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Soldering Question


#1

I just ran across your site and thought you might just have an
answer for me. I have a soldering station that I picked up in a
yard sale. The wires have come loose from the heating element and
need to be reattached. Now my problem is finding a solder that
will reattach the wires, not melt under use (rules out tin/lead I
would assume), and is workable with an iron (I don’t want to use
an open flame and end up melting the very wires and insulation
that I’m trying to attach). Some form of silver solder may work,
but I’m not sure what it’s melting point is or what it would
take (temperature wise) to put silver solder into a liquid
state. Let me add the face plate on the unit has numbers (assume
they indicate degrees Fahrenheit) from 392 to 896. Any input you
can provide would be most appreciated. Wayne


#2

Wayne:

There is a putty-like product available thru auto parts
suppliers which air-hardens and is conductive! I believe it has
metal powder in it. Wish I could remember the name… Look for
a clear plastic cylinder container w/red caps. The stuff is
greyish in color. If you think this might work, let me know &
I’ll check further into it. BTW…how about crimp-on connecters?

Best of luck;
Steve K.


#3

re [Orchid] Soldering question To reattach soldering or thermal
elements to copper wire

(1) First get 2 butt splices for the correct wire diameter .

(2) Next stagger the splices so they do not make a big knot but
rather two little ones like so {___} . After you wrap the
wire and element of the first splice with a Temp resistant glass
cloth tape , then make the second splice and wrap the second
splice with the same thermal setting temp resistant glass cloth
tape. DO NOT USE SOLDER , SOFT HARD OR OTHERWISE . You will need
to go to a good hardware store or even better an electrical
supply house. but its not a big or expensive thing to do . Just
like wiring up a lamp but a VERY hot one which you will be
holding in your hand Please be safe as the hardest part is
explaining to the Doctor how you managed to do something really
DUMB . { I know from personal experience } Respectfully Yours
Robert L.Powell - @rlpowell


#4

Would that gray stuff be called “Liquid Steel”–which is not
liquid at all, but does contain steel in an adhesive base, and is
great for all kinds of permanent repairs, and will buff up to a
nice silvery shine! Sharon Holt


#5
     I have a soldering station that I picked up in a yard
sale. The wires have come loose from the heating element and
need to be reattached. Now my problem is finding a solder that
will reattach the wires, not melt under use....... 

The way to fix that is to use a tube. This can
be either a brass tube salvaged from a ball point pen(1) or one
of those alloy type(2) tubes used in non-solder electronic crimp
terminals. As you found out soldering or welding won’t do the
job. Allow enough slack in the heater leads so that tension
doesn’t build up when the wire heats up or cools. Remember to
check for shorts that can be caused by bare metal surfaces
touching (eg. leads to the bracket of the other lead and bypass
the heat element) when you reassemble the solder iron.

(2.This is the made of same material used in in fork or ring
crimp terminals. Tube crimp terminals are also available but
used usually by/for special applications. If your heter element
has plenty of slack the short crimp section of a fork or ring
crimp should be able to hold the broken ends in place. 1.
Dissolve the ink with alcohol or just burn it off and scour
clean.)

To attach the heat element leads to the power cable use ceramic
twist connectors. They come with the solder iron. If missing
try an appliance repair shop for replacements. Most electronics
shops don’t carry creamic twist connectors.

Don’t go overboard. New solder irons are inexpensive.

Kelvin Mok (klmok@shaw.wave.ca)

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