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Sizing Techniques for Bracelets


#1

For years I have been repairing stampado style bracelets and
necklaces; bracelets that are hollow forms that have the top side
stamped out by machines, and the other side a flat plate soldered
to meet, creating a large looking form without the heavy weight a
solid piece would create.

Anyway, these forms are connected to each other with pins
through one end and coming out the other. These pins and holes
wear out, and it becomes necessary to replace them.

My usual technique is to find wear the pin is, either by
educated guessing or occaisionally heating gently to find the
solder stain, marking with a sharp graver, and then drilling
using first a fine drill in my flex shaft to drill through the
pin. I than graduate up in drill sizes until the hole is clear,
and replace the pin.

My problem is this: I find that if I am ‘off’ a tiny bit,
sometimes the drill bit breaks, creating the difficulty of
removing the old bit ( if it hasn’t dropped through). The other
problem is that it takes me too long to do. There must be a
quicker way than my method. \Any ideas??

Thanks, Allan Freilich (waterphoto)


#2

W> My usual technique is to find wear the pin is, and then
W> drilling using first a fine drill in my flex shaft to drill
W> through the pin. I than graduate up in drill sizes until the
W> hole is Wclear, and replace the pin.
W> My problem is this: I find that if I am ‘off’ a tiny bit,
W> sometimes the drill bit breaks,

G’day Allan; Why is it necessary to drill through the pin? If
you were to mark the centre of the old pin lightly with a little
centrepunch (make one from a heavy darning needle and shape the
point to a wide angle for added strength) Drill just through the
bracelet material on one side with a very slightly larger drill
(again, make one from another needle by light forging and gentle
grinding if necessary) then use a needle the size of the pin
with the point ground completely away to carefully drift out the
pin. That way you don’t get to break the drill so easily. When
the repair is done, make a new rivet. My two-penn’orth - if you
haven’t already thought of it! But I have done it with
sterling and even with steel - though not with needles in steel!

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, 
      / /
     / //\    @John_Burgess2
    / / \ \
   / (___) \
  (_________)

#3

Allan, I only know two easy methods for removing broken drill
bits.

The first is the old boiling alum trick, you know, you buy alum
in the pharmacy and put it in water and heat it, then put the
bracelet in and you will see bubbles coming from the drill hole,
except it is slow…

Otherwise, maybe you could use a carbide drill or bur (my
favorite technique). You can easily drill right through the old
drill…

Probably not a lot of help, just my 2 cents worth…

J Everett


#4

Allan, I only know two easy methods for removing broken drill
bits.

Lets also remember boiling in a separate pickle pot with sparex
or equivalent. That works pretty well, although occaisionally
the piece becomes coated red. Remove with cyanide.

Allan