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Stamping dot com on jewellery


#1

Hi All,

I just received my jewellery stamp “meevis.com” from Rio Grande’s
stamp department and as usual, an excellent job from them. The reason
I had the stamp made is because I am going to stamp all my new
jewellery with it in the future.

I figure it like so. This is the first time in the history of
jewellery that basically two words can act as an address inside a
ring or on a piece of jewellery. Think of it. Before the internet and
dot whatever, other than putting your shop address or your P.O Box or
your name and telephone number on a piece of jewellery, tracing the
manufacturer was somewhat difficult. It helped if you were Lalique
or Faberge though, but unfortunately I am neither. Nevertheless, now a
whole vista can open for someone with a computer and two words.

So that means that if the owner forgot where she bought it, or
forgot my name, or sold it, I am still traceable. Or if I move, or
sell my shop, or change my address etc I am still findable. If it was
lost and then found by someone else that person has a good chance of
returning it to the original owner. Also, I can put the appraisal or
photo’s online and keeps it updated for the owner. And of course,
there is the subtle bit of advertising that the owner carries around
with them. And therein lies the question…

Namely, with all the spam and junk advertising going around, might
this not be a bit tacky? A bit too in your face? I would dislike
lowering the tone of the neighborhood, so to speak. The letters are
only .75mm high and they look ok to me. Any smaller and they would be
difficult to read. I am sort of OK with it, but what does Orchid
think… yay or nay?

Cheers, Hans Meevis (from the.com fame)


#2
Namely, with all the spam and junk advertising going around, might
this not be a bit tacky? A bit too in your face? I would dislike
lowering the tone of the neighborhood, so to speak. The letters
are only.75mm high and they look ok to me. Any smaller and they
would be difficult to read. I am sort of OK with it, but what does
Orchid think... yay or nay? 

I say brilliant idea (and reasoning), thanks for sharing, and I
think I’ll do the same.

Cheers,
Trevor F.
in The City of Light
Visit TouchMetal.com at http://www.touchmetal.com


#3

Brilliant! What a great idea, but now that you’ve told us, everybody
is going to be doing it.

David L. Huffman


#4

I say yay!..How smart!! Might snatch that idea meself bucko.
Besides… now Santa will know where to find you…nyuk nyuk
nyuk…

Lisa, (4.5 months until Christmas Hansje) Topanga, CA USA


#5

Hans,

I think it’s a fantastic idea! I want my own.com stamp now! Eva.

Eva Martin
http://www.evamartin.com


#6

Wow, this is an interesting question. My first reaction was: very
smart idea. However, then I gave it some more thought (and I had a
cup of coffee). Note: No, my additional thought does not come with
ominous shark/Jaws music.

Now, first of all, I will date myself: I used computers when they
were completely DOS based. I am old. Some days, I feel older than
dirt or at the very least, that I knew dirt when it was clean. I had
the pleasure of watching the Internet evolve and can remember when
companies didn’t even have sites yet; let alone, recognize the value
of registering their own company name. That time passed in the blink
of an eye and it is rare for someone to not have a site or, at the
very least, not appear multiple times when Googled.

I think just “Meevis” would have done because you have identified
the key component of any search for you: your name.

Now, having said all that, do I feel that you have someone stepped
into the realm of tacky? No, I do not. Would I re-order the ".com"
version when this one wears out: probably not; just because I don’t
think it is necessary.

Cameron


#7
I am sort of OK with it, but what does Orchid think... yay or nay? 

I think it’s a great idea, Hans, as long as it’s that tiny. Of
course, it’s getting to the point that people realize that they can
look up "Meevis +jewelry"on line and find you anyway. The same
people who will understand and use “Meevis.com” would probably think
to Google you, but there will always be a few that need the extra
nudge.

I don’t think anything three-quarters of a millimeter high can be
considered “in your face”.

Noel


#8

I think this is a fantastic idea, as long as you don’t change your
domain name and always keep it active. Also, how did you decide to
stamp the jewelry as opposed to engraving it? I would also like to
have my name of my jewelery, so that people will be able to know that
I made it. How do you do this and how did you decide on stamps?


#9

I think anything you can do to identify your work is great…but a
lot depends on the customer. I sold 3 pieces to one customer 3 years
ago and she lost her favorite. Last fall she found me at a craft
show and said she’d been looking for me for over a year, lost my
card, forgot my name and was haunting the craft shows looking for
me. She wanted another piece just like the lost one (I do one of a
kind) but I remade the piece for her. I mentioned that all of my one
of a kind pieces are hallmarked and also signed with an engraver.
She hadn’t thought to turn one of the other pieces over to look!
Just be sure to mention that your piece is marked so that you can be
"found" again.

Donna in VA
http:www.sterling-ideas.com


#10

I think it’s brilliant, not tacky at all! I like it so much that I
think I’m going to copy your idea. I’m about to order a jewelry stamp,
finally. Now I’m really glad that I purchased a second, shorter URL
than the one I started out with!

Kathy Johnson
Feathered Gems Jewelry
http://www.featheredgems.com
http://www.fgemz.com


#11

Hi Hans,

I am sort of OK with it, but what does Orchid think... yay or nay? 

I think it’s a GREAT idea! If my URL were short enough, I’d steal it
in a minute.

Beth Rosengard
http://www.bethrosengard.com


#12

Hans, I see absolutely nothing wrong with it. Personally, I think it
is a really good idea. What price range do your pieces usually run?
Should that make a difference? Dunno!

Betty


#13
....with all the spam and junk advertising going around, might
this not be a bit tacky? A bit too in your face?..." 

It depends on where you stamp it, outside or inside of the shank. If
it is inside, I see no reason why the wearer would object to it. It
would only be known and seen by the wearer. So, they can locate you
if and when they want to.

If a friend or family admires the ring and asks the wearer about
you, the wearer can always remove the ring, look on the inside and
tell the friend or whoever about you. That would be quite handy
instead of getting back to the friend later with the details, if they
have not been misplaced.

And, as far as others are concerned, they cannot see anything. So,
it would not be blatant advertising which you are concerned about.

Just my views on the subject.

Rasesh
Mumbai, India.


#14

Hans,

This is why I love Orchid! This idea is brilliant. I sure hope it
catches on it would be very helpful. Unfortunately, I have run into
quite a few rings that were laser marked inside and all it takes is a
lap or two inside the ring with tripoli and all evidence on the
manufacturer and karatage is wiped away forever. I love your idea!

James S. Cantrell CMBJ


#15

I have been using my website as my method of branding for a while
now. You are right it is a really fast way of connecting someone,
any place, with you, no matter where you are. My name is short, and
hard to pronounce, so I keep hammering it at people. agte.com. I
knew if I used elizabethagte.com. they would glaze over the last
name and never find me in a google search. I got a simple rubber
stamp to brand my PMC. And let’s face it how many of our business
cards with out websites on them are taken with good intentions, and
then get lost way before they ever get to their computer?

A word of warning. Some galleries are still behind the times, and
are very territorial. They want to pretend that customers will not
have the where with all to google your name. So anything promotional
that bears your website might make them see red. Your choice whether
you want to accommodate their old thinking. Been there. I always
send a commission to the gallery in question if a web customer found
my work in their gallery first, but wanted something else. But some
galleries still assume we are going to rip them off no matter how
honest we are. So if you are marketing with galleries, be
forewarned.

Yours Truly,
Elizabeth R. Agte
Jewelry Artist
www.agte.com