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Spraying Prips Flux


#1

When spraying Prips flux (or any other spray to protect from
firescale) what do you use as sort of a splash guard? I’ve been using
a cut up milk carton as a shield but the thing melts as I heat the
Prips to frost as I spray. If I don’t use a shield it leaves a residue
on the surrounding area. I like the spray Prips flux rather than
dipping my pieces because I can spray after I get some parts set up to
solder.

I finally solved the clogged sprayer problem from the Orchidians
suggestion of storing the sprayer upside down in a little container
of water. I suffered for years and tried numerous things but this
actually works. :slight_smile:

Annette
@Annette_Andres


#2

Annette, If you live in a town that has a store selling commercial
plastics, buy a thin sheet of TEFLON. Teflon can take very high
temperature and nothing sticks to it. …Bob Williams


#3
 I like the spray Prips flux rather than dipping my pieces because
I can spray after I get some parts set up to solder. 

Two alternatives:

  1. Use a fluxed brush to place your solder bits. This serves the
    purpose of applying both flux and solder to your already-set-up parts.

  2. Dip, brush or spray the parts and then dry them with the torch
    before doing the set up.

Beth


#4

For Prips Flux spraying I made a mini spray booth out of aluminum
roofing flashing. That metal is so soft that I just cut it with my
all purpose serrated shears and folded it up like a cardboard box. I
suspend the piece using a third hand. Some spray still escapes but
this has really helped me to contain the worst of the mist. It gets
hot sometimes and if you get the flame too close I suppose it might
melt but I’ve been using this method for at least four years now.
Just remember not to handle the spray booth if it might be hot.

As a point of possible interest, I now use a very small pump atomizer
to spray the flux. I got it in the travel storage section of a
variety store. I think it is intended for some type of cosmetic
application. It produces amist of anything I’ve tried, is very
manuverable and cost around $1.29. The second bottle like this I
bought does not produce as fine of a mist so there is some variation
in the production of the bottles. Linda Moughemer


#5

Hello Annette,

    When spraying Prips flux (or any other spray to protect from
firescale) what do you use as sort of a splash guard? 
Glad the tip on storing the sprayer upside down in water-filled cap

helps you out. So far as the over-spray, I’ve put down a sheet of
ordinary, heavy-duty tin foil under my soldering block. It extends
out 12" or so, and catches most of the spray. I just throw it away
when it gets sort of gummy. I, too, would appreciate a better way to
contain the over-spray. Hope someone has a better answer, but this
does offer some protection. Judy in Kansas

Judy M. Willingham, R.S.
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
237 Seaton Hall
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS 66506
(785) 532-2936


#6

Do you like coffee? Cut the about a third of the side out of a 3 lb
metal can. Can be used for spraying Prip’s and also as a light shield
when you are annealing metal in order to see the metal colour changes
more easily. Karen


#7

Hello Annette,

    When spraying Prips flux (or any other spray to protect from
firescale) what do you use as sort of a splash guard? 
Glad the tip on storing the sprayer upside down in water-filled cap

helps you out. So far as the over-spray, I’ve put down a sheet of
ordinary, heavy-duty tin foil under my soldering block. It extends
out 12" or so, and catches most of the spray. I just throw it away
when it gets sort of gummy. I, too, would appreciate a better way to
contain the over-spray. Hope someone has a better answer, but this
does offer some protection. Judy in Kansas

Judy M. Willingham, R.S.
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
237 Seaton Hall
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS 66506
(785) 532-2936


#8
    Annette, If you live in a town that has a store selling
commercial plastics, buy a thin sheet of TEFLON. Teflon can take
very high temperature and nothing sticks to it. ...Bob Williams 

Do beware of heating Teflon to anything over 530 degrees fahrenheit.
At that temperature the PTFE coating begins to release toxic fumes,
which may not affect humans immediately, but will kill pet birds
almost instantly, and may cause PTFE toxicity in humans with repeated
exposure. There are warnings on Teflon-coated pans now, warning of
this possibility.

–Kathy Johnson
Feathered Gems Jewelry
http://www.featheredgems.com