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Taurus Ring Saw


#1

Has anyone used the Taurus 2 Ring Saw for cutting metal for jewelry
work? How did it do?

J. S. Ellington


#2

Hi, I purchased a Taurus ring saw this year from Warner-Crivello for
$325 to use on sheet silver as I really hate to use a jeweler’s saw
in production items. I got the saw and set it up exactly as directed
even mounting the silver sheet on foam board for support. I turned it
on and it ate up my metal quickly and I found it hard to negotiate
tight turns without losing alot of metal, and it left the edges
horribly ragged. After using it for fifteen minutes or so, I realized
that it was not for me and called W-C in order to return it. They do
not accept returns even though I was willing to pay the 15%
re-stocking fee. I called several stained glass studios in my area
and one studio bought it from me for $240. Even though I took a loss,
I was really relieved to be rid of it as there seems to be alot of
maintainance involved and the blades are good for about 60 to 80
hours and cost about $65.00 to replace. This was my experience with
the ring saw if it helps
you! Suzanne


#3
 Even though I took a loss, I was really relieved to be rid of it
as there seems to be alot of maintainance involved and the blades
are good for about 60 to 80 hours and cost about $65.00 to replace.
 This was my experience with the ring saw if it helps 

The thing to remember about this saw, and others using diamond
abrasive as the cutting agent on the blades, is that these are not
really intended for metal. They WILL cut metal, but not as
economically or cleanly as a steel toothed blade. They take out a
wider kerf than steel saw blades, and don’t turn corners sharply
without cleaning out a good deal of the waste side of the cut, if
there is one. And a continuous blade cannot be threaded into a
blind hole in the sheet metal. These saws are designed and intended
for glass and lapidary work, at which they excell. I’ve not got a
Taurus, but another brand of diamond band saw, and about the only
times I use it on metal is for metals like titanium, which can be
difficult to cut sometimes, hardened steel or carbide too, are easily
cut with this, or times when i’m cutting through highly variable
hardnesses for some reason, like bimetalic or multilatered items,
where one or more layers causes trouble for a convetional saw blade.
If you DO use a saw like this on metal, be sure to use lots of
coolant. Metal causes faster wear on these blades than does cutting
stone.

If you’re doing metal cutting on a power saw, you’ll probably be
better served by a jig saw type arrangement. Rio used to carry one
called the Princeton Power saw. not sure if they still do, but it
wasn’t much different from high end wood working jig saws, other than
the blade clamps could use standard jewelers blades.

Peter


#4

I have one of the original Taurus ring saws… Cost me $750… I tried
to use it for cutting thin slabs of jasper and agate… What a joke !
It was VERY VERY VERY slow and the blade was too fragile to perform
any real work at all… I too was not able to return mine and it
has been sitting in the box since 1998…

I did try the saw on thin sheets of glass and it worked ONLY fair,
even on glass…

I would only consider the saw for extremely specialized
circumstances and special cutting jobs, it is NOT a general purpose
saw in my opinion…

If I had to do it all over again I would have invested in a good
band saw like a Gryphon model, or a Diamond Lazer 3000 or 5000 or
7000…

A reasonably priced saw for metal is called the Cuti Pi Scroll
saw… It comes in 2 versions, one is for metal and one is for
ceramics and hard rock materials… It too is a slow cutting saw, but
it may be better than the Taurus and the replacement blades are ONLY
10.00 each, but that blade cost is somewhat relative, to design…
The Cuti Pi saw is available through Alpha Supply, in Washington
State 1 800 257 4211

RocknLight


#5

Hi Gang,

If you’re interested in a saw that works well for sawing thin metal,
plastics, wood & similar products, take a look a the PROXXON scroll
saw, DS 115/E.

It’s a quality German made tool capable of sawing nonferrous metals
up to 2mm thick. It’s a variable speed saw that uses jewelers saw
blades. The head is adjustable, so that blades shorter than full
length can be used.

The saw sells for around $150 in the US. Two sources in the US
aRe: 46 Jewelery Supply (ringtools.com) in NYC & Gemstones Etc.
(@David_D_Arens2).

Sorry for the shameless plug, but it really is a good tool!

