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[Source] Magnetized Pliers


#1

Strange question for the group. I used my favorite pliers to make
some magnetic clasp/chain extenders and now the pliers are
magnetized. How on earth do I de-magnetize them. They are very
irritating when allthey do is stick to other pliers.

Thanks
Bernadette Johnson


#2
Strange question for the group. I used my favorite pliers to make
some magnetic clasp/chain extenders and now the pliers are
magnetized. How on earth do I de-magnetize them. They are very
irritating when allthey do is stick to other pliers. 

Passing the pliers through a coil of wire energized with an
alternating current should do the trick. but, I can’t think of a
convenient (or safe) way to do that. The outside of an unshielded
motor (e. g., table top fan) might have enough of a field to do
the trick but I really don’t know. Rube Goldberg (me) might try
something like making a few dozen turns of copper wire around a
hollow form and putting it in series with a light socket with a 60
watt bulb, to keep the current through the coil to a reasonable
level, in it but there are hazards with this approach.

alonzo


#3

Any watch tool company has magnetizer/demagnetizers (Gesswein,
Esslinger, Borel) under $100. Electric coil that makes a magnetic
field. pass tool through on direction it’s magnetized opposite way
demagnetized. Reversing polarity. First shop 40 years ago had a
homemade one from a motor coil. Im sure there is a utube somewhere on
making one. Gary


#4
How on earth do I de-magnetize them. 

If you know a TV shop which still works on old tube sets, they will
probably have a degausser, which is just a coil of wire hooked up to
AC current. Anything which produces a fluctuating magnetic field
would work.

Al Balmer


#5

Heat the metal beyond its Curie point.

John


#6
Heat the metal beyond its Curie point. 

Which is beyond red hot, in the order of 1500 F. It’s a little
tricky. The steel tends to lose carbon unless heated in an inert
atmosphere or coated with a powder made for the purpose. It then has
to be quenched (probably in oil) and then tempered. Easier to use a
degaussing coil. Nice to know this is a tool used by
watchmakers/repairmen.

Al Balmer


#7

Demagnetisers are really very cheap. Take a look at these. You just
switch it on and insert the item to be demagnetised into the cavity
and withdraw it slowly.


#8
Strange question for the group. I used my favorite pliers to make
some magnetic clasp/chain extenders and now the pliers are
magnetized. How on earth do I de-magnetize them. They are very
irritating when allthey do is stick to other pliers. 

See if you can find an old-school TV repair shop. They have a tool
called a degaussing coil. They were commonly needed for the old CRT
monitors, but many older shops still have one tucked away in the
back. Some machine shops have a similar tool to degauss tool bits.

An alternate, but less reliable, method is several light strikes
with a hammer (not enough to mark or deform the tool) to “reset” the
grain structure, or to heat the tool to the non-magnetic temperature.

Ron Charlotte
Gainesville, FL