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[Source] Gem Dust


#1

Hi,

I am looking for The ACTUAL dust from when the precious stones get
cut or filed. Dust from diamonds, emeralds, sapphire’s, ruby’s and any
precious stone dust.

Could you direct me where I could purchase these ground down
precious gems?

Thank you so much,
Theresa


#2

This dust is usually captured in the water that drips onto the lap
during cutting. There is no actual ‘dust’ collected through any means
such as a dust collector or something. Also, this stuff looks like
dust (white dust usually). There isn’t much substance to it. If
you’re looking for crushed up stone that’s different and not a result
from cutting the stone.

What were you planning on using it for (if you feel like disclosing
that)?

Craig
www.creativecutgems.com


#3

Theresa,

I facet precious stones every day, all day. The “dust” (we call it
swarf) gets flushed into a bucket under my bench, mixed with the oil
or water I use as a lubricant for my diamond laps. It’s a kind of
heavy sludge, which you are welcome to any time. Are you serious?

Wayne Emery


#4

Yes they are serious I had a request from a gentlemen interested in
making medieval fabric. It had gem dust encrusted on by some long
lost secret we now call fabric glue heh

40 gallons of goo gone and hot water and a very fine screen could
reclaim the gem dust lol

Silver & Cameo Heritage Jewelry
www.corneliusspick.com


#5

Just an interesting side note on this discussion:

I seem to recall hearing that Stradivarius used ground precious
stones in the varnish for the instruments he constructed. I suspect
he used a mortar and pestle type setup for the grinding as compared
to the “swarf” that would come from grindstones.

As to whether this improved the sound produced I cannot say but some
claim it does.

Don’t forget many precious stones reportedly have “special” powers.
Amethyst was believed to prevents drunkeness.

Mike O’Toole


#6
I seem to recall hearing that Stradivarius used ground precious
stones in the varnish for the instruments he constructed. I
suspect he used a mortar and pestle type setup for the grinding as
compared to the "swarf" that would come from grindstones. 

Seeing I believe that it was Amber he used it might have actually
produced a nice varnish, Amber was also popular as component as bow
rosin for the playing of said violins.

The things you learn when you live with a musician.

Cheers,
Norah.


#7

Ground and powdered gemstone have been used for quite a long time as
a pigment for paints. Although their use is more limited these days,
some traditional painters still prefer to mix their own pigments, and
incorporate gemstones into their paints. You will need to use whole
not “swarf,” to do this. You can use broken or chipped
stones, low-grade stones, or rough material. There is no need to use
fine gems for this.

You will need to crush your stones into a powder. You can use a
mortar and pestle on softer stones, but you will find that beryl and
corundum will also wear away part of your mortar and pestle, ruining
your pigments. There are special grinders used for this, made of
hardened steel. They work on a principle similar to a millstone.

I know a painter who does grind his own pigments and uses gemstones
in his paints. If you are interested in pursuing this, I can find out
where you could purchase the equipment needed.

Doug

Douglas Zaruba
16639 Raven Rock Rd.
Sabillasville, MD 21780
301 241-3494


#8

Doug,

some traditional painters still prefer to mix their own pigments,
and incorporate gemstones into their paints. 

I’m having a little trouble with this. With the exception of lapis,
which is a rock, not a mineral, I can’t think of a single "gemstone"
which, when pulverized or powdered would yield any color
whatsoever…except perhaps off-white…and this is my 32nd year
of grinding them. Lapis was Rembrandt’s ultramarine and the
Pharaohs’ eye-shadow.

Most gems are crystalline substances and owe their color to tiny,
tiny amounts of “errant” elements or compounds held in particular
valence states or color centers within the crystal lattice. These
are destroyed when the material is ground. IOW, ground-up gemstones
yield off-white powder.

Maybe your artist friend is pulling your leg?

Wayne


#9
With the exception of lapis, which is a rock, not a mineral, I
can't think of a single "gemstone" which, when pulverized or
powdered would yield any color whatsoever.. 

IIRC ground-up azurite was widely used to produce the blues seen in
some midaeval paintings. Except now, they are more blue-green, as the
azurite deteriorates to malachite over time.

Lee


#10

the gemstones do not add color the add reflection and texture which
can be achieve via using pumice stone and glass

teri
Silver & Cameo Heritage Jewelry
www.corneliusspick.com


#11

Ilya Schar uses gemstones on canvas. They are absolutely
magnificent. his three dimensional pieces uses precious and
semi-precious stones, the gems are cut, ground, polished by hand and
applied to the canvas as pigment. He uses polished gems as well as
crushed first saw his work in the Fall 2003 issue of GIA’s ‘The
Loupe’

http://www.ilyaschar.com

Marilyn
marilynohara.com


#12

Vincent van Gogh (and many other painters) used malachite green in
his work. But generally speaking, no either earth colors or synthetic
dyes were (and are) the norm for pigments, not “gemstones”.

Brian Corll
Vassar Gems


#13
IIRC ground-up azurite was widely used to produce the blues seen
in some midaeval paintings. Except now, they are more blue-green,
as the azurite deteriorates to malachite over time. 

The traditional ultramarine blue used for St. Mary’s robes was
specifically a ground lapis pigment. This comes from several of the
surviving artists treatises, like Cennini’s “The Craftsman’s
Handbook”

http://www.ganoksin.com/jewelry-books/us/product/048620054X.htm

They also ground Azurite, Hematite and Malachite (which was
specifically mentioned as needing to not be ground too fine, or the
color would disappear).

Ron Charlotte – Gainesville, FL
@Ron_Charlotte1 OR afn03234@afn.org