Dave


#6

A reasonably priced saw for metal is called the Cuti Pi Scroll saw…
It comes in 2 versions, one is for metal and one is for ceramics and
hard rock materials… I have and use the Cuti Pi saw for metals. It
cost around $400 several years ago. It does a good job of cutting
sterling and copper sheet, has adjustable speed and it uses jewler’s
saw blades. Donna in VA


#7

That is an interesting experience. I have been considering a
Gryphon Wire saw which is the alternate to the Taurus and has a
slightly different mechanism of action from what I’ve read, more
like a water sluiced scroll saw. Since I make glass objects as well
as jewelry, I thought it might serve two purposes which of course
would bump it up a notch or two on the priority list. Has anyone else
out there in Orchid-Land had experience with this type of saw? What
were the results? In Garland, Texas, I’m-already-waiting-for-spring.
Lynn Stimpson


#8

Many thinaks Peter, I really would like to do more sheet work, but
find that the time involved using a standard jeweler’s saw is too
much for production work and hard on my shoulders. I have considered
a RT stamping system from Rio, but the cost has held me back. Thanks
again for your reply, Suzanne


#9

I have had a Torus ring saw for over a year, and have learned how to
use it. I have done professional stone and custom jewelry for over 30
years. The Torus saw, lets me make cuts that would be almost
impossible by other means. I know there are other saws out there that
have band type blades, but my Torus works very well.

The key is that you cannot treat it like a trim saw. It’s not
designed for heavy use on thick slabs of rock. Treat it very gently,
cut slowely. Be careful to free up the blade before you start it up.
Yes I have broken a blade. It was part of the learning process. I use
this commercially with no problems. Take time to learn how to use it.

Richard Olson


#10
 I have been considering a Gryphon Wire saw which is the alternate
to the Taurus and has a slightly different mechanism of action from
what I've read, more like a water sluiced scroll saw.  Since I make
glass 

Hi Lynn, I have an old Gryphon I used to use for glass projects. It
worked great for getting intricate shapes in glass, as you said,
it’s like a scroll saw for glass. Sorry I can’t give you a
comparison between the Taurus vs Gryphon though.

Marta


#11
I have considered a RT stamping system from Rio, but the cost has
held me back. 

You can produce RT dies without that system, Suzanne. The saw
fixture itself is pretty handy, but not actually essential. Once you
understand how the angle of the cut is arrived at, you can simply make
a bench pin (normal wood type) with the face cut to the right angle
to produce a die with the thickness of steel you’re using and your
chosen saw blade size. Then you simply have to retrain your use of
the saw to ALWAYS cut straight forward, turning only the metal into
the blade, and never the saw. And you’ve got to pay attention to
holding the saw frame vertical. This is, of course, trickier than
doing this with the saw fixture, but it can be done, and some people I
know actually find it easier, since the RT saw is sometimes not as
easy to use as a normal saw frame. Once the die is made, then you
can punch the parts with almost any means of applying pressure. I’ve
seen small dies worked with just a good hammer and a bench block. Or
use a good vise and a couple steel plates. Or use a vulcanizer, if
you’ve got one. Etc. etc. You can, if you need, make and use these
dies for little more than the cost of the starrat flat ground steel
used to make the dies. Alternatively, there are folks out there
that will cut the dies for you, at quite reasonably cost.

Check out Lee Marshal’s web site, the Bonny Doon site. Along with
his presses and tooling therefor, he also sells a die cutting saw
that competes well with the RT saw, and on his site he’s also got
full instructions for cutting dies, as well as supplies like the
steel, etc.

Also, while the Taurus ring saw is a lapidary tool, not a metal one,
there ARE plenty of wood workers jig saw type machines, usually for a
good deal less than the Taurus, that work fine with metal. You want
the type where the blade is held in a paralellogram type arm, so the
motion of the blade is truely proper, rather than the really cheap
types where there’s just a spring at the top that the blade is pulled
down against. These types usually don’t take jewelers saw blades
anyway.

And another thought, for production work with sheet metal, don’t
forget that you can glue several thicknesses of sheet metal together,
and cut them all at the same time, perhaps with a coarser blade. this
produces multiples of a shape more quickly than cutting them one at a
time. Works with both hand sawing, and with a power saw.

Peter


#12

I have used a Taurus II ring saw for a couple of years now. I have
used it primarily for glass and lapidary purposes and confess that
the times I have used it for metal - both silver and gold - have been
to cut bezel and strip metal. It seems to leave a better edge for
soldering than I can make with a jewelers’ saw.

