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Sterling vs. Nickel


#1

Greetings, Before I post my question, I would most definitely
like to say this forum is amazing… the info and tips I’ve gotten
in just a few weeks equal my years as a hobbyist jeweler. Kudos
to you all!! Now once again, this may seem elementary, but I’ve
mixed two pieces of sterling and nickel… sob :frowning: bench clutter
strikes again! Is there any simple way of testing sterling? or
an application that reacts differently with silver? I tried
sanding them with 600 to see the residue, one was definitely
lighter than the other, did I find my answer myself? Well, thanks
in advance :slight_smile: Terry


#2
  Is there any simple way of testing sterling? or an
application that reacts differently with silver?

Nickel is magnetic. That is the simplest way I know.

	Duane at Studio B inc.

#3

Hi As far as i know all nickel from missouri is non-ferris and
hence non-magnetic. Test with a nickel and a fork that is
stainless steel, the nickel in the steel keeps it from rusting
and also makes it no magnetic. That is how I see it in missouri

Rick


#4
  Is there any simple way of testing sterling? or an
application that reacts differently with silver?  Terry

G’day; One way is to first clean then heat them both with an
oxididing flame; the sterling will be blackened or at least
darkened and the nickel - or whatever - won’t - at least not
much. A more accurate way is to dissolve a tiny bit in nitric
acid with a little warmth. Add a common salt solution in water
and you’ll get a white precipitate, which when well shaken
coagulates. That precipitate will turn purplish in bright
sunlight. Then if you add ammonia carefully the precipitate will
dissolve. Oh, and by the way, pure nickel is magnetic, but nickel
silver isn’t; I suspect you have the latter. And nickel silver
contains no silver. There are other proofs, but that should do
you. QED Cheers,

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, 
      / /
     / //\    @John_Burgess2
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