Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Stone setting and impact gravers


#1

Hi All,this post is to ask anyone who might aswer whether the
adquisition of an impact graver tool is a good improvement in a stone
setting shop. Not engraving, only stone setting. Does it help work
more comfortably and faster while keeping quality? Could it
substitute a hand-graver in all setting tasks that need a graver?
Which make (GraverMax, Lindsayengraving’s, Foredom, Magnagraver,
etc)would be most suitable and cost effective for stone setting?. I
would really apprecitate any comment on this. Thanks.

Fernando.


#2

Hi Fernando, I purchased the GRS System 3 about five years ago, would
never be without one ever again. If I had it to do over again, I
would go with a better (more expensive) model, but like you I was
hesitant to spend that much money. Only complaint with the System 3
is not enough power, and would like it to be adjustable as to speed
and length of stroke.

I still use the hand method for bright cutting and careful detail
work, but you can’t beat it for working bezels.

Good luck,
JMF


#3

Fernando: The GraverMax system is a stone setter’s dream machine.
Check out this url which shows a few examples of work done with the
new GRS handpiece: http://www.masterengraver.com/901/ This thing is
so fast for stone setting you won’t believe it, and the control you
have is second to none. If you have any questions you can feel free
to contact me at @Sam_Alfano and I’ll be happy to help. I
do stone setting demonstrations with the GraverMax at some of the top
jewelry shows around the world, and would be happy to demonstrate for
you if you’ll be attending any.

Cheers,
Sam Alfano
Exhibition Grade Hand Engraving
www.Master Engraver.com

p.s. I am not an employee of GRS nor do I make sales commissions if you
buy their products. I do demonstrate their equipment and teach hand
engraving at their training center.


#4

The most popular impact handpiece that fits on a Foredom Motor is
made by Badeco (Swiss). Used by many stone setters and particularly
good for channel setting. usually cost around $190. Available at 46
jewelry supply, 46 w 46 St. NY NY, 212 221 6088. They come with one
tip several other tips are available. These impact hand pieces are
different from the graver hand pieces. Graver hand pieces are used to
prepare setting areas or take off material for Pave setting etc. But
you have beading tools and regular gravers that are better & easier
for control & feel.

regards Kenneth


#5

The GRS System 3 is a lower cost alternative to the more powerful and
expensive GraverMax system. You can still engrave and do hammering
operations with the System 3, but the GraverMax has a wider range of
powers (and handpieces) and, imho, is definitely worth the extra
cost, especially with the new 901 handpiece!

    I still use the hand method for bright cutting and careful
detail work 

ENGRAVED PIN HEADS - Here’s an example which illustrates why the
GraverMax is perfectly suited for precise detail:
http://www.masterengraver.com/901/pinheads.htm

Sam Alfano
Exhibition Grade Hand Engraving
www.MasterEngraver.com


#6

I have to agree with Kenneth about the Badeco hammers. Most setters,
being traditionally trained use hand gravers and this type of hammer
for channel setting. A person doesn’t get good at setting in a week or
two, because it is a learning process that takes time and practice,
practice, practice, and most setters apprentice because of this for a
year or more. Some companies, like Stuller Settings have their own
schools. The power gravers work well for setting, plus you have the
added advantage of being able to use it for the bright cutting also,
but there are different techniques required because of the impacts of
the hammers. These air gravers have quite a bit more power than the
Badeco and you have to be careful because they can hit too hard. A
person can practice with using the power gravers to set enough to get
proficent at it, but like hand graver setting, it takes time and this
is going to be time spent mostly self- teaching because of the void of
teachers out there using this technology of air gravers. There are
numerous opportunities to learn hand setting. Having said all of that,
I will say that after you get past the learning curve of the air
gravers for setting, they work very well. Check out some setting and
engraving work I did with a Lindsay Air Graver, the rings being
platinum and diamonds and also engraved on all surfaces.
http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumIndex?u=1663997&a=13004336&f=0
Hopefully the link will come thru and not be truncated.

Regards-
Ricky Low
Houston, Texas