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Stamping badges without expensive die


#1

Does anyone have suggestions about a process which I can use to make
some badges for a client? I would like to stamp them in thin metal
(any metal which can be gold plated would do.) I have access to a
hydraulic press, although I don’t own it. I need to make only 10 or
12 of the badges.

Is there some easy, INEXPENSIVE way to make the molds (nylon, jet
set, shellac, etc.) that would last through that many impressions? I
have never done this kind of job, and would appreciate any and all
ideas.

The price of the job does not warrant cutting steel dies.

Thanks,
David Barzilay, Lord of the Rings


#2

David, many years ago (at least 10), there was a technical article
in Rock & Gem magazine on making detailed embossing dies. The fellow
used JB Weld to build the model, over a two part wooden die block. He
didn’t have a hydraulic press, just used his vise to squeeze the two
parts together. It might be worthwhile looking up in the library stacks.


#3

David , A couple of possibilities … cast dies in cerro bend type
alloy (melts at ~158 F) or use a metal filled epoxie. With either
material if your dies don’t last through the job just cast another
set. Original mold could even be carving wax.

Jeff
Demand Designs
Analog/Digital Modeling & Goldsmithing
http://www.aztec-net.com/~jdemand


#4

Hi David , here is an idea I would like comment on . In my day job I
sometimes use the new moldable epoxy packs - I’m not sure of the
proper term , they come in a bar with epoxy around the hardner , you
just break of the amount you need , mold it and let it set . Anyway ,
I wondered if you could mold some in a steel tube , press your form
into it , let it harden and then stamp your form into it ? Anyone
tried this ?? Just an idea in the middle of the night ! Good luck ,
Philip @Wellsie


#5
Is there some easy, INEXPENSIVE way to make the molds (nylon, jet
set, shellac, etc.) " 

Hi David, What about making the molds from JB weld?

Drew
Andrew Horn
Designer,
The Master’s Jewel
www.mastersjewel.com


#6
 A couple of possibilities ... cast dies in cerro bend type alloy
(melts at ~158 F) or use a metal filled epoxie. With either
material if your dies don't last through the job just cast another
set. Original mold could even be carving wax. 

an interesting thread- where does one get this cerro bend alloy,
and what is its composition?


#7

Hi,

an interesting thread- where does one get this  cerro bend alloy,
and what is its composition?

This type of material is also know in the metal working industries
as ‘Fixturing Alloy’. The book I have doesn’t list the ingredients,
but some of them are probably tin & other metals that make an alloy
that has a melting temp of 158F. The book indicates it contains no
class 1 ozone depleting chemicals.

One source for it is mscdirect.com. Their item number is 00263590
cost, $40.56 per lb. I’m sure other industrial supply houses would
also sell it.

Dave


#8
    an interesting thread- where does one get this  cerro bend
alloy, and what is its composition? 

They are bismuth alloys – Cerro metal many other names for
particular alloys . . There are several of them all with very
low melting points.

You can find application and technical data heRe:

http://www.belmontmetals.com/products/low-melting.cfm

jesse


#9
   an interesting thread- where does one get this  cerro bend
alloy, and what is its composition? 

Its an alloy of bismuth, lead, tin, and cadmium. A somewhat
unhealthy mixture so use good house keeping practices. There are
different alloys with melting points starting around 117F. An
interesting property is that most of these alloys expand when
solidifying. Some sources aRe:

http://www.smallparts.com    fusible metals
http://www.use-enco.com      fixturing alloy
http://www.mcmaster.com      cerro-bismuth alloys

Jeff
Demand Designs
Analog/Digital Modeling & Goldsmithing
http://www.aztec-net.com/~jdemand