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Synthetic & Simulant Gem Nomenclature


#1
There is a man-made Alexandrite that is not corundum, but a true
simulant. Also, most alexandrite laser rods are 'true' alexandrite
(man made) in tha they mimic the natural properties, not immitate
like corundum does. 

Judging by the confusion in the above use of nomenclature, it is
obvious that people have difficulty with said nomenclature.

  1. A “man-made” alexandrite is a synthetic, not a simulant. Simulant
    is one substance simulating another different substance.

  2. Synthetic alexandrite and the natural counterparts are both
    "true" alexandrites. (I prefer not to use the word “true” though.)
    The gem does not have to be of natural formation to have the same
    chemical substance and structure.

  3. Color change synthetic corundum is a simulant for natural
    alexandrite. In this case a synthetic color change corundum is
    simulating a natural color change chrysoberyl.

Steve Green
Rough and Ready Gems, Inc.
Fine Gem Briolettes, www.briolettes.com


#2

Steve Green has it right but I think some additional examples might
make it easier to understand:

If two rubies are chemically identical but the first was
"nature-made" and the second was not, then the first is a natural
ruby and the second is a synthetic ruby. Nevertheless, both ARE
rubies, though only one is natural.

If a piece of red glass is used to imitate a ruby, then it is a
simulant of ruby. It is chemically different. It is not a ruby.

If a natural red spinel is used to imitate a ruby, then it is a
simulant of ruby. It is chemically different. It is not a ruby.
BUT… it IS a natural spinel.

If a man-made red spinel is used to imitate a ruby, then it is a
simulant of ruby. It is chemically different. It is not a ruby.
BUT… since it is chemically identical to spinel, it is a synthetic
spinel.

Note: Synonyms for “simulant” can include “imitation”, “fake” and
"faux". Synonyms for “synthetic” can include “man-made”, "created"
and “lab-grown”.

Here’s yet another way to look at these concepts. Whether or not a
stone is a synthetic has nothing to do with context: If the stone is
chemically identical to the real thing but was not formed in nature,
then it is a synthetic. That’s a matter of fact.

Whether or not a stone is a simulant IS a matter of context. A
synthetic red spinel is merely a synthetic red spinel (fact) unless
it is used to masquerade as a ruby (context): Then it’s a synthetic
acting as a simulant. It has become a simulant because of someone’s
intention that it appear to be ruby when it isn’t (which we call
deception or fraud when the intention isn’t disclosed :-).

So, Greg… a synthetic color change sapphire would be considered
an imitation (simulant) if, IF, it is being used to appear to be
something it isn’t, like an alexandrite. In that case, it is a
synthetic acting as a simulant.

Richard, here’s a couple for you :-). You said, “Synthetic
alexandrite is relatively new, it is more expensive, and I have not
seen much of that material.” I don’t doubt that this is true but just
as a point of interest, synthetic alexandrite was sold by JO
Crystals, the makers of Ramaura (synthetic) ruby; they didn’t make
the synthetic alexandrite, but they marketed it.

You also said, "Simulant is not in my dictionary, simulated is."
You’re right, but “simulant” has become an accepted gemological term
even though “simulation” would probably be more proper.

And you said, "If I order synthetic alexandrite, and receive color
change corundum, I have been sold something simulating alexandrite."
But, technically :-), you didn’t get what you ordered unless it was
chemically identical to alexandrite. If what you received was
corundum, then it cannot be, by definition, synthetic alexandrite.
But I do take your point, which is that neither the supplier nor
the customer cared much (or at all) about the distinction.

Beth


#3
Richard, here's a couple for you :-). You said, "Synthetic
alexandrite is relatively new, it is more expensive, and I have
not seen much of that material." I don't doubt that this is true
but just as a point of interest, synthetic alexandrite was sold by
JO Crystals, the makers of Ramaura (synthetic) ruby; they didn't
make the synthetic alexandrite, but they marketed it. 

Richard also mentioned he’s not seen much of it. That doesn’t mean
it’s not there. I first saw it offered for sale to me, as far back as
about 1985. Not sure when it was first marketed, but that was when I
bought my first sample. Wasn’t bad, overall, but the stone was (as
many still are) much lighter in tone than I’d have like. The natural
alexandrites I’d really like a good synthetic for, are quite richly
colored, appearing like an excellent emerald only with a bit more
blueish tone perhaps, and in the other color phase, competing very
well with the best rhodolite garnets, maybe even a bit richer than
that… I’ve not seen a synthetic, or for that matter, a simulant,
that came close.

