer for individual pieces as a
fresh transaction. I would be hard pushed to sell even then as I would
have lost confidence in the prospective buyers integrity.

Nick Royall