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Sterling security clasp


#1

Sterling security clasp for someone who “loses everything”?

I have a client who has chosen every single bead for a special
bracelet and is now going to tell me which beads to place next to
which beads. To say she’s micromanaging the process doesn’t begin to
tell the story of how much time I’ve invested looking at beads,
charms, dangles and charms for and with her.

Why am I permitting myself to be bossed around this way? Why don’t I
tell her to make the darn bracelet herself if she doesn’t trust me
to make her something beautiful? She’s my older sister, that’s why.
This is the first piece of jewelry she’s asked me to make and I want
her to be very happy with it.

Now she’s asked me to use an especially safe and secure clasp (or
two!) for her bracelet because she tells me she loses everything.
She’s mentioned having a chain as a backup in case the clasp slips
free of itself or selves.

I’ve seen this type of security clasp in gold, but haven’t seen
anything in sterling. I’d like something 10-15mm in length, minus
jump rings, for a one-strand bracelet. Can you direct me to a
website that would have an ultra-safe and secure clasp of this type
and size? Thank you.

P.S. Next time she’s on her own! I can’t take the stress.

Mara Nesbitt-Aldrich
Pastiche Custom Jewelry


#2

I use silver beading chain for my safety chains. They’re thin,
inexpensive, and easy to use. Just make sure that you let the length
of the safety chain so that when the bracelet is opened, it doesn’t
fall off the hand. It should just stop at the base of the palm so
it’s wide enough to slide on and off, but won’t fall off on it’s own.

Michele
MikiCat Designs
www.mikicatdesigns.com


#3

Mara- After 40 years in the trade I have found that "safety chains"
are a waste of time and money. Why? Because they add extra weight
causing them to dangle down off the wrist and get caught on every
thing they can, thus increasing the chances of having your bracelet
pulled off. Also they are always so thin that any thing that will
cause a sturdy clasp to break will go through a thin safety chain
like a hot knife through butter. Get a clasp with a figure 8 safety
that is fabricated and not cast. If it’s a cheap cast one it won’t
have any spring to it. Rio has tons of clasps. Try them. Or better
yet learn how to make your own. Have fun and make lots of jewelry.

Jo Haemer
www.timothywgreen.com


#4

Honestly, this is best made yourself. If you can open and close a
jump ring (and solder them for most security), you can make your
own. Attach it as back up to your regular clasp.

You need only a piece of chain, a spring ring clasp, and a jumpring
to make it. Or two jumprings and no clasp, if you want to make it
long enough for the bracelet to slip over her hand before it is
clasped shut. I can’t find it on the Rio catalog, although there
must be examples there.


#5

Mara,

I would think that a plain lobster clasp would work just fine, and
would not need a chain for extra security.

Alma


#6
(After 40 years in the trade I have found that "safety chains" are
a waste of time and money. Why? Because they add extra weight
causing them to dangle down off the wrist and get caught on every
thing they can, thus increasing the chances of having your
bracelet pulled off. Also they are always so thin that any thing
that will cause a sturdy clasp to break will go through a thin
safety chain like a hot knife through butter.) 

I agree! With many years responsible for repairs in retail settings I
found saftychains good for one thing; $ for future repairs. They hang
down and slide into the tiniest crevice, even between keys on
keyboard. They slip in easily but almost newer come out in one piece.
Figure out a better way. I have customers that fear toggle clasps (
for good reason) and often will wear another link bracelet next to
it, often intertwined, or perhaps with a jump ring or two connecting
the two. The second bracelet acts like the safety. A good fitting
bracelet ( not too long) with a decent lobster should be as secure as
the individual links. Face it, bracelets take alot of abuse and need
to be designed with that in mind.

April Bower in sunny AZ


#7
Sterling security clasp for someone who "loses everything"? She's
mentioned having a chain as a backup in case the clasp slips free
of itself or selves

I haven’t seen the “chain” safety clasp in my own travels in
sterling.

You could easily attach a small chain to whatever clasp you decide.

However, in the type of bracelet design you are describing, this
could be ‘fiddly’ to say the least.

Personally, I have only seen this type of chain on bangles and the
like, or a cleaner design. From what you describe, the chain may
catch on charms, dangles etc.

A more substantial solution might be one of the sturdy box clasps
with single or double safety closure found via any of the better
quality findings sites such as Rio Grande. A couple of other good
sites are Nina Designs (left coast) or Rishashay (right coast).

Good Luck!
WhitneyStudios