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Soldering with acetylene in the UK


#1

Regulars in the US used for acetylene can also be used for
propane… I’ve been using them for 5/7 years… don’t think
that is true for the tanks …in the US the tanks are completely
different… propane doesn’t burn as hot… as ac… seems the
choice in the US is about 50 -50 … forum has discussed this a
couple of times… see the library.

Jim


#2

Hi Allison,

You could try someone like British Oxygen who sell acetylene .
You could also try a blacksmith or an engineering company who
are the sort of people who use acetylene. What would you use
with it? Air or Oxygen? Why do you want to use acetylene rather
than Propane?

Richard Whitehouse
Silversmith & Jeweller

http://home.clara.net/rw/
Email: @Richard_Whitehouse1
UK


#3

Hi, The reason so many Jewelers are using propane is that
acetylene has carbon in it, which makes it really good for
welding steel, making the weld stronger, but contaminating things
like platinum and its very dirty also. That’s why propane or
hydrogen is used so extensively. Bye the way, a commercial
acetylene regulator will fit a propane tank hear in the states,
maybe try that.

Bob Martin
Hoff Jewelers
St. Paul, MN.
USA


#4

Hi Alison. It sounds as though you are wanting to use a torch
that is fed with acetylene only, and self-feeds air. The only
time I’ve seen these is in illustrations in American books. As
you have discovered we do have such torches for propane, but not
acetylene, as far as I know.

I believe that until a few years ago you couldn’t get acetylene
here unless you were actually in business. Simply not available
to the hobbyist, on safety grounds. Changed now, but it’s only
used as far as I know with oxygen.

Many jewellers here use the self-blowing propane torches. I use
propane and oxygen for most of my work, and a self-blowing
propane torch (which gives a bigger softer flame) for annealing
larger pieces.

I’m fairly sure that an acetylene regulator will NOT fit an
acetylene bottle here. All such supplies are best got from a
welding supply house, most towns have one (Yellow pages).

Kevin

#5
  hydrogen/oxy is actually about 400 f hotter than
propane/oxy. but all the other things you say about it (and
everything else, i really enjoy your posts) are true. 

Aw heck, George.

Now I’m gonna have to go dig up that chart. maybe it was BTUs
not temps. Can’t recall. Used to think the same thing too, till
I said as much (H is hotter) and a real good buddy of mine, and
one of the best platinum smiths I’ve ever met, said, to
paraphrase, “Peter, go look at a damn chart for heavens sake.”.
I took his word for it. I DO know that at least the BTU level
for propane/oxygen is higher than for hydrogen, even if actual
maximum flame temp is higher for hydrogen (not sure it is. Got
your word for it, but L.T. for the opposite. Guess i’m gonna
actually have to dig up a book to be sure) Unless anyone here
happens to know the actual numbers? Save me the digging?

Ah. Don’t we just love esoteric numbers?

Peter


#6

FWIW,

Here’s the flame temperatures of various welding/soldering
gases. The temps listed are for a neutral flame.

Gas				Flame Temp 			BTU per Cu. Ft

Acetylene			3087 C   5589F			1451.4
Propane			2526 C   4579F			2480.1
MAPP 				2927C    5301F 			Not listed
Propylene			2900C    5250F			2299.4
Natural Gas		2538C    4600F			Not listed
Hydrogen			2660C    4820F			319.4

The figures listed are from ‘Welding Fundamentals & Procedures’
& the ‘Standard Handbook for Mechanical Engineers’. A statement
in the ‘Welding’ book indicated that the BTU content of MAPP gas
(methylacetylene propadiene (C3H4) was similar to acetylene.

Dave


#7
    It sounds as though you are wanting to use a torch that is
fed with acetylene only, and self-feeds air. 

I have had one of these for about 10 years now. Maybe I got some
oddball setup. but all I use is the acetylene tank, and the
torch is air fed.

   I believe that until a few years ago you couldn't get
acetylene here unless you were actually in business.  

Here in chicago, you can get acetylene in almost any (bottled)
gas supply or welding supply supplier.

I’m fairly sure that an acetylene regulator will NOT fit an
acetylene bottle here. All such supplies are best got from a
welding supply house, most towns have one (Yellow pages).

A regulator is a regulator. It’s just the fitting that makes the
difference. Just get the one that fits the threads of your supply
tank

Mike in Chicago…