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Small sink in the work space


#1

Yeah! We sold our washer and dryer and my husband is converting the
old laundry area to a work space for me. It isn’t large, but am going
to work with 6x6 feet area. I have a jeweler’s bench and a work bench
all ready. The furnace and water heater is off to the side of this
working space in the same room. There is water since the washer was
here. Should I put in a small sink? I have been and continuing to
look at photos of the workbenches on the orchid site for ideas. Is a
6x6 foot space going to be doable for small soldering and fold
forming? I don’t polish yet nor have a roller, so my work is somewhat
simple.

thx, brenda


#2

I have a sink in my work area, and it is very helpful. I use it
constantly, to clean things, to rinse my metal after pickling and
neutralizing, If you can put a sink in the work area, you will find
it very useful. Alma


#3

Yes if there is space. We have a 12 x 14 approx. and use it many
times a day. Keeps the nasty chemo out of the kitchen too

Louise


#4
Is a 6x6 foot space going to be doable for small soldering and fold
forming? 

Yes, of course it is! I’ve worked in many a small space over the
years, including half of a 60 square foot room. The metals half was
just a little wider than my bench.

So you’ll want to plan carefully, make every inch count, but yes, of
course it will work. I just wonder how you’ll wash the clothes now
that you’ve sold the washer and dryer?

Elaine
CreativeTextureTools.com


#5

I would put in a small bar sink with a small settling tank below. I
recall seeing some that are about the size of a 5 gallon bucket. You
will wonder how you ever got along without one even in your small
space. =)

Gerald Livings


#6

You will never regret having a sink in your work space. If you are
soldering in such a small space, be sure to figure in an exhaust
fan.


#7

Hello Brenda,

In as word, YES, put in a small sink. It doesn’t have to be any
bigger than the typical bar sink. You will enjoy having a source of
water in your work space.

Judy in Kansas, where a few asparagus noses are above ground. That
means the turtles will be up soon!


#8

I added a sink last year to my area because I was using our kitchen
sink a lot. It has been so convenient–so my vote is to add one.

Scott Akridge


#9

A sink is a wonderful idea. Also when you put it in, have a sink trap
installed that is easily openable. Some have a hinged section at the
bottom of the trap curve that will make it easy to retrieve any small
item that has accidentally slipped down the sink.

Janet Kofoed
janetkofoedjewelry.com


#10

My only regret in my studio is that my sink is one side of my 40 ft
studio, and my soldering bench is on the other end. I wished I had
put ina small sink at my soldering bench for it would have saved me
a daily trip to replace my water bowls. I’ve learned to keep clean
water in bottles at my soldering station to compensate for that.

My first sink was the cheap utility sink and I managed to punch a
hole in it when my 25 lb tumbler crashed into it. For 9 months, I
had a bucket under the sink to catch the water. When it was time to
properly finish the workspace, I put in a large stainless steel sink
with a sprayer into a custom-made countertop with shelves. I
deliberately planned it so that my tumblers were next to the sink,
and my ultrasonic cleaner sothat there was very little wasted
movement or hauling of heavy barrels. My old studio was so poorly
laid out, that I would have to haul my big heavy barrel across two
rooms, up a flight of stairs, and into the kitchen. I don’t miss
those days anymroe. Plus the old studio did nothave heat, enough
outlets, one room had no working lights. I shudder to think how many
times my apt would up gone up in flames from the very old wiring and
poor maintainence (my landlord was a slumlord).

Joy, comfortably settled in her customized studio of 10 years.


#11

I garbage picked an old enameled cast iron sink that has sides wide
enough to do my torch work on one side and chemical work on the
other. Love it!


#12
I have a sink in my work area, and it is very helpful. 

And it sure beats carrying buckets from the well.

Paf Dvorak


#13
A sink is a wonderful idea. Also when you put it in, have a sink
trap installed that is easily openable. Some have a hinged section
at the bottom of the trap curve that will make it easy to retrieve
any small item that has accidentally slipped down the sink. 

I visited Hong Kong in '05 and discovered they use bottle traps
instead of p-traps.

I now have bottle traps on both my shop sinks. They’re so easy to
use! I never worry about losing melee or other tiny stuff down the
sink.

Mine look like this:
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep804z

Paf Dvorak


#14
I now have bottle traps on both my shop sinks. They're so easy to
use! I never worry about losing melee or other tiny stuff down the
sink. 

The bottle trap seems like an easy solution for cleaning out a trap,
but I don’t understand how they keep sewer gas smells from escaping
into the room.

Jamie King,
laurasjewelryworkshop.com


#15

Keep in mind that the primary purpose of P-traps is to block sewer
gasses. Catching small stuff is secondary.

The bottle trap you linked to looks as though it does not make an
air seal, so you should also have a P-trap down line of the bottle
trap.

See, I knew watching This Old House would come in handy some day.

Also, if you work in precious metal you must have a settling or
filter tank else you’ll be flushing money down the drain.

Elliot