I HAVE seen, though, both color change garnets, and color change
sapphires, that were very close to the color change range of the
typical flame fusion type synthetic corundum used as an alexandrite
simulant. That material has never, frankly, looked much like
alexandrite to me. Pretty enough, but wrong colors.

And you said, "If I order synthetic alexandrite, and receive color
change corundum, I have been sold something simulating
alexandrite." But, technically :-), you didn't get what you ordered
unless it was chemically identical to alexandrite. If what you
received was corundum, then it cannot be, by definition, synthetic
alexandrite. But I *do* take your point, which is that neither the
supplier nor the customer cared much (or at all) about the
distinction.

Um. My custoemrs, and me, frankly WOULD care. The synthetic corundum
materials are usually the dirt cheap flame fusion types, while the
true synthetic alexandrite not only looks different, but costs a lot
more too. So while I’d not mind being shipped the synthetic
alexandrite by mistake when I’d ordered and paid for the corundum,
I’d be rather upset if the reverse were true. If there are synthetic
corundum products out there, perhaps flux grown crystals or something
else more sophisticated than the flame fusion types, that are better
simulants for alexandrite, then please forgive my ignorance, but I’ve
not seen them offered. Since I don’t work with a lot of synthetics
these days, this may well be the case. But still, I would care to
have shipped to me what I order, even if the prices of the mixed up
materials were the same.

Peter


#4

Beth,

I generally do not like to get into nitpicking and I do value
everyone on Orchid’s opinions including yours but when challenged on
my opinions I fell compelled to stand up.

First off I would like to state that there is a difference between a
Natural gemstone and a Genuine Gemstone which should be obvious when
stated at the same time. A genuine stone is mined and a Natural
gemstone is untreated.

As for my statement of a synthetic color change Sapphire not being
an imitation or simulant of an Alexandrite, I still stand by this
statement. Just because they were sold in this manner does not make
it so. It can only be a simulant of an Alexandrite if it mimics the
look of the gemstone it is trying to mimic. If the synthetic Sapphire
changed from Green to Red it would be a simulant of an Alexandrite.
Correct me if I am wrong but I do not believe I have seen a color
change synthetic Sapphire that changes these colors.

Just because it changes colors does not make it a qualification to
be called imitation Alexandrite. There are several gemstones that
change color so find a gemstone that changes the colors that a
synthetic color change Sapphire changes other than a genuine Sapphire
and you now have a simulant of that stone.

Greg DeMark
email: greg@demarkjewelry.com
Website: www.demarkjewelry.com
Custom Jewelry - Handmade Jewelry - Antique Jewelry


#5

Greg,

A genuine stone is mined and a Natural gemstone is untreated. 

I have to disagree. I’m not sure where you are getting these
definitions from, but treated stones are often referred to as
natural as long as they are not man made. I can’t even recall ever
seeing the phrase “genuine” stone anyway as a description except when
dealing with laymen. As a matter of fact the American Gem Trade
Association refers to themselves as “The Natural Colored Gemstone and
Cultured Pearl Source of Information and Ideas” and they have been
the group promoting gemstone treatment disclosure longer than anyone.
They refer to all gemstones that are mined from the earth as natural
regardless of treatment (they just insist that you identify
treatment at the same time).

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
@Daniel_R_Spirer
www.spirerjewelers.com


#6
As for my statement of a synthetic color change Sapphire not being
an imitation or simulant of an Alexandrite, I still stand by this
statement. Just because they were sold in this manner does not
make it so. It can only be a simulant of an Alexandrite if it
mimics the look of the gemstone it is trying to mimic. If the
synthetic Sapphire changed from Green to Red it would be a simulant
of an Alexandrite. Correct me if I am wrong but I do not believe I
have seen a color change synthetic Sapphire that changes these
colors.

Hello…Greg… G.I.A. library accessed through Google
search…

The color change in alexandrite-like synthetic sapphire...

The most sought after alexandrites are a lovely green in daylight or
fluorescent light, but change to red or slightly purplish red in the
incandescent light from a lamp or candle flame.

