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[Source] Copper Hydroxide


#1

I am looking for a source for a small quantity of Copper Hydroxide
to be used in granulation. I have googled and not come up with a
source but got lots of on how to make it. Suggestions?

Kay Cummins
Out And About Girls


#2
I am looking for a source for a small quantity of Copper Hydroxide
to be used in granulation. I have googled and not come up with a
source but got lots of on how to make it. Suggestions? 

When you fill in the search bar in Google, then search, click the
"shopping" link at the top of the page:
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep804o

Also, be sure to put the search term, “Copper Hydroxide” in quotes
so you only get hits for those two words together and not copper
and/or hydroxide: http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep804p

Paf Dvorak


#3

Pat, I’ve used your google tips, still looking for a source. Please
note Agricultural products are only 66%. I am looking for 94% or
higher.

** yes there were 2 Ebay sources. Not really looking to buy
chemicals that way.

Kay Cummins
Out And About Girls


#4

ArtChemical.com has it listed as cupric hydroxide
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep804r

Nancy in Ann Arbor


#5

Kay,

How is the copper hydroxide to be used? Fabric dyes. enamel color, or
a patina? The best source for the more pure form would be a small
boutiques maker of paints. They are going to get the minerals and
grind them themselves. If it is not much they might sell you a small
amount. I know Daniel Smith art supplies in Seattle area makes their
own, and grinds large Quantities. Call them and they may have other
sources as well.


#6

Thanks everyone for your suggestions. I was able to track it down
and now have a couple of more sources. Agnes, this is being used in
granulation to copper plate/create a eutectic reaction where the
gold/silver will adhere at a lower temp than melting point. I know
there are other ways to do this, simply was trying to help a fellow
Goldsmith track it down so she could test the technique presented.

Kay Cummins
Out And About Girls


#7

Can anyone suggest supplier for Copper Hydroxide?

Hi,

I’m reading about granuation as a basic silversmithing technique and
I want to try it. That said, I can’t seem to find a chemical supply
house which provides it in small quantities or at reasonable prices.
Can anyone who routinely does granuation suggest a readily available
and reasonably priced supplier for jewelry use?

Thanks in advance,
Andrew Jonathan Fine


#8

Hi again Andrew.

I just realized I screwed up: copper electroforming solution is
mostly copper sulfate, not carbonate.

Oops…

Brian


#9
I'm reading about granuation as a basic silversmithing technique
and I want to try it. That said, I can't seem to find a chemical
supply house which provides it in small quantities or at reasonable
prices. 

To answer your question exactly…

According to Wikipedia: “…easily done by mixing solutions of lye
(sodium or potassium hydroxide) and blue vitriol (copper(II)
sulfate)”.

Label all containers, store where children cannot get at them, wear
appropriate safeguards when mixing & using, inform yourself about
all 3 chemicals’ hazards prior to attempting.

But why do you need copper hydroxide, which you find hard to obtain?
Read below for other solutions (pun not intended but I’ll go with
it):

Neil A.


#10

Hi Jonathan,

Copper Hydroxide? Who’s using that?

Normally, it’s Copper Carbonate. Chrysocolla was the period source.
(Probably) Anyway, copper carbonate is pretty easily had. Copper
electroforming solution is pretty much just CuCarbonate.

You can also just copper plate your balls by dunking them in spent
pickle, and stirring them up with an iron rod. Accomplishes much the
same thing.

Or, for the truly insane, you can just do straight fusion. No flux,
no gimmicks, just pure torch control. (Well, one gimmick: you need
to do it on an open faced ‘beehive’ kiln.)

Regards,
Brian


#11

You can substitute copper carbonate for copper hydroxide in
granulation processes

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#12

Andrew - what I use is finely powdered malachite. There always seems
to be a chipped or nasty cab that deserves to be ground to dust.
Voila - copper hydroxide.


#13
Andrew - what I use is finely powdered malachite. There always
seems to be a chipped or nasty cab that deserves to be ground to
dust. Voila - copper hydroxide. 

Well it is actually copper carbonate hydroxide Cu2CO3(OH)2. It was
used in antiquity for granulation so if you have some you don’t mind
grinding up why not. But Andrew may find it easier to get a hold of
copper carbonate.

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#14

Hi Andrew I asked this question earlier this Summer, so search the
threads. My friend bought it off ebay in a small quantity from a
supplier. not a business per say, but there were other options. If
you have trouble I’ll see if I can help.

Kay Cummins


#15
I'm reading about granuation as a basic silversmithing technique
and I want to try it. That said, I can't seem to find a chemical
supply house which provides it in small quantities or at reasonable
prices. 

Why don’t you use spent pickle to plate copper onto the granules?
But, if you want to buy something, try Blue Fuse from
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep80u8


#16
Why don't you use spent pickle to plate copper onto the granules? 

While it is an easy way to get copper onto the granules it puts too
much copper on the piece. This leads to a reduced surface quality in
the granules after fusing.

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts