Sterling silver salt & pepper shakers

Hi, I have made a set of salt & pepper shakers. I dipped them in
liver of sulfur and decorated with gold leaf design for the look. Are
they still functional? Can I put salt & pepper in it? If the answer
is no, is any other process that I can do to preserve my design and
make it functional? Or if I may send them to a place for the
treatment to make them functional? Any suggestions or ideas are
greatly appreciated

design for the look. Are they still functional? Can I put salt &
pepper in it? If the answer 

The answer is no for the salt shaker: You need a plastic or glass
sleeve inside to protect your solder joints from the salt (the salt
will eat right through them).

Note: I would make sure I only did a surface liver of sulphur
treament, ergo make sure I don’t get any in where the pepper would be
going, although if you use sleeves for both salt & pepper then you
won’t have to worry about contamination.

Kindest,
K. David Woolley
david.woolley@unb.ca

Salt is classed as a corrosive and should be in a glass.

The answer is no for the salt shaker: You need a plastic or glass
sleeve inside to protect your solder joints from the salt (the
salt will eat right through them). 

Here’s a thought that occurs to me-- how about coating the inside of
the shakers with that rubber stuff that you can dip tool handles
into? Pour it in, pour it out. Or maybe use lacquer instead. There
are a lot of coatings to choose from, and the inside if a salt
shaker is not subject to much by way of stress or abrasion, so it
should hold up well.

Noel

The answer is no for the salt shaker: You need a plastic or glass
sleeve inside to protect your solder joints from the salt (the
salt will eat right through them). 

I was just curious about this point. I live on the coast and was
curious as to whether repeatedly getting jewelry wet in the salt
water would have any effect over the long term?

Thanks
Kim Starbard
Cove Beads

how about coating the inside of the shakers with that rubber stuff
that you can dip tool handles into? 

Whatever you treat it with, it should be something that you would be
comfortable ingesting in your food…

Lee

Lee Einer
Dos Manos Jewelry
http://www.dosmanosjewelry.com

dip tool handles lacquer instead. 

I guess the question then would be, do they emit fumes, or in any
other way could contaminate the salt crystals? Definitely worth
looking into for those interested…

K. David Woolley
david.woolley@unb.ca

Here's a thought that occurs to me-- how about coating the inside
of the shakers with that rubber stuff that you can dip tool handles
into? 

If you plan to eat the salt from the shaker I would not. As far as I
know the plastic is not food safe.

mike

I have made a set of salt & pepper shakers. I dipped them in
liver of sulfur and decorated with gold leaf design for the look.
Are they still functional? Can I put salt & pepper in it? 

Hi, yes, they are functional. Sterling silver salt shakers should be
emptied immediately after use to avoid corrosion. They cannot simply
be left on the table, as one might do with wood or plastic. If one
wishes to leave salt in the shaker on the table for everyday use,
then have the inside gold plated.

Cynthia Eid
http://www.cynthiaeid.com/

salt will eat right through them).

curious as to whether repeatedly getting jewelry wet in the salt
water would have any effect over the long term? 

Although an experiment would give greater answers, thinking about it
I can simply advise rising the jewellery off when you come out of the
sea (most likely pat dry too, but is not part of the salt eating
soldering joint problem), for if you let the sea water evaporate and
a fine layer of salt to form then leave it for a time and repeat you
will most assuredly see a weakening and eventual failure of your
joints. Most people are likewise cautious of swimming pools and the
chlorine involved. Just take care of your jewellery and all should be
fine. Personally I would rinse coming out of the ocean, or as soon as
convenient.

Hope that helps dissuade your fears.

Kindest,
K. David Woolley
david.woolley@unb.ca

If you plan to eat the salt from the shaker I would not. As far as
I know the plastic is not food safe. 

I’m sure this is reasonable as a “better safe than sorry” reasponse,
but, really, if the stuff is thoroughly cured, you could probably
sit down and eat it and it wouldn’t hurt you. And intact, with salt
inside it, it would have to be astonishingly toxic to do anything at
all!

I believe in taking care, but you’re probably more likely to poison
yourself drinking out of a styrofoam cup.

Noel

The answer is no for the salt shaker: You need a plastic or glass
sleeve inside to protect your solder joints from the salt (the salt
will eat right through them). 

I believe that the salt shakers made of sterling, other than those
which may have been enameled inside, were emptied out and washed
after the meal. This is a formal type of dining which is not usually
done nowdays. I think that most folks expect to store their salt in
the salt shaker in our era.

M’lou Brubaker, Jeweler
Goodland, MN
www.craftswomen.com

I have some small antique Sterling salt shakers. They are in tact,
but were not fabricated and soldered but rather formed from a single
sheet. This avoids the problem of solder seams being “eaten” by the
salt.

Gisela