Simulants, synthetics, and alternatives Synthetic alexandrite was
developed in 1973. It can be grown using the flux or Czochralski
methods. Synthetic alexandrite will have a similar color change to
natural alexandrite, bluish green in daylight and brownish red to
purple-red in incandescent light. Synthetic alexandrites often have
flux inclusions, triangular metallic platelets, curved striae, or gas
bubbles, depending on the growth technique that was used to grow the
synthetic. Synthetic alexandrites typically have a slightly lower RI,
and stronger fluorescence than natural alexandrites.

Synthetic color-change corundum (of which ruby and sapphire are
varieties) was developed approximately in 1909. The color change in
alexandrite-like synthetic sapphire will be bluish purple or greenish
blue changing to reddish purple, depending on the growth process used
to create the synthetics.

Synthetic color-change spinel.
Color-change garnet
Color-change sapphire

Please throw some cold water on me…Richard Hart


#7
But I *do* take your point, which is that neither the supplier nor
the customer cared much (or at all) about the distinction. 
Um. My customers, and me, frankly WOULD care. 

And so would I, Peter! But I was responding to the scenario that
Richard had described where the distinction between synthetic and
simulant appeared to be irrelevant to the parties involved.

Also, the synthetic Alexandrite that JO Crystals marketed was very
high quality (and expensive!). And, by the way, I was agreeing with
Richard that such material is quite rare.

Beth


#8

Hi All,

I wanted to post a few replies to the following statements:

Quote From: “Greg DeMark”

A genuine stone is mined and a Natural gemstone is untreated. 

I have been in the gem business for 25 years and have never heard
the above definition.

Matter of fact I do not think the word “genuine” is used by any
major gemological laboratories in their testing and certification
process. The word “genuine” is just too ambiguous to be used in
scientific analysis. You can have a genuine synthetic, a genuine
simulant, a genuine treated stone, a genuine natural stone and even
a genuine fake.

Would the true “genuine” stone please step forward. Correct me if I
am wrong.

Quote From: “Greg DeMark”

As for my statement of a synthetic color change Sapphire not being
an imitation or simulant of an Alexandrite, I still stand by this
statement.

This is very subjective. Personally I do think that a synthetic
color change sapphire is a simulant for alexandrite. Matter of fact,
synthetic color change sapphire is marketed under the name
"alexandrina" in Spanish speaking countries. Obviously the intent is
to simulate alexandrite.

I think Beth Rosengard’s post was excellent and helped to clarify
these confusing terms. I also believe that there are those in the
gem business who have motivation to “muddy” the issue and make the
terms intentionally confusing. (“Created” as opposed to "synthetic"
is an example that comes to mind.) There is a financial incentive for
those who sell simulants, synthetics and imitations to make them
seem as close to the natural stone as possible.

Steve Green
Rough and Ready Gems, Inc.
Fine Gemstone Briolettes, www.briolettes.com


#9

But I do take your point, which is that neither the supplier nor
the customer cared much (or at all) about the distinction. Um. My
customers, and me, frankly WOULD care.

And so would I, Peter! But I was responding to the scenario that
Richard had described where the distinction between synthetic and
simulant appeared to be irrelevant to the parties involved.

Beth and All

Not to beat a dead horse, but I wonder what experience has to do with
perspective. I am a Graduate Gemmologist, I give my customer all the
options, and I have had my current retail business for 13 years,
grossing in the six figures a year. I am not bragging, I am saying
that more volume of sales equals more knowledge, so I know I have
knowledge of customers, your and mine, same pool. I have samples of
natural, simulants, synthetics, ect of all different kinds of
stones. Most people who work in custom gold design, either do not
work with synthetics, or only limitedly, like synthetic emerald.
ruby, alexandrite. My store is extremely unique in that in addition
to custom design, engagement diamonds, platinum, ect we have 5000
pieces of high end sterling with natural opals, synthetic opals,
C.Z., man made quartz in colors natural stones do not come in, mystic
topaz, ect. The reason I spend the time I do answering these posts,
is that the public is far more willing to accept material that is
beautiful with little or no hesitation. If I had an attitude, was
condescending, prejudiced, ect I would influence my customer,
however subtly. By being aware and open to my customers response, I
have awareness of their reaction to these materials, and how they
perceive them. Daniel Spiers’s responses basically coincide with my
position as to the Gemmological nomenclature being used. Few of the
posters are Gemmologists, and it is frustration correcting the
ignorance the public has at my store, and it is exacerbated on this
forum. Short of telling someone that they don’t know what the hell
they are talking about, which would be the truth, I feel it might not
be proper forum ettiquitte, I try to keep on trying to educate. I do
not know exactly what you make, but I represent some Colorado jewelry
artists in my store, and some incorporate natural stones and dichroic
glass in the same piece and, you know, no customer ever raises an
issue paying hundreds of dollars for a sterling piece with real
stones, and pieces of glass. So in reality, don’t you think if you
used a syn color change corundum in a piece and charged a hundred
dollars (or more ) less for a piece than one that had a syn alex, you
would sell the syn corundum faster, and the appreciation would be the
same on the customers part. I know the answer, I live it evey day. I
do not believe I am in some rarified atmosphere where I am that the
geography makes a difference. However, if I had a high end store, and
did that dog and pony show, I would have a different client base, and
I could not mix the way I do. We have a huge number of return
customers because of what we do, and how we do it. We probably sell
to 80% of the people who come in the stone. It may be a $12,000
diamond ring, it may be $12 cz earrings. We are that eclectic, and
it works for us.

