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Table-top CAM milling machine


#1

Hello everybody!

I have started using Rhino for CAD for the last few months and now
want to take the next step and buy a small CAM.

Has anybody heard of Maxnc 10-closed loop with a fourth axes milling
machines? If yes, how have you liked the machine and how are the
people?

Could anybody suggest other small table-top CAM milling machine?

Thanks
Deepa


#2

Dear Deepa

This is a big step trying to purchase a C NC milling machine. There
many types out there to choose from and picking the right one for
your needs is important.There are many factors like resolution of the
machine and quality of the product you are purchasing.Remember you
get what you pay for. Research this next step you are about to make.
It could make the difference in your success.

Best regards,
Mic Abraham
mcadjewelry.com


#3

Hi, We have a max 10, but not the closed loop system…The machine
itself is a great machine mechanically… the soft ware that comes
with it is pretty much useless…

we had to buy different software to run it.Technical support at best
is lousy…

But the machine is the best out there in that price range for small
stuff. Be careful as I believe their closed loop systems don’t work
with a lot of the software on the market… They won’t release the
codes so that the software manufactures

can set up their programs to run with it. You would be stuck using
the supplied software, running the system in DOS … Better to buy
the max 10 without the closed loop system and it will run on many
windows based control systems.

I have heard that the Taig mill is better and the techsupport is
good, but slightly more money than the max 10.

Daniel Grandi We do casting, finishing , model work, cnc, logo’s ,
soldering, assembly and enameling for designers , stores and people
in the trade… Contact sales@racecarjewelry.com


#4

I know this is going to generate the rhino contigentgency into mass
emailing of why I’m wrong with my choice, but Model Master in Canton,
Ga is making a great three axis mill that works rather well. They
are a little stingy on upgrades of the cad software, but thats
understandable. The milling software is Art to Part which seems to
read Artcam g-code well. The mill is sold separtatly from the cad
software, but I hear the new version of Artcam allows you to make
signet tops on the lathe, which is key if you want to make a crest
ring or something to that effect. Other than just being a satisfied
user, I think the mill has exceeded my expectations in many areas.
I did not come into this avenue of production with high hopes, but I
have made many of dollars using Mike Adam’s system. The tech
support is ok, but with anything of this type you need to learn how
to use it yourself, or if not you will be one of those synics who
complain that cad/cam techonlogy is taking the jeweler out of the
equation. Good luck with your choice Scott Isaacs Berry’s Jewerly Co.
Nashvillle,Tn Cad/cam designs


#5

I just finished building my own 4 axis CNC milling machine. I
converted a model 5000 mill from Sherline (www.sherline.com). I did
the conversion in such a way that the machine is still able to be
used in manual mode. I do not understand why the Maxnc equipment is
so expensive, since it is based on the same Sherline equipment.
These types of machines do not run themselves and are not necessarily
the answer to everyone’s problems. If you are currently using a
manually actuated 4-axis mill and you need the computer control for
artistic reasons, then you really are better off building your own.
If you feel that you do not have the technical expertise to assemble
a conversion kit, then you probably will not benefit much from the
CNC if you buy a turn-key operation.

The advantage of building your own is that the cost is GREATLY
reduced. I was able to create a complete 4-axis machine for under
$1500. This includes stepper motors, controllers, computer, power
supply, and milling machine. The other advantage is that you have
intimate knowledge of the machine and can repair ANYTHING that goes
wrong.

you do not say in your post whether you are an experienced
machinist. It really flattens out the learning curve knowing how to
run a manual mill first.

To see examples of some of my most recent work using my CNC check
out my website at:

http://www.statmandesigns.com

Look at some of the Celtic Knot patterns carved into the surface of
solid titanium rings.

Please feel free to contact me with any and all questions regarding
your purchase of any Sherline based CNC.

Daniel J. Statman, Statman Designs
www.statmandesigns.com


#6

I agree with Scott, the Model Master mill and Art CAM system has
produced models that have benefited my product line. As with
anything, you have to put some time into learning the product. This
product is not a waste of time, however…

Rick Hamilton

Custom gold and platinum jewelry
CAD/CAM and conventional modelmaking


#7

Dan, I’ve been using my manual Sherline mill and lathe for a few
years. I’m no expert, but I’ve been able to do whatever I needed to
do, and now need/want to foray into CNC in order to take advantage of
the some of the work I’m producing in Rhinoand Matrix. I understand
the THEORY of CNC milling but have very limited experience with a CNC
machine beyond a day of fooling around with one (Minitech 3-axis).
What I’m looking for is a source for the parts necessary and how to
assemble same in a reliable manner. From what I’ve seen in
home-assembled machines vs turn-key mills is differences in stability
and a difference in the life expectancy of leads, as well as overall
stability. The Max NC mills do not last very long in constant use
from what I’ve seen. Any guidance would be appreciated, just assume
that I know a little about machining in general, but at this point I
am noexpert. I know how things work, I make my own cutters for the
lathe and the hardest metal I cut is aluminum. Heh!

Wayne
Original Message:


#8
Dan, I've been using my manual Sherline mill and lathe for a few
years.  I'm no expert, but I've been able to do whatever I needed
to do, and now need/want to foray into CNC in order to take
advantage of the some of the work I'm producing in Rhinoand Matrix.
I understand the THEORY of CNC milling but have very limited
experience with a CNC machine beyond a day of fooling around with
one (Minitech 3-axis). What I'm looking for is a source for the
parts necessary and how to assemble same in a reliable manner. 
From what I've seen in home-assembled machines vs turn-key mills is
differences in stability and a difference in the life expectancy of
leads, as well as overall stability.  The Max NC mills do not last
very long in constant use from what I've seen. Any guidance would
be appreciated, just assume that I know a little about machining in
general, but at this point I am noexpert.  I know how things work,
I make my own cutters for the lathe and the hardest metal I cut is
aluminum. Heh! 

Hi Wayne, We have had no problems with the max nc machine and we use
it dayly. what you could do to upgrade your sherline is buy the max
nc control box and 3 motors (145 oz motors) do not buy the 70 oz
motors . The whole kit is about $650 and works great.They make a 70
oz motor system, but that can be a little under powered.and it is
cheaper.

They will try to talk you into a CL system, but that controller
cannot be controlled through any other software than theirs and their
software is really bad!!!. we use a different software ( master 5cnc)
to control the mill through their control box and it has the ability
to import dxf,g code, bmp and works well with the max nc provided
your computer is powerful enough. (Amd athlon processor 500 +
mghz)or any intel processor above 333mghz. It is a fully windows
based controller and you can do other things on your computer while
the part is being cut… This is different from other systems . All our
artwork is done in corel or adobe ( fairly inexpensive programs )
Hope this helps. Daniel Grandi

We do casting, finishing, model work /cnc/ assembly ,soldering,
Fusion,machine polish , hand polish in gold, silver,bronze, pewter
and a whole lot more for designers, stores and people in the trade
contact : sales@racecarjewelry.com