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Stamping sterling and gold combined


#1

I am making some rings which have sterling shanks, and over which
are a disk of textured 18K gold, on top of which is a cabochon set
in an 18K bezel.

I am puzzled as to how to stamp the ring. Should I stamp the shank
with both a sterling and an l8K mark?

Alma


#2
I am puzzled as to how to stamp the ring. Should I stamp the shank
with both a sterling and an l8K mark? 

Many jewelers who do this stamp the piece with both marks. It is
questionable if this is technically in compliance with the FTC
rules, but nobody ever seems to catch any grief for it.

Steve Walker


#3

Right or wrong, that’s what I have always done with my mixed metal
bracelets.

Rob Meixner


#4

In usa, only the sterling. Least quality is stamped…

John


#5
I am puzzled as to how to stamp the ring. Should I stamp the shank
with both a sterling and an l8K mark? 

Yes


#6

Alma- I usually stamp with both. I have no idea if this is legal.
I’m not a lawyer. Good thing too. I’d have to listen to all of my
brother and sister’s lawyer jokes.

Jo Haemer
timothywgreen.com


#7

I gave a short, 20 minute presentation on makers’ marks which
included on quality marking in the US.

This was my understanding:

-You do not have to stamp your work with a quality (precious metal
content) mark at all.

-You may stamp your logo, name --makers’ mark-- without any quality
mark

BUT :

-if you do stamp quality then you must also stamp your makers’ mark.

-by law, each precious metal element must be stamped with the proper
mark–14k, 18k,.925, etc. So the 14k side of the ring should be
stamped as such and the sterling side stamped “sterling"or”.925".

-your makers’ mark needs to be stamped in close proximity.

That being said, many if not most, simply stamp their mark and the
various quality stamps somewhere on the piece. It just simply seems
to be the only way, even though it is technically not in compliance.

I know that some smiths just stamp their maker’s mark and avoid the
whole technical dilemma.

Jim Binnion, you might have something to add…

Andy


#8

The last time, some years ago, when this question came up on Orchid,
someone who claimed to be familiar with the regulations said you
have to mark it with the lowest grade material only. In this case
you would just mark it sterling.

Jerry in Kodiak


#9

Thank you all for your replies. I will stamp the ring with both
sterling and 18K. It will be nice for the buyer to know what the
metals are. Alma


#10

Here is a copy of the JVC Guide on stamping in the U. S.

Regards,
Dawn Nials
Product Manager
Rio Grande


#11

I was just doing a quickie repair on a silver and gold ring made by
David Yurman. It is marked 925 and 585 in side-by-side impressions
that appear to be cast right into the silver shank. Yurman is reputed
to be one of the most lawyered-up manufacturers in the business, so I
think it is safe to say that this is an OK way to mark mixed precious
metals in the US. This is consistent with the JVC link sent by Dawn
(page 7). Interestingly, on page 4 of the JVC guide disclaims legal
advice and notes the “Voluntary Trade Standard PS-68-76” which seems
to me to be saying that if you do it wrong you are not guilty of any
breech of the law but rather of not “voluntarily” following standard
industry standards.

Here is a copy of the JVC Guide on stamping in the U. S. 
http://www.ganoksin.com/ftp/JVC_guide.pdf 

Stephen Walker