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Slip roller


#1

Here’s a question for all you ingenious people out there. Have
any of you tried to use a slip roller as a rolling mill? I
found a 12" slip roller for a reasonable price and wondered if
it could be made to roll out ingots of silver and gold. I have
alot of scrap silver (pounds) that I would like to make into my
own sheet and wire. Rolling mills, particularly w/4:1 ratio are
quite expensive from what I could find, exactly how important is
the ratio? John, you seem to be a master at inventing, any input?
Many thanks, Lisa

Lisa Hawthorne
@lisa


#2

Lisa, what is a slip roller? Are you by any chance thinking of a
slab roller?

Marilyn Smith


#3
   Here's a question for all you ingenious people out there. 
Have any of you tried to use a slip roller as a rolling mill?  

hi lisa,

what is a slip roller?

thanks,

geo fox


#4
  Here's a question for all you ingenious people out there.
Have  any of you tried to use a slip roller as a rolling mill?
John, you seem to be a master at inventing, any input? 

G’day Lisa, I know a very little about several kinds of slip; the
kind where you break a leg, the kind used in the ceramics
industry; rocks and mud falling down a hillside; a feminine
undergarment; (My research into that sort isn’t extensive) a
piece of paper with something such as a a receipt printed on
it… However, I’m sorry to dissapoint you but I don’t even
know what a slip roller is, so I can’t really help. Inventing
things you said? Well, I can’t do that without a valuable store
of junk. And if that contained anything remotely like a rolling
mill I’d have one. When I need a rolling mill I ring up my mate
Owen and go and fetch his, and his wife gives me a whole sack of
walnuts to come home with. Nuts to me. Sorry and cheers,

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, 
      / /
     / //\    @John_Burgess2
    / / \ \
   / (___) \
  (_________)

#5

Lisa -

I do not believe a slip roller will be able to take the
pressures needed to thin metal. Do not know about roller
printing, but I doubt it.

It is a handy piece of equipment if you need to bend up sheet
into smooth cylinders - cuff bracelets for instance.

Mary


#6
Here's a question for all you ingenious people out there.  Have
any of you tried to use a slip roller as a rolling mill?  I
found a 12" slip roller for a reasonable price and wondered if

I think Lisa is talking about a sheet metal tool used to form
cylinders I.e. Stovepipe. If so this tool would not be stiff or
strong enough to reduce metal thickness. If you go to Mexico, an
80 MM mill is made there that sells for about $150 US. The one I
bought has spare rolls available and has only a single speed. A
very good buy. Jesse Brennan


#7

I’ve used one as a rolling mill in an emergency. Possible to do
but not a lot of fun and definitly required a fair bit of work.
Contenti in Rhode Island and others had a small mill in the
250.00 range. Charles

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#8

Hi Lisa,

Typically a slip roll is used to form flats into shapes having a
radius, hoops, short tubes, troughs etc. Looking at the rolls of
a slip roll from the end, you’ll notice the a triangle if you
conect the centers of the rolls. Usually the distance between
the bottom rolls & top roll is adjustable. This adjustment makes
it possible to change the radius of the bend & consequently the
diameter of the item being rolled. Also in a slip roll only 1
roll (usually the top one) is powered, the other 2 rolls are
turned by friction (sometimes slipping) between them & the
metal. Since they’re on the outside of a circle, they turn at a
different speed (although small) from the top roll.

If the rolls, pivots & bearings are heavy enough, it might be
possible to convert a slip roll into a rolling mill by removing 1
of the lower roller s. Because of the 12’ width of the slip roll
the rolls would have to be at least 3" in diameter to avoid
flexing when trying to roll metal to a finer gauge. The slip roll
frame, pivots & bearings would also have to be correspondingly
heavier.

  Rolling mills, particularly w/4:1 ratio are quite expensive
from what I could find, exactly how important is the ratio? 

The 4:1 ratio determines the force necessary to turn the rolls
as the met al is being reduced in thickness. It also means tha
for every 1 revolution o f the mill rolls the crank must be
turned 4 revolutions. If you can attach a looong handle to the
mill the 4:1 ratio isn’t important. However to have a mill that
fits in most shops the 4:1 ration is a necessity if the mill is
to be operated by mere mortals.

All things considered, I’d suggest using the slip roll for it’s
intended application & getting a rolling mill (or become very
good with a planishi ng hammer & anvil (bg)) to reduce ingots to
flat stock.

Dave


#9

Howdy Lisa,

I’m not for sure if what you call a slip roller is the same
thing as what I’ve seen, that was called a slip roller. What I’ve
seen is used in sheet metal fabrication. I’ve got a friend that
is a welder, and he uses what he calls a slip roller to make
sheet metal parts for cars, tractors, and other machinery
It will make neat and clean shapes in sheet metal, such as
curves, channels, joints, and seams. Like what you would see in
car fenders and doors. I don’t know if it would take the place of
a roller mill, I’m not sure if it has enough pressure to roll out
ingots, but I think it would do many of the same functions as a
roller mill, like pressing patterens into the surface, and making
a lot of different shapes with sheet metal. I’ve seen mt friend
make some really amazing things with his rollers, but he dosen’t
use silver or gold he uses sheet steel to make cute things to set
in the yard.
I’ve offen wondered if a set up like this would take the place
of a roller mill, because the price difference is so much. 175.00
as compared to 700.00 for a roller mill.
I don’t have room in my small apartment to set one up or I would
have tried it by now.
If anyone else has tried this type of set up I would like to
hear how it worked out for them.

Hope this helps
Jerry


#10

I’m looking forward to the answers . . . I don’t have a clue as
to what a “slip roller” is either.


#11
  The 4:1 ratio determines the force necessary to turn the
rolls as the met al is being reduced in thickness. It also
means tha for every 1 revolution o f the mill rolls the crank
must be turned 4 revolutions. If you can attach a looong handle
to the mill the 4:1 ratio isn't important. However to have a
mill that fits in most shops the 4:1 ration is a necessity if
the mill is to be operated by mere mortals. >>

I had to laugh after reading the “necessity if the mill is to be
operated by mere mortals” After my ONE and ONLY experience with
a mill (although it’s still on my dream list) I would opt to
purchase an electricrical one! I don’t know how mere mortals can
operate these things by themselves . . . ; )