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Silver Covered Bottles


#1

Goodmorning All, I have a question. How are those silver covered
glass Perfume Bottles made? I have made an attachment because I
don’t know how to send it any other way. Thank-you for your help
in advance. Susan Chastain

** Attachment Removed **

Hanuman Note:

Dear Susan; You can share the picture with the rest of the list by
using the orchid FTP site. Or just send it to me and I will put it up
for you.

Hanuman


#2
   Goodmorning All,    I have a question.   How are those silver
covered glass Perfume Bottles made?   I have made an attachment
because I don't know how to send it any other way.  Thank-you for
your help in advance. Susan Chastain  

To see the picture please point your browser to:


#3

Hi Susan. I used to do this by electroforming the silver over the
bottles.In some cases, we used Silver electrolityc paint and then
Plated pure Silver over it .For other customers, we would copper paint
the bottles, then heavy copper plate the bottles, then Heavy silver
plate the bottles.Other methods electroforming/Plating are also done
That are slightly different.

Daniel Grandi
http://www.racecarjewelry.com


#4

Susan, I don’t know about the specific bottle you are mentioning but
silver film is deposited on glass beads by the process of fuming and
silver layer is deposited by use of silver foil or leaf.

Fuming is, according to the beadmaking books, uses a tiny ball of
silver about the size of a solder ball that one would use in soldering
a ring shank is first stuck to a quartzglass rod. The metal is heated
in a moderately hot flame until it vaporizes and is deposited onto the
bead which is held in the higher cooler part of the flame, using
welder’s shade #6 eye protection and proper respiratory protection.

I have never done this so I can’t give more details. A better
description is found in “Contemporary Lampworking” by Bandhu Scott
Dunham.

Silver foil and leaf are much easier to use. The molten bead is just
rolled onto the silver which as been laid on a graphite marvering
block then cased in clear glass. I have done this many times and it is
about as easy as any other basic technique and not more dangerous,
using regular AUR92 lenses and good ventillation. A better description
is found in “Making glass Beads” by Cindy Jenkins.

Neither technique can be taught over the internet, so a short
hands-on course in lampworking would be the safe way to approach them.

Geo.


#5
       How are those silver covered glass Perfume Bottles made? 

This particular style–build silver framework, insert hot glass, blow.
There you go!

Barbara G.
@Chris


#6

Susan, I saw the picture of your bottle when you reposted. That looks
like neither the fuming I have seen nor the foil coating I have done.
Both of those techniques would produce a layer much to thin. Too bad,
those techniques would take just a few minutes and your bottle looks
like something which took a good deal more effort.

Geo.


#7

O-K, This is not exactly about silver covered perfume bottles, but it
reminds me of a request I have from a client. She is looking for a
pendant in which she can put some of the ashes of her late hubby. I
think she would prefer silver and I am more into gold and plat. Who
has any ideas? You can post here, or contact me at
JBKJEWEL@USLINK.NET . Thanks in advance.

Jeff Kaiser


#8

The bottle is silver electroformed. Grooves were carved into the
glass, then made conductive and silver electroformed level to and over
the surface of the glass. Then it was fled down, polished and
engraved. Tiffany used a similar technique. There were also a range of
lovely ceramic vessels worked the same way done in the 20’s. Charles

Charles Lewton-Brain
Box 1624, Ste M, Calgary, Alberta, T2P 2L7, Canada


#9

Hi Susan, Paint the design you want on the bottle using metallic paint
that conducts electricity. When the paint is dry, electroplate it with
silver, gold or whatever metal you choose. Neat, huh? Tom
Arnold


#10

Hello Charles, I see we have a disagreement as to the probable
techniques used to form the silver on the glass perfume bottle. My
own experience with similar bottles was doing a refurbishing for an
antiques shop dealer. The bottles I worked with were antiques and
very obviously when closely examined the glass had been blown into
the silver framework. It seemed to me that the silver on this bottle
had been chased and repoussed. I must say though that electroforming
is very possible. This is one of the aspects that I find so
fascinating about metalwork, the curiosity and the question, “How did
they do that?!” Personal note(YAK), just got your photo
video-excellent!!

Barbara Gillis
@Chris


#11

Hello Jeff, I have had the same request. I put the ashes in a locket
and soldered it closed. Have fun. Tom Arnold


#12

Hi, I have another question about the finished bottle. I have designed
a decanter with the Electro-form process in mind. Does the different
expansion coeficency between the silver and glass cause any problems? I
was planning on using Pyrex glass blown into the shape I require, and
forming the silver around it. Many thanks

Brian Saynor :slight_smile:
Metalwork & Jewellery Design
and Multi-Media Artist
http://www.saynor.com
Tel: 07989 386550


#13
   Does the different expansion coeficency between the silver and
glass cause any problems?

Glass workers electroform their pieces all the time. The only time
you have to worry about incompatability between glass and metal is
when you are fusing them together (a process which happens above about
1200 degrees F.). As the glass cools below annealing temperature
(around 900 to 1000 degrees F., depending on glass) it will develop
stress and possibly crack if fused to something with a different
coefficient. Electroforming is done on glass which is already cool and
stable. The adhesion of the two materials is not accomplished with a
heat fusion, so coefficient of expansion doesn’t apply to this
situation.

Hope this makes sense!
Rene Roberts