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Solder Flow Problem


#1

Does anyone have a cure for stopping tin solder from flowing? We have a
moveable hinge that we try to solder in a hollow tube, the problem we are
having is the solder runs to the other half of the hinge and freezes. We have
tried talc, oil, milk of magnesia and silicon, NO LUCK. Is there a miracle
cure for this problem???


#2

Lpsbmw@aol.com wrote:

Does anyone have a cure for stopping tin solder from flowing? We have a
moveable hinge that we try to solder in a hollow tube, the problem we are
having is the solder runs to the other half of the hinge and freezes. We have
tried talc, oil, milk of magnesia and silicon, NO LUCK. Is there a miracle
cure for this problem???

orchid@ganoksin.com

Try yellow ocher?


#3

Try using graphite from a pencil.


#4

HIya…

Here is a solution for solder flow that I use. Try white out for white
paper. Safer than Yellow Ochre and it copmes with it’s own brush!!! Give
it a try and see howit works for you.

Harry Butterfield
HP Trading Co.


#5

Does anyone have a cure for stopping tin solder from flowing? We have a
moveable hinge that we try to solder in a hollow tube, the problem we are
having is the solder runs to the other half of the hinge and freezes. We have
tried talc, oil, milk of magnesia and silicon, NO LUCK. Is there a miracle
cure for this problem???

Try yellow ocher?

If you use yellow ocher don’t throw the piece in the pickle pot afterwards
as you will contaminte your next pickled piece and nothing will solder.
I’ve heard of using white-out typewriter correction fluid, don’t know if
that would work any better. Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html


#6

The most common products I use are chinese white (available in cake form
from jewelry supply houses) and the more commony available yellow ochre
solution. I prefer the chinese white (it is actually a water color I
think). Engravers use it by wetting their finger, smearing it across the
cake, and transferring it to the object to be penciled onto, or in our
case, soldered.

Does anyone have a cure for stopping tin solder from flowing? We have a
moveable hinge that we try to solder in a hollow tube, the problem we are
having is the solder runs to the other half of the hinge and freezes. We have
tried talc, oil, milk of magnesia and silicon, NO LUCK. Is there a miracle
cure for this problem???

         Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250


#7

At 11:13 31/10/96 -0700, you wrote:

HIya…

Here is a solution for solder flow that I use. Try white out for white
paper. Safer than Yellow Ochre and it copmes with it’s own brush!!! Give
it a try and see howit works for you.

Harry Butterfield
HP Trading Co.

Please,Can you better explain what you mean by “try white out for white paper”?

Ricardo Bronfen
@Ricardo_Bronfen


#8

At 08:55 AM 11/1/96 -0200, you wrote:

At 11:13 31/10/96 -0700, you wrote:

HIya…

Here is a solution for solder flow that I use. Try white out for white
paper. Safer than Yellow Ochre and it copmes with it’s own brush!!! Give
it a try and see howit works for you.

Harry Butterfield
HP Trading Co.

Please,Can you better explain what you mean by “try white out for white paper”?

Ricardo Bronfen
vancox@gold.com.br

I’m not Harry (hairy?) but I, too, use White Out for solder resist. You
know, the stuff you use to make corrections on white paper, sold by BIC and
available in any stationary section of grocery store, drug store, or office
supply store. Works great and you don’t have to mix it.

Susan

C Gems
Original Designs and Period Jewelry
cgems@pipeline.com


#9

I’m not familiar with tin solder, but I use papermate white out as an
anti flux when necessary. Good luck, Mike.


#10

I’m not Harry (hairy?) but I, too, use White Out for solder resist. You
know, the stuff you use to make corrections on white paper, sold by BIC and
available in any stationary section of grocery store, drug store, or office
supply store. Works great and you don’t have to mix it.

Susan

C Gems
Original Designs and Period Jewelry
cgems@pipeline.com

I’ve been told that white out for copies is less toxic than any of the
others. Anyone know if this is true?

Dna


#11

Here are some extracts on solder flow retardants from ‘Cheap Thrills in the
Tool Shop’

Solder flow retardants are best used when heat sinks will not work. It is
usually more efficient and quicker to work with heat control and heat
sinks. One may have a false sense of security with solder flow retardants
and attempt heating methods which may threaten the piece with damage.
Sometimes however one needs a solder flow retardant to prevent a piece
freezing when soldering it, such as with certain chain solderings and
soldering a trigger for a catch in place in the catch (I still would use a
heat sink and speed with this method).

