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Soldering ventilation and safety


#1

Dear all,

I want to be able to do some basic annealing and soldering. I
struggled with it when I took a class, but I think I can do better if
I’m not worried about other students waiting to use the equipment.

I use a 10 by 12 foot room in my apartment for my work (writing as
well as fiber arts and jewelry). I’m hoping that I could use one of
the tiny butane torches safely. I could install an exhaust fan in a
window and set my soldering station up right in front of it (I would
lower the blinds above the fan to keep direct light out). I could
also set up another fan to draw air in on the opposite side of the
room.

Obviously, I would store fiber arts stuff and other flammables away
from the soldering station, and follow other safety precautions.
What are good heat-resistant surfaces to use under a charcoal block
or annealing pan? Rio sells 12-inch by 12-inch Silquar™ High-Heat
Blocks for $21.50 U.S., rated to a maximum temperature of 2000
degrees F (1093 C) – is that a good choice? What type of fire
extinguisher is best to keep nearby when using butane?

Fran
Zemyna Designs
Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, USA


#2

Fran

Welcome.

What are good heat-resistant surfaces to use under a charcoal block
or annealing pan? Rio sells 12-inch by 12-inch Silquar(TM)
High-Heat Blocks for $21.50 U.S., rated to a maximum temperature
of 2000 degrees F (1093 C) -- is that a good choice? What type of
fire extinguisher is best to keep nearby when using butane? 

The block from Rio you sited is similar to what I use, when
concentrating on soldering it is good to have the extra protection a
larger surface to work on.

On the fire extinguisher, I would use a C or one of the other clean
ones as you will be in the room with it. I have put out fires with
the ABC types and what a mess. On a car or trailer not that big a
deal and on liquids it is my preference, but should you ever have to
use it in the house, that white powder goes every where.

Terry


#3

I use fire bricks under my charcoal and annealing pan as well as
around the sides and back. You can also use ceramic kiln shelves
(especially if you know someone who has broken ones that are no
longer useful to them).

Jennifer Friedman


#4

Fran,

You can get a great soldering surface by buying “kiln bricks” from
your nearest pottery supply house, which should be listed in your
yellow pages. You can buy as many bricks as you need and they are
cheap cheap cheap. You can also buy soldering tiles, etc. Lay the
kiln bricks on top of your soldering table and you have a fireproof
surface.

regards,
Donna Blow
http://dzinesbydonna.com


#5

Hello Orchidland,

Donna Blow mentioned using kiln bricks for soldering surfaces. They
work really well.

It’s been mentioned before, but if a large piece of sterling needs
to be soldered, those soft kiln bricks can be sliced into slabs with
a hack saw, and the slabs arranged to form an “oven.” Three sides and
a top - leave the front open for the torch flame. The heat is
trapped, bringing the silver up to soldering temperature more evenly
and easily. Best to perform this in dim light, all the better to see
the metal color in the “oven.”

Judy in Kansas