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Suggestions on Lost Wax Casting Machines


#1

I am looking for a lost wax casting machine, I can spend some money
on one, but not unlimited amounts. Any one have any suggestions on
which is a good machine and which ones to stay away from?

Thanks,
Jerry


#2

Look for a Kerr Hi-Heat Centrigul Caster. I have had good results for
the past 15 years. My caster is mounted in a 3ftx3ft steel box 18’'
deep, and I chained it to the wall. I’ve casted over a hundred flasks
this year, and it has definitly payed for itself over the years. My
trees weigh from 1 ounce to 14 ounces. I’m not sure if the neycraft
will cast larger flasks.

I did try Vacuum casting and it was ousted. There was too many “try
this and try that” problems. On a regular basis 50% of my castings
had to be recasted.

Brad B.


#3

There are about as many casters that recommend vacuum casting as
there are those who recommend centrifugal casting. I know I will get
some comments from those who centrifugal cast. The one thing they
cannot do better when centrifugal casting then I can do vacuum
casting is listed as item 6 below.

I have done vacuum casting since I started making jewelry. I favor
it for the following reasons:

  1. If you buy a vacuum pump for vacuuming the investment you have
    the primary tool to do vacuum casting. All you need is a vacuum
    plate to set the flask on.

  2. You can cast much larger items with the vacuum set up. I have
    cast up to 32 ounces of silver in one shot. I am limited only by the
    amount of metal I can melt at one time.

  3. I think you can control the flask and metal temperature to a
    tighter tolerance if you vacuum cast and use an electric furnace to
    melt the metal.

The electric furnace will tell you the relative temperature of the
metal. It is difficult to know the relative temperature of the metal
within 50 to 100 degrees when using a torch.

There is no delay from the time you remove the flask from the burn
out oven until you pour the metal when you vacuum cast. When
centrifugal casting the flask temperature will vary if you have to
heat the preheated metal to the pour temperature after the flask is
placed on the arm. The flask could cool or heat up while the metal
is melted depending on how you direct the torch.

  1. Less head space above the wax is required for vacuum casting.
    Vacuum casting uses less investment.

  2. The weight of metal in a pour is less critical when vacuum
    casting. You don’t want to sling too much metal when centrifugal
    casting.

  3. THE ABILITY TO PREVENT FIRE SCALE IS PROBABLY THE BIGGEST
    ADVANTAGE OF VACUUM CASTING. I have prepared a paper on prevention of
    fire scale when vacuum casting. I can send it through e-mail if
    interested.

There is a disadvantage with vacuum casting. More sprues are
required for vacuum casting than are required for centrifugal
casting.

just my two cents,
Lee Epperson


#4

I have been using a Neycraft countertop rig for the last 5-6 years.
Been very happy with it, but it does have its limitations. I have
casted up to 20 ounces with it at a single go and the results were
good, however I don’t think that I would count on it to do this
consistently. Not to mention the counter shakes rather violently (it
is bolted to the wall) at these weights.

The majority of my flasks are single pieces or small trees up to 5
ounces and here is where I find this machine really works well. Just
my 2 cents.

cheers Tristan
Tristan Meisters @Tristan_Meisters
Custom Goldsmith
Avoca Mfg. Winnipeg, MB


#5

You want to use a spin caster or a vacuum machine. You should call
the tool house you feel comfortable with and advise what your needs
are in lost wax casting.

Andy " The Tool Guy" Kroungold
Tool Sales / Technical
Stuller Inc
Phone 800-877-7777 ext. 94194
Fax 337-262-7791