Some people use yellow ochre with water. I find that it has a tendency to
"bleed" into the flux and make the soldering problematic. It is somewhat
better mixed with a little oil instead of water but I find it difficult to
remove from the piece and do not use it.

Some people use a little rouge powder from the polishing machine dust
mixed with a small amount of oil which works well.

One can take a small piece of rubber (vulcanized mold chunk, slice off a
piece of old torch hose etc) and, holding it in tweezers, rub it on the
metal part to be protected while it is hot. The rubber melts on with a
truly nasty smell (use ventilation) and leaves a brown slimy coat on the
metal. This too works well.

Graphite (pencil lead) will sometimes work to restrict solder flow. Spray
graphite (called dry graphite) can be found at automotive stores.

My favorite is Papermate© correction fluid. There are solvent based and
solvent-free water based versions. In my experience the water based version
does not come off the metal after soldering as easily as the solvent based
one which I therefore prefer. I had heard that it contained toxic chemicals
which were released upon heating and wrote to the Papermate company listing
all the metals, chemicals and temperatures that their product would come in
contact with in standard use by metalsmiths. In their return letter no
mention of chemical interactions with the white pigment was made and they
felt the main danger lay in the solvent used: 1.1.1. trichloroethylene
which is as I understand it a mutagen and carcinogen. This leads me to
think that the white material is something inert like tin oxide or calcium
carbonate (chalk). 1.1.1. trichloroethylene breaks down on heating to form
chlorine gas, hydrogen chloride and phosgene gas, all of which are highly
toxic. Their lab ran evaporation rate tests and found that because it skins
over the solvent does not evaporate as quickly as they had thought. It
seems that about twenty minutes after application the solvent will for all
intents and purposes have evaporated. There is however a safety problem
here and it is recommended that alternates to the solvent based material be
used. While we are not discussing large amounts of solvent exposure someone
will at some point use a lot of it at once or all day and chance personal
injury. Potters ‘kiln wash’ might be good too.

I have a suspicion that Papermate® and similar products are mostly calcium
carbonate, what print makers call ‘whiting’ and what the rest of us call
’chalk’. The cheapest source by volume for chalk in solution is probably
Maalox® though I have not yet tried it as a solder flow retardant.

Kaylor uses China White, a standard graphic artists material made mostly
of chalk as an effective solder flow retardant. It comes as a liquid in a
tube or in a dry cake which one uses like a water color cake with a brush
and a little water.

Kelly Clemmer in Calgary uses Papermate® as a .i.resist for reticulation
;on brass. He paints it on in a pattern, gives it more than adequate time
to air out and then reticulates the surface. Where the resist is stays more
or less smooth providing smooth figurative (in his case) areas amongst the
reticulation.

Brain Press
Box 1624, Ste M
Calgary, Alberta, T2P 2L7
Canada

tel: 403-263-3955
fax: 403-283-9053
Email: @Charles_Lewton-Brain


#12

This topic has raised my eye brows for about 3 days now as I read some of the
responses to stopping the flow of solder… I have to say that I take the
utmost pride in my work and I have to give myself a pat on the back for this
particular reason… It is as follows: The best way (I feel) to mask off the
flow of solder is heat control itself… I am sure if you give yourself enough
time to become accustome to the way solder looks just at its flow point, you
will have a better idea of how fast and to where it is going to run… I have
become so aware of what solder acts like that I could probably solder two
pecies of hair together if I had to. Seriously though heat control is your
best freind… Also be sure not to use TOO MUCH solder… I have seen work that
other jewelers have done and you can see the amount of solder they used. I
feel that if you can see the solder blobs after the peice is finished you have
used way to much solder. To put it simply less solder is better… I don’t get
solder spots on herringbone chain any wider than 2mm at the most. Then I see
some chains that come in with 1/4 inch stiff spots in them. There is no reason
for this. It’s all about heat control and the amount of solder one uses…

				Marc WilliamsFrom: 	owner-orchid@proteus.imagiware.com on behalf of Charles Lewton-Brain

Sent: Sunday, November 03, 1996 9:42 PM
To: orchid@ganoksin.com
Subject: Re: Solder Flow Problem

Here are some extracts on solder flow retardants from ‘Cheap Thrills in the
Tool Shop’

Solder flow retardants are best used when heat sinks will not work. It is
usually more efficient and quicker to work with heat control and heat
sinks. One may have a false sense of security with solder flow retardants
and attempt heating methods which may threaten the piece with damage.
Sometimes however one needs a solder flow retardant to prevent a piece
freezing when soldering it, such as with certain chain solderings and
soldering a trigger for a catch in place in the catch (I still would use a
heat sink and speed with this method).

