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Steampunk genre in art


#1

Hi All,

I have been asked to write an article for Metalsmith Magazine on
Steampunk and am looking for any interesting jewelry projects you
have created in relation to this genre in art.

Thanks.
Karen Christians


#2

Hi Karen.

Not necessarily jewelry but I would remind you of Hans Meevis’ blog -
steampunk creations by a jeweler.

http://meevis.ganoksin.com/blogs/

Pam Chott
www.songofthephoenix.com


#3

Hi Karen. I’ve made a little bit in this genre.

I have a site but frankly I don’t really have the time to photograph
all my work.

It bums me out but in the end we all rot so what the hey…
http://OmJewelry.net

Check out the “Steampunks have to eat” link for more.


#4

You may want to take a look at the work of Thomas Willeford, then.

http://www.bruteforceleather.com/store/Scripts/default.asp

Most of his stuff is clothing/accessories, but then he’ll pull out
something like the Steamarm -
http://www.bruteforceleather.com/store/scripts/prodView.asp?idproduct=212

His work is being shown as part of the Steampunk Exhibit in Oxford,
England.


#5

This is interesting. Thanks all. I found this image which is the
closest so far…although Hans’s cool dinosaur is amazing.

http://tinyurl.com/yjbo3nz

Fun research!
Karen Christians
Cleverwerx


#6

Thanks! I know of http://www.steampunkworkshop.com which is a cool
site with lots of make it yourself, sort of DIY. There is also
http://instructables.com which has projects you can do yourself.

I so want to make the cool computer screen and keyboards. Guess I
should have kept that 70lb Underwood manual computer!

Jewelry though is a bit tougher. Watch gears create the mechanics and
thanks to a couple of posts, I see that dragon flies and watch gears
are popular. I first saw this style of art in the mid 80’s when Dune
came out. Now it’s a whole new generation of making cool stuff, but
merging mechanical jewelry with Victorian esthetics that move on a
small scale is just cool. I like it.

Kind of like merging Lalique with techno.

karen christians
cleverwerx


#7

Karen, I hope you are aware of Melanie of Earthenwood Studios. She
makes ceramic pendants and beads and has a Steampunk line.

Kerry


#8

Over the air tv in Denver has a pbs channel that is Create TV. They
have a Maker program, and the on line URL is makezine.com. They have
quite a few videos of makers doing how to projects.

Richard Hart G.G.
Denver, Co.


#9

I’ve not followed the thread, but… if one goes to a site called
"instructables" one will find oodles of steam punk items and this is
a link to a site: http://steampunkworkshop.com that is worth checking
out. peace


#10

Hi Karen,

You may also want to take a look at work made by a local artist here
named Amanda Stark. I don’t know that she would necessarily classify
her work as “Steampunk” but it is very similar. A couple of her web
links are here:

http://www.artprize.org/artist/id/2387


#11

Have a look at the steampunk character in Hellboy II, Wild Wild West
machines - inspiration is kind of everywhere.

Jim


#12

Hi Karen,

I’ve done quite a lot of “Steam Punk” jewelry in the past 2 year. I
taught a couple classes last year at the Bead and Button Show and
the Beadfes Philly shows in which I did some steam punk projects. I
am currently teaching two classe at Beadfest Sante Fe next week, Bead
and Button and Beadfest Philly with two steam punk projects. Check
them out, or get back withme, I’d love to talk!

Kim St. Jean


#13

The term Steampunk is new to me. I looked at some of the pictures and
have not been able to get a sense of what it is and why is it called
steampunk. Is there a unitary thread to the design? Content? Please
someone, define and /or explain it!

Thanks!
Sandra
Elegant Insects Jewelry


#14

I’ve been known to do a bit of Steampunk myself… My motto, The
Gears must Always Work! See it at :

http://www.thingsrichandstrange.com/WebStore/steampunkemporium

Michael AKA
Dr. Babinski, Ds.D


#15

Karen, I’m not sure that he’d define his work as Steampunk, probably
not actually. But Dauvit Alexander, a jeweler working in Glasgow,
makes his pieces with found bits of steel and other rusty objects
and combines these with gorgeous fabrication and faceted stones. You
can see his Flickr photostream heRe:

For a quick introduction, my last Weekend Eye Candy featured his
jewelry:

http://tinyurl.com/yeuhgy4

Lora


#16

Taken from InventorSpot, “Steampunk is a subgenre of fantasy and
speculative fiction that came into prominence in the 1980s and early
1990s. The term denotes works set in an era or world where steam
power is still widely used-usually the 19th century, and often set
in Victorian era England-but with prominent elements of either
science fiction or fantasy, such as fictional technological
inventions like those found in the works of H. G. Wells and Jules
Verne.” That’s according to Wikipedia.