Good Night Chet, Good Night David,


#10

G’day; Did you know that there is a very large gem in the British
Crown Jewels called 'The Black Prince’s Ruby? Well, it isn’t a ruby
at all; it is a red spinel but was named ruby because few people
could tell the difference in the days when the Crown Jewels were
made, and it has retained it’s name, even though many folk know it is
a spinel.

This a famous example of a ruby simulant.

Cheers for now,
John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua, Nelson NZ


#11
I can't even recall ever seeing the phrase "genuine" stone anyway
as a description except when dealing with laymen. 

I have seen the term “genuine” used to pimp lab-created stones to
the public on any number of occasions, particularly at mall-quality
jewelry stores.

IMO, the term falls fall short of honest disclosure. The uninformed
often assume that genuine gemstones are not man-made.

Regards,
Lee


#12

Daniel,

Thank you for your comments. First off let me say that I appreciate
a good debate but I would never insult my opponent, especially if I
didn’t know their background.

To give you a little knowledge about me since you referred to me as
a laymen. I have been in the Jewelry business since 1973 and I took
my gemology courses from G.I.A. in the 1970’s. I have spent the past
30 years reading as much as time will allow to stay current about
Gemology, jewelry manufacturing and jewelry history.

I do not pretend to be the brightest light in the room and may not
even be the smartest guy on my block but one thing I do know is that
anything you or I know about Gemology is the result of great minds
that have challenged the common knowledge of their time.

You mentioned that you have never heard the term genuine used but it
is in fact a common term used to describe a natural pearl ( please
check your Dictionary of Gems and Gemology by Robert M. Shipley ) and
my opinion for what it is worth is that if this is an acceptable term
for a Pearl that forms on it’s own why should it not be used to
describe a gemstone that forms on it’s own.

Now I will challenge what you or I have been taught in the past. I
would not present a genuine-treated gemstone in the same way as I
would present a genuine-natural gemstone to a client therefore I will
not refer to them in the same manner.

There are four basic price levels involved when dealing with a
gemstone of a given quality, that is 1 - Natural ( genuine and
untreated except for cutting and polishing ), 2 - Treated ( genuine
gemstones that have been dyed, irradiated, heated etc ) 3 - Synthetic
and 4 - Imitation. My personal opinion is that to offer the best
service to my clients is to educate them in a manner that will not
confuse them. When presented with all of the people do
understand the difference between the cost of a genuine natural color
gemstone which in some cases is quite rare, one that has been mined
of inferior quality and then treated to make it look like a better
quality, a gemstone that has been grown in a lab and one that only
looks like a genuine gem but is made in large quantities. I welcome
any criticism to my thoughts but I will not go with the accepted norm
if I think it is confusing to the people I am asking to trust me
when I deal with them. Afterall as I mentioned before everything you
or I know about Gemology is the result of people that have challenged
the common of their time.

Greg DeMark
email: greg@demarkjewelry.com
Website: www.demarkjewelry.com
Custom Jewelry - Handmade Jewelry - Antique Jewelry


#13

Richard,

Thank you for the comments. I think you may have misunderstood my
comment. I was saying that a synthetic color change Sapphire should
not be considered an imitation of Alexandrite since the color change
is not the same as Alexandrite. The only look the two have in common
is that they change color. I do believe that Synthetic Alexandrite is
available from Chatham.