Some people use yellow ochre with water. I find that it has a tendency to
"bleed" into the flux and make the soldering problematic. It is somewhat
better mixed with a little oil instead of water but I find it difficult to
remove from the piece and do not use it.

Some people use a little rouge powder from the polishing machine dust
mixed with a small amount of oil which works well.

One can take a small piece of rubber (vulcanized mold chunk, slice off a
piece of old torch hose etc) and, holding it in tweezers, rub it on the
metal part to be protected while it is hot. The rubber melts on with a
truly nasty smell (use ventilation) and leaves a brown slimy coat on the
metal. This too works well.

Graphite (pencil lead) will sometimes work to restrict solder flow. Spray
graphite (called dry graphite) can be found at automotive stores.

My favorite is Papermate=A9 correction fluid. There are solvent based and
solvent-free water based versions. In my experience the water based version
does not come off the metal after soldering as easily as the solvent based
one which I therefore prefer. I had heard that it contained toxic chemicals
which were released upon heating and wrote to the Papermate company listing
all the metals, chemicals and temperatures that their product would come in
contact with in standard use by metalsmiths. In their return letter no
mention of chemical interactions with the white pigment was made and they
felt the main danger lay in the solvent used: 1.1.1. trichloroethylene
which is as I understand it a mutagen and carcinogen. This leads me to
think that the white material is something inert like tin oxide or calcium
carbonate (chalk). 1.1.1. trichloroethylene breaks down on heating to form
chlorine gas, hydrogen chloride and phosgene gas, all of which are highly
toxic. Their lab ran evaporation rate tests and found that because it skins
over the solvent does not evaporate as quickly as they had thought. It
seems that about twenty minutes after application the solvent will for all
intents and purposes have evaporated. There is however a safety problem
here and it is recommended that alternates to the solvent based material be
used. While we are not discussing large amounts of solvent exposure someone
will at some point use a lot of it at once or all day and chance personal
injury. Potters ‘kiln wash’ might be good too.

I have a suspicion that Papermate=AE and similar products are mostly calciu=
m
carbonate, what print makers call ‘whiting’ and what the rest of us call
’chalk’. The cheapest source by volume for chalk in solution is probably
Maalox=AE though I have not yet tried it as a solder flow retardant.

Kaylor uses China White, a standard graphic artists material made mostly
of chalk as an effective solder flow retardant. It comes as a liquid in a
tube or in a dry cake which one uses like a water color cake with a brush
and a little water.

Kelly Clemmer in Calgary uses Papermate=AE as a .i.resist for reticulation
;on brass. He paints it on in a pattern, gives it more than adequate time
to air out and then reticulates the surface. Where the resist is stays more
or less smooth providing smooth figurative (in his case) areas amongst the
reticulation.

Brain Press
Box 1624, Ste M
Calgary, Alberta, T2P 2L7
Canada

tel: 403-263-3955
fax: 403-283-9053
Email: brainnet@cadvision.com

procedures


#13

At 08:55 1/11/96 -0200, you wrote:

At 11:13 31/10/96 -0700, you wrote:

HIya…

Here is a solution for solder flow that I use. Try white out for white
paper. Safer than Yellow Ochre and it copmes with it’s own brush!!! Give
it a try and see howit works for you.

Harry Butterfield
HP Trading Co.

Please,Can you better explain what you mean by “try white out for white paper”?

Ricardo Bronfen
vancox@gold.com.br

orchid@ganoksin.com

Hi Ricardo,

I know about what is Mr. Harry talking. I don’t know the right term in english,
but in portuguese is: “corretivo para papel branco”. I’ve used it yet. It works.
Sometimes I use carbon or white(or other color) guache ink.

Christo Kiffer
@Christo_Kiffer


#14

At 08:55 1/11/96 -0200, you wrote:

At 11:13 31/10/96 -0700, you wrote:

HIya…

Here is a solution for solder flow that I use. Try white out for white
paper. Safer than Yellow Ochre and it copmes with it’s own brush!!! Give
it a try and see howit works for you.

Harry Butterfield
HP Trading Co.

Please,Can you better explain what you mean by “try white out for white paper”?

Ricardo Bronfen
vancox@gold.com.br

orchid@ganoksin.com

Hi Ricardo,

I know what means “white out for white paper”.
I don’t know the right english term but in portuguese is: “corretivo para
papel branco”.
It works. I’ve used it sometimes with good results.
Try carbon and white(or other color) guache ink for precision soldering.

Christo Kiffer
@Christo_Kiffer