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Soldering investment, fixtures


#1

Hello all: Has anyone tried any kind of soldering clay to support
irregular pieces during soldering? I’m trying to solder multiple
curvy forged objects together: no good places to place binding wire,
or pin down. I read the recent discussion on Super glue, but if it
gives way before soldering temperature is reached, that wouldn’t
work here.

I’m looking at Rio’s “Water-soluble Soldering Clay”, p 331, Tools;
described as “special fast setting investment clay”.

Has anyone tried it, or something similar? I don’t mind if it takes
some time to set up and dry. If it works, it will still save on the
time spent beating the head against the wall.

Thanks in advance… Lin


#2

Hey Lin

Shouldn’t you be able to use regular water soluble sculptor’s clay,
that dries within a few hours or more and takes very high kiln heat
anyway

dp


#3
    Shouldn't you be able to use regular water soluble sculptor's
clay,, that dries within a few hours or more and takes very high
kiln heat anyway 

How about the clean up issues? The clay might cure around the solder
joints and be a problem to clean up after the soldering. It might be
worth some experimenting with some scrap pieces before trying it on
a good project.

Don


#4

I use ordinary white plaster of paris (POP), as soldering investment
, or some times dental stone plaster (natural) not synthetic, works
well for my kind of work, experiment it and find out if it works well
and suitable for your kind of work.

Best regards to all my fellow orchidians

Umesh Chauhan.


#5

I have used garnet sand - just mix a bit with water to modeling clay
consistency, flatten the surface and press your pieces into it.
You can let it dry some and then solder away. It doesn’t work as
well as using investment plaster but is quicker and you don’t have
to wait for it to dry completely. Jan McClellan


#6

Jan McClellan -

About garnet sand - can you mash it up again and reuse it, or does
it become - I guess fired - and hard like clay?

always wondered…
Ivy


#7

I’ve had occasion to use the garnet sand. I never had too much
success with it while wet, but I have put parts in it while wet, let
it dry with the pieces in it set up the way I needed them, sort of
like with an impressionite board. Then soldered and soaked away the
sand.


#8

Ivy,

  About garnet sand - can you mash it up again and reuse it, or
does it become - I guess fired - and hard like clay?

It’s reusable. Just mash it up. In fact, if you want you can solder
close to garnets (assuming no nasty inclusions) without problems.
I’ve soldered right next to many 3mm garnet beads without many
problems. Occasionally, a bead will break, but not very often. he
red color also did not change.

Dave


#9
 I've soldered right next to many 3mm garnet beads without many
problems.

My tutor used to horrify us during lessons on repairs by using a
mouth blowtorch to melt garnets into glass!


#10

There have been a number of suggestions relating to the problem of
holding parts together for soldering where wiring, clamping or third
arm devices are either inappropriate or not feasible for the
particular problem at hand. In situations where the usual techniques
will not work, I resort to a product readily available to the dental
profession-simply called soldering investment. Plaster of Paris,
dental stone and casting investment can also be used but a longer
setting time will be necessary. The parts to be assembled are
positioned and held there with either sticky wax, a quick setting
acrylic (Duralay brand, another dental item), or even crazy glue.
The soldering investment is mixed rather thick and a mound is
placed on a slab (glass, plastic, or sheet wax). The “assembled
unit” is gently shimmied into the mound and the parts containing the
wax (or other temporary holding stuff) is left uncovered by the
investment to allow the subsequent placement of solder. Also broad
areas not involved with soldering should also be left uncovered to
allow the heating of the metal. After it sets (about 1/2 hr) wet it
down to be able to slide it off the slab. The sticky wax can be
flushed away under running hot water, the other stuff if used can be
burned off (good ventilation ) flux applied and also solder, and
place the unit on a soldering stand. Heat all around and then focus
on areas containing solder. After the solder flows, wait a few
minutes and then place in water container to break down the
investment.

It really is easier done than described and is a very effective
means of doing multiple solderings at one time. HTH Joe Dule