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Soldering a S S backing onto a S S cuff bracelet

Hello All,

Hello All,
I am planning on soldering a s s backing to a s s cuff bracelet 22g, 1 3/4 “ wide that was damaged due to resizing the cuff. It looks like a bad patch up job on the underside of the bracelet. I can’t flatten the cuff out.
My questions are:
What is the best set up to do this?
Type of solder to use?
H, M, E?
Solder on a tripod from under the cuff?
Your advice is appreciated.
Thanks all.

Lulu the first question I would ask is did you make the cuff or is it a repair on someone else’s metal? If you made it you likely know what solders are already used. Using a solder with too high a melt/flow point may damage other solid joints.

I am restoring a similar piece for friend. It is some old South West tourist jewelry that someone else tried to repair with plumbers solder and electrical flux. A bit of a mess. I don’t know that I have any good advice other than proceed with care. These things can be a minefield.

Don Meixner

When repairing where I am not the first, I always assume the worst, and go for E solder, but “plumbers solder” is my very definition of " the very worst case".
Mechanically removing as much as possible, and then treating with acid to remove every trace is my approach so that a decent repair can be attempted, IF I am willing to even try.

Thank you both for your replies. I’m not repairing, this is my mess up. I’m sure I used the graduated solder method when I started the work on this bracelet and “attempted” to resize it. I’m concerned with getting the backing to fit tight enough to the cuff so that the solder will flow. I’ll jump in, swim slowly and hope to make it to land without drowning.
:pleading_face:

ringdoctor
January 31

When repairing where I am not the first, I always assume the worst, and go for E solder, but “plumbers solder” is my very definition of " the very worst case".
Mechanically removing as much as possible, and then treating with acid to remove every trace is my approach so that a decent repair can be attempted, IF I am willing to even try.