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[Source] Scotch stone


#1

I’m wondering if anyone has a source for scotch stone. Thanks!!

Leanne


#2

try Cooksons UK… i I have one sent to me as a gift - highly coveted
part of my collection- there is no equal…and they are quite
breakable.

New Olreans Jewlers Supply-Royal Street NO,LA-had then pre
-katrina…I belive the name brand is Abercrombie’s,(Abercrombie’s
genuine scotch stone) or Rosenthal’s .rjsintl.com in Miami…they are
very hard to find and the suppliers i have listed are in books dating
to the 60’s .good luck.If you find them please let me know of it!
thanks, R.E.R.

just looked the brand name isthe celebrated "Tam O 'Shanter"
Stone…try lithographers supply …if you type scotch, you’ll get 3m
products…


#3

Hi Leanne, Try Allcraft in NY.

Cynthia Eid
http://www.cynthiaeid.com


#4

G’day

I understand that Scotch Stone became unavailable quite a few years
ago. Now I bought a piece in those days - because a couple of books
said the this was a necessary item to use in the early stages of
polishing metals. But I soon learned that 'wet’n’dry papers starting
with 400 grit and going down to around 1000 grit with final
application of tripoli, rouge, and finer polishing media will do just
as good a polishing job. The books recommending scotch stone tend to
be outdated. I think this stone was used before the more convenient
papers were available

Cheers for now,
JohnB of NZ


#5

As always your is unimpeachable. As someone mentioned
Allcraft has it and perhaps Gesswein?

John, like you I’ve been around for a few years and I love 3M
products. But there’s something about ‘scotch stone’; the way it
breaks down as one uses it and conforms to a shape is something I
still find very useful.

With respect
KPK


#6

You can check with a local Tool/machine shop supply some sell what
is called Scotch stones or die sticks(Used for cleaning and
repairing dies) They come in different grit sizes and shapes. But
I’m pretty sure that true/real Scotch stones are no longer
available. Here is a set of assorted grits

http://tinyurl.com/2wo4cw

Here is McMasters Carr page #2600 silversmith stones which are about
the same as the die stones.

http://tinyurl.com/2tsay4

The lead in to the files list at the top of the page gives a good
explanations about stones.

glen
been there done that !


#7
I understand that Scotch Stone became unavailable quite a few
years ago. Now I bought a piece in those days - because a couple
of books said the this was a necessary item to use in the early
stages of polishing metals. But I soon learned that 'wet'n'dry
papers starting with 400 grit and going down to around 1000 grit
with final application of tripoli, rouge, and finer polishing media
will do just as good a polishing job. The books recommending scotch
stone tend to be outdated. I think this stone was used before the
more convenient papers were available 

I’ll argue some of that John.

First, the manufacturer did have a problem, namely a fire that
destroyed some or much of their plant, so there was a period of
several years when there was no production. They’re back in
production now, though I think at lower capacity, and now,
occasionally their quarry gets flooding which can put quite a
temporary dent in their production too. But you can still get them.
Allcraft in New York is the main supplier I know of in the U.S. There
may be others. The info I’ve got on the supplier comes from Tevel,
owner of Allcraft, and a nice fellow to deal with too. Seeing him
every year is one fun reasons I go to the SNAG convention every year.
He’s always got some new and wonderful oddball deal. Scotch stones
are one such. A great selection of hammers and stakes is another, for
those who need such. One year he’d managed to get hold of a custom
production run of 10/0 hercules saw blades. Almost too fine to be of
much use, but when you really need an ultra fine blade, which I do
now and then, those are wonderful… And then there are the deals he
seems to find on all sorts of files… How 'bout tiny round or square
needle files, literally the size of a modest sewing needle. (they’re
made for watchmakers, to adjust the holes in the hands, I think…)
Anyway. 'enough already with the Allcraft advert… (grin)

Scotch stones are somewhat unusual as a finishing product because of
their distinct softness. They quickly wear down to conform to the
general shape of the surface one is working on. You are correct that
for many surfaces, papers or one of the many other wonderful new
generation finishing products like many from 3M, are easier and
faster. But for some distinct uses, such as getting into an otherwise
blind corner or other limited access small area, scotch stones are
just wonderful. Unlike many other ways to do it, they don’t leave you
with divots, gouges, a depressed-in-the-middle surface, or the like.
One can also, of course, use machinists/die makers pencil stones in
the same way, and some of them are formulated to work rather the same
as a scotch stone. But they’re not any cheaper, nor do they work
better. In this day and age when we’re all used to glitzy power tools
and high tech toys at the bench, finishing a small corner or recessed
area by shaping a small bit of slate stone to match the contour,
wetting the thing, and rubbing it back and forth like a pencil erasor
may seem way too old fashioned for some people. But when you try it,
and find how quickly and well this actually works, you get hooked.
They’re fastest on silver, of course, but I use em now and then even
with platinum, and at times, they’re still the best way I’ve found to
clean up certain types of detailed areas, even in a shop equipped
with a laser welder, high speed handpieces, or even another of my
old favorites, a die filer handpiece…

Peter Rowe


#8

Thanks to everyone to responded to my query. I’ve put in a request
with Allcraft. I weave (chainmaille and viking knitting) metals with
traditional methods using wooden dowels, homemade wooden drawplate
etc, so the scotch stone really appeals to me.

Leanne
Leanne Elliott Soden
Pieces of Class


#9

Reading about the comments on scotch stone, I wondered what this
stone was, so I Googled and found out what it was that was being
discussed. Over here in the UK we call it “Water of Ayre stone”, now
I know what everyone is talking about may I pass on a tip given to
me by my grandfather when he taught me hand engraving when I was an
apprentice back in the 1960s. This was my grandfather’s method of
erasing unwanted engraving. First use a piece of pumice stone to
erase the lettering using water as a lubricant, then use the Water
of Ayre stone to remove the scratches left by the pumice stone, again
using water as the lubricant, then use a piece of wood charcoal to
remove the faint scratches left by the Ayre stone, using fine oil as
a lubricant, then polish with a mop and tripoli and finally finish
with a soft mop and rouge, using fine parrafin oil as a lubricant
when finishing with rouge. This leaves you with a perfectly flat,
mirror finish ready for re engraving. I can tell you that this
system work fine.

Peace and good health to all
James Miller in the UK


#10

they are most certainly still available under the name water of ayr
stone…dick blick even sells them…


#11

I purchased mine from at allcraftonline.com. I called (800-645-7124)
and spoke to Tevel. He told me that he gets them from a man in
Scotland. Apparently they are hard to come by and I had to wait
awhile to get them.

Diane