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Sizing rings with stones


#1

I was wondering if anyone can help me with sizing a ring with
blue topaz stones in it. Is there anyway to safely size it
without removing the stones - 3 of them. I also have a ring with
a synthetic sapphire that needs to be sized -will the synthetic
sapphire take the heat of sizing?

Thanks,

Creole


#2

Best remove them.From 400-500F treated Topaz goes white.Some
will go out at 300F.

                                        Mark Liccini
     LICCINI

Gemstone Rough Dealers since 1970 U.S.MAIL
E-Mail: @Mark_Liccini1 107 C.Columbus Dr.#1A
http://www.LICCINI.com Jersey City,N.J.07302
Voice Mail/Fax: 201-333-6332


#3

After cutting and adjusting the size (up or down) wrap the stone
portion of the ring in toilet paper and wet it to protect the
stones. I generally use a commercial preparation called Heat
Shield. Synthetic sapphire will take the heat if it is even, but
why take the chance. Never quench hot gemstones in water or
pickle. Heat sinking stones is a good idea- even diamonds can
have heat sensitive treatments-so err on the side of caution.

Rick Hamilton
Richard D. Hamilton

Fabricated 14k, 18k, and platinum Jewelry
wax carving, modelmaking, jewelry photography

http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton


#4

I was wondering if anyone can help me with sizing a ring with
blue topaz stones in it.

I have a friend who does some sizings and repairs on pieces with
stones that can’t withstand the heat of soldering. He submerges
the stone in a container of water and is then able to solder
the shank with no damage to the stone. He repairs rings that
others have refused to touch. I haven’t tried this myself as I
do not do repairs, but it sounds like a great idea. The only
trick is to get the heat high enough to compensate for the heat
loss at the stone/setting through the water. Try it on a scrap
piece and see if it might work for you. Good luck.

Karen


#5

Topaz ring, wrap the stones in wet toilet paper while soldering.
If the water starts to boil, don’t worry. If it stops boiling,
take off the flame.

Sapphire, don;t worry about it. The heat will not be a problem.

Bill Raby


#6

Creole, If the rings are gold, you shouldn’t have any problem
with either stone, just keep the heat around the joint. If the
rings are sterling, you might want to remove the blue topaz.
Synthetic corrundum takes heat pretty well. Wendy Newman


#7

After cutting and adjusting the size (up or down) wrap the stone
portion of the ring in toilet paper and wet it to protect the
stones. I generally use a commercial preparation called Heat
Shield. Synthetic sapphire will take the heat if it is even, but
why take the chance.

I use paper towel instead of toilet tissue, it doesn’t fall
apart so easily.

Regarding corundum, it can definitely be heated, but be aware
that boric acid or flux will etch corundoms when heated. You can
heat it, but you must make sure there is no flux or boric acid on
it. What is really funny here is that I’ve had jewelers argue
with me on this point, I’ve also repolished sapphires that have
been etched…

JE


#8

I have also done soldering to rings with the stone immersed in
water. Get a small pyrex beaker , fill as needed, and with your
"third hand", position the work to done with the stones in the
water. It really works !!


#9

I was trained years ago, that with gold rings, it is possible to
hold the ring by the stone in the fingers. Apply the heat to the
joint and quench when the stone becomes to warm to hold or when
the solder has finshed flowing. I even show a picture of myself
iridio welding a platinum/emerald ring on my web page. It’s a lot
less messy than using spit wads, “Heat Shield” or “Kool Jewel”.
Silver, however is another matter …

Bruce D. Holmgrain
e-mail: @Bruce_Holmgrain
http:\www.knight-hub.com\manmtndense\bhh3.htm
snail mail: pob 7972, McLean, VA 22106-7972
phone:: 703-593-4652


#10

I was trained years ago, that with gold rings, it is possible to
hold the ring by the stone in the fingers.
SNIP…

Sometimes Bruce, yes, with thin rings, especially thin platinum
rings… :slight_smile:

I learned the same thing and watched my instructor heat a
platinum ring while holding it in his fingers. He then dropped it
into the shirt pocket of his least favorite salesman and watched
it burn its way through to the floor. That salesman never
bothered him again. A crude and rude but effective trick… If he
did it nowadays, he’d probably get shot… :slight_smile:

JE


#11

Years ago when I was working at a wholesaler’s we did a lot of
repairs. A customer wanted some diamonds added to a purple jade
and amethyst ring. We took the jade out but left the amethyst in
the ring to braze the heads on. The amethyst turned clear and we
had never had that happen before. It may have been something
else made to look like amethyst or it may have been treated
stones, but you don’t always know what you have from a customer.
The customer accused us of substituting a cheap copy of jade for
her purple jade! We hadn’t noticed the color change before we
sent it out again. ( Our stonesetter was one of the best, but he
was color blind.) But we did gold ring sizings while we held the
ring in our fingers, because the heat didn’t travel faster than
we were finished with the brazing. Just a comment.

Patricia


#12

Years ago when I was working at a wholesaler’s we did a lot of
repairs. A customer wanted some diamonds added to a purple jade
and amethyst ring. We took the jade out but left the amethyst in
the ring to braze the heads on.

Amethyst does turn clear from heat, I’ve also made this mistake
once, way back when… :slight_smile:

JE


#13

Just a thought on sizing rings with stones while holding in your
fingers…

I have done this many times in the past, but now I prefer to
immerse the stones in water. I have experienced cold solder
joints from holding the ring in my fingers because when the heat
finally does reach my fingers, I would immediately immerse the
ring in water. I have found that it is best to preheat the shank
before flowing the solder, thus allowing the solder to penetrate
the joint better. Since I started using this procedure, I havent
had any rings break at the sizing joint. P.S. I always use hard
solder for sizing. Has anyone else experienced cold solder
joints? Ken


#14

Just a thought on sizing rings with stones while holding in your
fingers… I have experienced cold solder joints from holding
the ring in my fingers Has anyone else experienced cold solder
joints?

I agree completly. I teach soldering a ring while holding it in
your hand as a lesson on how fast heat tranfers from the shank to
the top of a ring. It it a fun trick for someone who has not
done it before. But for practical use it is best to sink the
stone in water or another heat sink to insure a good seam.

One thing I do, if it is questionable if the heat will reach the
stone or not, is apply a drop or two of water to the stone while
holding the ring in a third hand. The natural adhesion of the
water will keep the stone wet while you solder. If the stone
begins to get hot you can hear the water begin to sizzle. If you
are not completly done soldering you still have a few seconds to
complete the soldering or quench imediatly and use a more
aggresive heat sink to complete the joint with a good flow of
solder.

Ray


#15

Just a thought on sizing rings with stones while holding in your
fingers… I have experienced cold solder joints from holding
the ring in my fingers Has anyone else experienced cold solder
joint

What do you mean by a “cold solder joint”?

Marilyn Smith