Greg DeMark
email: greg@demarkjewelry.com
Website: www.demarkjewelry.com
Custom Jewelry - Handmade Jewelry - Antique Jewelry


#14

Greg,

To give you a little knowledge about me since you referred to me as
a laymen. 

First of all I didn’t refer to you as a layman, I just said that I
had never heard the term used by anyone before except when talking
to laymen. The problem though is that by referring to a “genuine
treated stone” and a “genuine natural stone” is that you are
confusing the customer. Both stones are natural. Genuine is a
misnomer (perhaps for pearls it’s fine, but that’s about as far as
you should go with it). Natural means it comes from the earth. It
does not mean that nothing has ever been done to it. What’s done to
it afterwards is a separate issue. You can have genuine synthetics
(in other words they are genuinely a synthetic stone) too. And as
I’ve mentioned before, repeatedly, on this forum, what are you
telling the people when you show them two natural one is
heated and is exactly the color that most people expect to see in
sapphire and one of them is unheated and has a very light color. Both
are clean and bright stones. Which one goes for more money?? The
heated one! If you confuse the issue by saying that only the unheated
stone is “natural” what good does it do anyone, especially since the
other stone is also natural and it commands the higher price? I’m
sorry but just because a stone is untreated does not mean that it
will go for more money and by throwing in the term “genuine” you are
just muddying the waters.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
@Daniel_R_Spirer
www.spirerjewelers.com


#15
Few of the posters are Gemmologists, and it is frustration
correcting the ignorance the public has at my store, and it is
exacerbated on this forum. Short of telling someone that they don't
know what the hell they are talking about, which would be the
truth, I feel it might not be proper forum ettiquitte, I try to
keep on trying to educate. (from Richard Wise) 

I share your frustration Richard. You have answered the question,
well, accurately, and repeatedly. There is no need for anyone to
chime in anymore! The facts are the facts and they have been stated.

Elaine

Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#16

Greg,

What I was trying to point out was that G.I.A. did not seem to focus
on the color change difference between syn. corundum and nat.
alexexandrite as being so significant as to eliminate syn. corundum
as a simulant, subsitute, or imitation for alexandrite, and actually
appears as if the reason it appears in the list is because of enough
similarity to cause confusion. I believe I have synthetic corundum
that is more like natural alexandrite than what you have seen. I
might be able to take a picture of it and e-mail it to you when I
have a chance. Because of the low price, I believe it is
syn.corundum, not syn. alexandrite. And by the way, I just realized
that I have customers who come in asking if their
grandfathers-grandmothers alexandrite is real. So I believe if my
customers are presenting syn color change corundum represented as
alexandrite, to be identified, we seem to have to deal with the
acceptance by the public of color change syn. corundum as an simulant
for alexandrite as a practical matter.

I have never shown a color change synthetic corundum to a customer
and had them tell me that it did not have the same color change as a
real alexandrite, however I have shown synthetic corundum and had it
reject solely on the fact that it was not natural. Just as a
practical matter, if a customer comes in and asks for an alexandrite,
and I show them a synthetic and ask them if this is what they mean,
and they say yes, I am not breaking moral or ethical, or gemmological
law, because I am giving them what they have seen, and what they
want. Disclosure does not mean that I make them aware of what the
difference is in color change between synthetic color change corundum
and natural alexandrite. Regardless of all the ands, ifs, or buts,
it’s what they have seen, and what they want, regardless of what I
call it. Or what you call it, or what it is, or is not. And I believe
that providing a service to my customer is as importantas being
scrupulously crosses t’s and dotted i’s right.

Richard Hart


#17

Hi all,

Talk about genuine or not. A few weeks ago an acquaintance of mine
asked if he could bring his mother-in law- into my shop, because she
had inherited an extremely valuable ruby from her mother. It was over
60 years old and two independent jewelers had valued it at $250,000,
many years ago. The grandmother was from Curacao, (A half- baked
island that is part of the Netherlands Antilles). In fact, he said,
when his grandmother-in law was told how valuable the ruby was, she
immediately took the ring off her finger and put it into her bra as
she went home, so that the local gangsters would not see it.

She hid it in her house for the next few decades and eventually when
she died my acquaintance’s mother-in law inherited it.

So, after many phone calls to me, the mother-in- law catches a plane
to St.Maarten from Curacao to come and have the ruby valued at my
place.