Since steampunk denotes going back or adopting a way of life
prevalent in the 19th century, in terms of jewelry, steampunk
translates into styles that are functional and/or fashionable, but
have an antiquated look.

According to eHow, “Steampunk [jewelry] is designed to reflect the
culture and fashions of the steampunk subculture. Like other
non-mainstream movements, steampunk places great importance on the
value of beauty that reflects unusual or antiquated ideals. The
jewelry is often bold and aggressive in appearance, but usually
attempts to retain at least an echo of femininity.”

Michele
MikiCat Designs
http://www.mikicatdesigns.com


#17
The term Steampunk is new to me. I looked at some of the pictures
and have not been able to get a sense of what it is and why is it
called steampunk. Is there a unitary thread to the design? Content?
Please someone, define and /or explain it! 

The shortest explanation? Victorian SciFi- think Jules Verne, H.G.
Wells, etc.,- by way of William Gibson, whose writings kicked off
cyberpunk. Cyberpunk involved a lot of blending of humans &
computers; steampunk does the same except that instead of electronic
circuitry, it’s based on steam engines.

Steampunk started off as a sub-genre of science fiction writing in
the 80’s, which influenced movies like City of Lost Children & comic
books like League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, which lead to it’s
visual style. That style involves both late Victorian & Art Nouveau
elements, steam engines & a lot of gears. It’s not just objects,
either- there’s an entire subculture that’s developed around it.
Some steampunk has a certain amount of fantasy brought in as well,
in the sense that magic is treated as a real thing & frequently as
just another form of science. The web comic Girl Genius is a good
example of this.

To get a really good sense of the artwork that’s coming out of it,
here’s a webpage for a show that took place in the UK:

Not the best photos of the work (you have to order the catalog for
those, I imagine), but you can still get a good idea of what its
about. The photos of the artists themselves are interesting too, as
they’re all dressed in proper steam fashion.

Here’s some more

It’s pretty cool. :slight_smile:

Sharon


#18
Have a look at the steampunk character in Hellboy II, Wild Wild
West machines - inspiration is kind of everywhere. 

Hellboy, hell yes! Forgot about that one or Wild Wild West, which
was a bad movie, but great gadgets.

Karen Christians


#19

Sandra,

Steampunk is retrofuturist fabrication, technical and computer art,
props, contraptions and gadgets which is highly ornamented with a
Victorian esthetic.

This area of art is something that I find compelling. Simply stated,
the art form itself, is a combination of high tech meeting highly
ornamental art or “scientific romance.” If you saw the film Golden
Compass, many of the utilitarian tools such as the vehicles or
objects were animated in this art form. One of the main tools in
searching for truth from the film “Golden Compass” was an
Alethiometer. More than a compass, it was highly ornamented with
beautiful engraving.

or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Alethiometer.jpg

The film Dune directed by David Lynch in 1984 was my first exposure
to an art form that would be come away from the screen and become
real objects. A simple light source in the castle in the movie "Dune"
had exquisite gilded wings and would travel with you illuminating
your path. It served both areas.

If you look at the website: http:www.steampunkworkshop.com, there
are all kinds of DIY projects that embrace this esthetic.

What I am looking at is not just the jewelry, but a new genre of
highly ornamental and detail forms in areas that are presently
gaining steam (not meant to be pun here!), where aesthetic is as
important as utility. Jewelry is a whole different area. The closest
I can think of is a hybrid between Victorian jewelry and mechanisms.
One reason I think it is difficult to find is because it’s not out
there and still in its infancy.

Slapping on a few disassembled watch gears and calling it
"Steampunk" is missing the point. I like gizmos and whirling
mechanics thoughtfully produced combined with highly detailed, very
old world, not just bang it out from overseas.

Here is an example that got me started.

http://www.notcot.com/archives/2007/07/carrie.php

It is a utilitarian bicycle basket which has black ribbons and is
all the rage now. It’s on Amazon and movie stars are carrying theirs
to the Farmers Market for their veggies.

karen christians
cleverwerx


#20
The term Steampunk is new to me. I looked at some of the pictures
and have not been able to get a sense of what it is and why is it
called steampunk. Is there a unitary thread to the design? Content?
Please someone, define and /or explain it! 

The source is a specific science fiction novel. The clothing style
is quasi-Edwardian. Often features clockworks, though that’s being
overdone and is not quite it.

Some lovely examples of non-jewelry steampunk art work at
boingboing.net, and also at Daily Art Muse blog.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com