And, yes, I have broken a few blades which I have returned to the
company. Always they have replaced or repaired the blade without
charge. I have yet to buy another blade. I can’t say enough positive
about the company and the service they have given me. They have blades
now that can be threaded through a pilot hole and used like a
jewelers’ saw where you don’t leave an entering kerf. I’ve not used
one. I haven’t needed it for stone or glass, and I find a jewelers’
saw is quick and accurate and you can choose the blade size. I ‘m a
tool junkie and probably have more saws than the average female. The
Taurus and my jewelers’ saw are the most heavily used. By the way, I
have diamond coated wire blades that fit into my jewelers’ saw that
work well on stones, but the Taurus is quicker. Like Richard Olson
said, you have to learn to use the tool correctly and be careful to
check that the blade turns freely by hand before turning the power
on. Nope, I’m not related or financially connected to the company,
just a very satisfied customer!! Treat yourself to one for the
holidays. There’s never a bad reason to buy another tool… Connie


#13
A mention of ....."Take time to learn how to use it".......I agree
with that statement to a point .....The problem point
being........Time is money ! 

The Taurus ring saw is far too time consuming and fragile for most
applications…

Yes, it can make specific detailed cuts, albeit at a very slow and
precarious pace…

A handy side tool it can be… But at $400 + it’s an expensive side
tool…

Perhaps someone should try to convince the maker of the ring saw to
make a few modifications for faster and stronger cutting action,
whereby the mechanisms of the machine are heavy duty and the blade
itself becomes stronger through metal technology, such as a
titanium blade coated with diamonds…

Such modifications should add approximately no more than $150 to the
price, MAX…

A stronger, faster machine, with a stronger and faster blade…

Personally, that would be worth my time to write a check for the
$150 upgrade kit and would be money well spent.

I hope Taurus is Listening !

RocknLight


#14
I have considered a RT stamping system from Rio, but the cost has
held me back. 

A better solution is probably an hydraulic press from Bonny Doon
(www.bonnydoonengineering.com or rio), which you can use to form,
bend, or die strike.

I have done die striking with my hydraulic press and am very happy
with it.

Elaine Luther
Chicago area, Illinois, USA
Certified PMC Instructor
@E_Luther


#15

Dear Suzanne, I have been very successful in replacing much of my saw
work with pancake dies made by Dar at Sheltech in Albuquerque. I
tried to make the dies myself but, found it is an art all on it’s
own. Dar’s pricing is so reasonable and the life expectancy of the
dies is so long that I couldn’t see spending the time to teach
myself the process. You do need a hydraulic press but, for cutting
you don’t need much of one. Dar even provides the cutting service, he
does that for me in some cases where more pressure is needed for a
particular design. He has a 50 ton press. Dar is going to donate to
the Orchid dinner some money off of the price of making a die which
can be bid on if your going to the dinner. Sam Patania, Tucson


#16

One comment on your Taurus post–the Taurus 2.II.2 is sold by
Warner-Crivallo, a glass supplier, for $329.99. Still expensive,
but better than $400. Online at www.warner-criv.com

I didn’t realize they would take back the blades–I broke one while
learning after only about 4 hours, so I may try for a refund.

Linda
Linda Holmes-Rubin
ForCapital Associates of Atlanta
Phone: 770-479-7837
Fax: 770-720-7555
Email: lindahr@mindspring.com


#17
Taurus 2 Ring Saw for cutting metal 

Sorry for the late response… been recovering from an ice storm and
just able to get online today, for the first time in a week.

I have a diamond band saw (Diamond Laser 3000), but not the Taurus
Ring Saw. I haven’t used it on metal because the kerf of the blade is
pretty wide. It is awesome on stone though! I think the metal sheet
would be too thin for effective curved cuts, unless it was a fairly
thick gauge.

I bought a mini table saw from Micro-Mark for cutting precious metal
sheet and I love it. Of course, it only makes straight cuts, but to
me the long, straight ones are the most tedious and unforgiving with
a jeweler’s saw. This saw provides very clean, quick and accurate
cuts with no distortion.

If you’re interested, check the Orchid archives for I
posted at the time.
https://orchid.ganoksin.com/t/eureka!

All the best,
Dave
Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio and
Carolina Artisans’ Gallery
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com


#18
   I bought a mini table saw from Micro-Mark for cutting precious
metal sheet and I love it. Of course, it only makes straight cuts,
but to me the long, straight ones are the most tedious and
unforgiving with a jeweler's saw. This saw provides very clean,
quick and accurate cuts with no distortion. 

I use the profiform shear that Frei and Borel sells. It’s limited
in the guage you can cut to about 18 guage silver or yellow gold, or
thinner in white golds, but that’s usually enough for me. The
sheared cuts are clean and quite square, with very little mark off on
the face of the sheet. quicker than a saw, and no metal lost to
filings/kerf. Probably won’t do as well with very very narrow
strips (narrower than the guage of the metal), but other than that,
I’m quite happy with it. and it’s a bending brake too…

Peter