To explain me, I have been cutting stones since 1976-ish and I have
been making jewellery since 1980-ish, so I have seen my fair share of
"old rubies". Bluntly put, I was a little less than excited.
Especially when they are valued in six or seven figures.

Anyway, she pitches at my shop straight from the airport,
accompanied by the son- in- law, daughter and various members of her
extended family. After the prescribed formal cheek kissing and
handshakes we sit down and the ruby is produced.

I take one look at it and I see a flawless neon pink step cut stone
of + 20 carats set in a twirly type unstamped gold looking ring.

What do you say? Do you say "This is not a ruby. It is either a
synthetic (or man made) corundum or synthetic (or man made) spinel,
but there is no point in me testing it because it is not a real ruby"
Or do you become a politician and say it with weasel words that
amount to the same thing? I chose something in the middle, the truth
mixed with weasel, called treasel words.

Well, well-- total disbelief.

I took out some uncut synthetic material of a similar color that I
had in stock and showed her the similarities between the two,
explained how it was made, the difference between real and not real,
blah, blah, blah.

“What about the other two jewelers?” she asked. “They were wrong” I
said. Shame on me, but the truth is the truth. You can lay the truth
in a box of cotton or on the edge of a blade, but it still remains
the truth. Treasel words simply slow the cutting.

There was an arctic atmosphere of injury as the formal cheek kissing
and handshakes were completed. They left.

I had suggested they go for a second opinion to another jeweler who
has some knowledge of gemstones and that is exactly what they did.

About two hours later, my acquaintance phones me up with glee in his
voice and says that the second jeweler confirmed that it was a
corundum and thereby by default, because it was pink, a ruby. Neon
pink, I might add. I will ignore the +20carats and the suspect ring.

It was, in fact, genuine corundum, he said.

For me, when I saw the stone, there was no point in doing the gem
testing waltz, taking out the refractometer and testing equipment and
then printing out a valuation certificate to verify what was patently
obvious to me. I was dumb and I danced myself out of $100 playing
honest Joe.

Dang! Next time maybe I should do the dance between genuine and real
and keep myself in some beer money.

I did, however, ask him if I could have one percent of the sale
price when it was sold in lieu of the fees I did not charge him. I
wait with eager anticipation.

Cheers, Hans Meevis
http://www.meevis.com


#18

Richard,

Just as a practical matter, if a customer comes in and asks for an
alexandrite, and I show them a synthetic and ask them if this is
what they mean, and they say yes, I am not breaking moral or
ethical, or gemmological law, because I am giving them what they
have seen, and what they want. 

I don’t usually take issue with your stands on this forum but this
is crossing a line. If a customer comes in and asks for an
alexandrite it is your MORAL DUTY as a jeweler to show them a natural
alexandrite first, as this is what they are asking for. If you show
that to them and then they say “no I want one like my grandmother
wore and what you’re showing me isn’t like that”, then you can say to
them, “oh, is this what you are thinking of?” and hand them the
synthetic (while explaining to them exactly what they are getting).
But just because they are miseducated does not give you permission to
continue to encourage their misand it harms the entire
trade as well. Then I (or someone like me) has to sit down and
explain to them exactly what they have and what the differences are
and by the time we’re done they think all jewelers are thieves and
liars because everyone tells them something different. While there is
nothing wrong with giving a customer what they want it is unethical
not to clarify exactly what something is and what they are buying.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
@Daniel_R_Spirer
www.spirerjewelers.com


#19

The problem people are having is that may synthetics are exactly the
same as their natural counterpart chemically and optically. However,
synthetic/simulant/man-made/created/lab are all the same and not
natural. Natural is dug from the ground, period. Doesn’t matter if
it’s been treated, still came from the ground.

People shouldn’t try to put a spin on man-made materials, they sell
well enough on their own merits. All you stand to do is cause
mistrust in the jewelers community. I’ve seen lab sapphire and
diamond rings going for $500+… obviously not $1500+ but the size of
the blue sapphire and the cut (while not great IMHO) would have been
extremely hard to find in a natural stone.

Craig
www.creativecutgems.com


#20

Daniel,

I will graciously bow out of this discussion and realize that the
next time I see a woman that has enhanced her look with implants that
she is all natural.

Greg DeMark
email: greg@demarkjewelry.com
Website: www.demarkjewelry.com
Custom Jewelry - Handmade Jewelry - Antique Jewelry