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Silverblack


#1

Hi all. I just bought some silver black and I’ve played with it a
little (outside with gloves on) but my questions are, do I need to
seal it, if so with what, and can I dilute it? If I do dilute it,
what should I store it in? Thanks in advance! Caitlin in rainy Seattle


#2

Hi Caitlin, I dilute mine with water. This makes a blackish
rainbow effect. I store mine in a jar with a plastic lid, label it
and put it in a dark closet.


#3

Hi Caitlin, I have used Silver-Black extensively and have never had to
seal it. You will notice that if applied to areas subject to wear, it
will rub off. This stuff works best in recessed areas where wear is
not a problem. If you plan on applying Silver-Black to large, exposed
areas it works best if the surface is abraded first. You can also get
darker effects with multiple applications, but when it gets too thick
it will flake.

As for dilution, You could, but I wouldn’t bother because it seems to
generally require two applications anyway. In my own experience, I
would like to make the stuff more concentrated.


#4

Hi all, I am a recent subscriber and lurker until now. A fine artist
for over 25 years, have become interested in metals, iconography, also
I work in a gilding studio. Regarding silver blackening, I would like
to apply a dark finish to sterling rosaries but found when using liver
of sulphur on the wire first, a) I did not get a very black finish
even though I heated the solution and, b) when bending the wire, it
was subject to abrasion and therefore developed inconsistensies in the
color. I also used Silverblack after assembly but discovered that the
abrasion that the rosary is subject to due to use caused the black to
flake and wear. I use fire polished glass beads. Is there any way to
finish these pieces after assembly?

Saille


#5
   Regarding silver blackening, I would like to apply a dark finish
to sterling rosaries but found when using liver of sulphur on the
wire first, a) I did not get a very black finish even though I
heated the solution and, b) when bending the wire, it was subject to
abrasion and therefore developed inconsistensies in the color 

Have you considered using black lacquer? Refer to the Orchid list
about Incralac, for starters. Back in the late 1800’s, a black lacquer
finish on silver was very popular. I suspect it was made with either
Japan or aniline dyes dissolved in lacquer. It’s a dark, but
translucent finish. Check in furniture refinishing books for formulas.


#6

“Regarding silver blackening, I would like to apply a dark finish to
sterling rosaries but found …”

I was going to respond to this before, but knowing how some on the
list feel about “fake” enameling, I didn’t. I use COLORES epoxy
enamel for silver blackening in the background. I also use if for
alot of my enamel background fills too. This works better for me
because it’s permanent, easy to use, and I can produce both glossy
and flat black, if I choose. Colores epoxy is sold by Rio Grande.
You mix it, by weight, using your scale, and bake it in a toaster oven
on the “warming” setting (150) for two hours. You do not have to bake
it, but if you just let it set, it can take a couple days to fully
harden. I just wipe it on with a Q-tip, getting it down in all the
little crevices, and then take a paper towel and take off the excess,
till I get what I want. Bake it, and no sealer or anything else is
ever needed. It’s there for the duration. Epoxy enamels have a range
of uses and are just one more tool in the arsenal. Bud Cravener