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Suggestions for studio flooring

Mary here in Massachusetts looking forward eagerly to meeting Orchid
members at the 2nd Annual Orchid Day at Metalwerx this Saturday, June
18th. This should be fun!

I have been busy renovating a former bedroom into a metal working
studio in my home. So far I have put in a new ceiling, a ceiling fan
with moveable halogen spotlights, removed old beat up paneling,
painted, and covered an old pine floor with concrete board in
preparation for putting down a new heavy duty ceramic tile (17"
squares) floor. Since I recently found out from an experienced tiler
that the floor beneath the concrete board may be subject to movement
and might lead to cracking of the tile, I am having second thoughts
about what flooring to use that will stand up to heavy pounding on my
anvil, forging of metals, as well as being fire retardant.

Does anyone have suggestions for me on what to use, or sources to
go to for on suitable studio flooring, or information
that using these heavy duty ceramic tiles would be okay? I’d like
to do this job just once.

Thanks, Mary Collier Fisher
@Mary_Collier_Fisher

Mary,

You covered the best floor to have. First it was already there and
did not cost anything, except to refinish it. We have wood floors in
our shop and they are great. Drop a large stone on wood and you just
pick it up and keep working. Drop a large stone on a tile and you
will be shedding a few tears. If you look in the archives we had a
whole discussion about this about 2 years ago.

Rodney

We use good old commercial grade linolium, hope I spelled that
right, comes in five foot sheets. Minimum of seams and its tough
enough to roll your delux chair (that I am sure you will want to get
from Gesswin) around on. Color range is limited, we choose a green
with a minimal pattern. Gold shows up fine. Will scorch but what
won’t?

Richard
www.rwwise.com
For Information and sample chapters from my new book:

I read your inquiry with interest. I also had ceramic tile laid on
top of hardwood floors. Instead of the concrete board, my people used
a product called “Hardyboard” which I think is basically the same
thin except it is permeated inside with Styrofoam balls with concrete
on the outside. I have had some movement , but no cracks yet in the
tile. I used the larger tile not the smaller. his is just my idea,
but I would think that no matter what is used underneath the tile you
might get some cracking in the tile if your anvil base is not solid
enough to take up some of the “shock” from hammering on the anvil.
Wooden flooring under the tile and base should absorb more of the
impact than concrete or poured floors would. This is just another
opinion of course.

Ray

Hi Mary,

I recently renovated my studio, which has a concrete floor. When I
am working I can become preoccupied and accidently knock things on
the floor - so concrete was out for obvious reasons - also very hard
on the feet, legs and back when standing for long periods.

I chose floor tiles made of recycled rubber. It is a commercial
product that is used in such places as exercise weight rooms, day
cares, and behind bars. The fire rating describes its ability to
withstand the complete burn of a cigarette without marring it
(whatever that means). In any case, I felt is would be safe enough,
simple to sweep, easy on the body, virtually indestructible, and I
don’t have to worry about denting my work if I accidently drop it.
Also, it’s easy to move my roller chair from one work area to
another.

All the best,
Donna
Donna Hiebert Design

I would like to suggest something “other” than ceramic tile for your
flooring, if you do ANY work with I have worked in a
studio with ceramic floor and it can be a nightmare! It is never
forgiving.

Laura
www.LauraGuptillJewelry.com

there are three things that come to mind that seem important in a
floor.

  #1 how fast you can find a stone when it falls on the floor. 

  #2 how long is it going to hold up. (the tile may become a
  problem with this) 

  #3 how easy is it to sweep, and keep clean. 

in the shop portion of my studio we used a flat industrial rubbery
tile. nothing expensive, the stuff you get at home depot that
epoxys down. it fills all the above needs.

good luck
Matthew
mhgjewelry.com

Stuller as well others sell a gold mat… it is for the polishing
room . like fly paper to keep the sweeps in the room and from the
bottom of shoes . it might work in different areas. I hated when a
stone hit the floor.

Andy " The Tool Guy" Kroungold
Tool Sales / Technical
Stuller Inc
Phone 800-877-7777 ext. 94194
Fax 337-262-7791

    Does anyone have suggestions for me on what to use, or sources
 to go to for on suitable studio flooring, or
that using these heavy duty ceramic tiles would be
okay? I'd like to do this job just once. 

I simply used vinyl flooring in a plain color. The only problem I
have had with it is that I must tolerate the occasional burn mark on
it from when I have dropped a small hot piece of work. I like the
seamless aspect of it for when I drop tiny stones. Occasionally I get
down on my hands & knees to scrape wax off and then clean the wax
residue with a solvent. The floor stands up well to the abuse, except
for the burn marks. Really, we shouldn’t be throwing hot metal
around, anyhow! I am a fabricater and a caster, but the shield around
my centrifugal caster has always contained any flying molten metal.
Just be sure to seal all cracks around baseboards, etc., to eliminate
hiding holes for dropped stones.

M’lou Brubaker, Jeweler
Goodland, MN
www.craftswomen.com

The linoleum that is fire retardant is also flecked with bits of
shiney stuff that looks like mille. Get cheap industrial linoleum
and if you burn some of the tiles, replace them when it gets too
odious. You can’t have sparkly stuff on the floor where you will be
looking for dropped diamonds. Of course, that will never happen to
you–just speaking hypothetically for it has never happened to me!

Janet

I have a few industrial hardware catalogs at home and purchased
these rubber like - fire proof matts and put around my work spaces.
The are GREAT- especially if you drop a piece you don’t have to
worry about the items scratching or denting…

DeDe
DEDEMETAL

   I have a few industrial hardware catalogs at home and purchased
these rubber like - fire proof matts and put around my work
spaces. The are GREAT- especially if you drop a piece you don't
have to worry about the items scratching or denting.. 

DeDe - Can you tell us either from what company you purchased the
mats or the technical name for the material used for the
"rubber-like fire proof mats".

Thanks.
K