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Shibuishi and shakudo temperatures


#1

Hello, I am keeping myself busy by making mokume gane these days.
Could someone tell me temperatures I need to keep in mind for
Shibuishi (25 - 30 % Ag - 75-70 % Cu) and shakudo (96 % Cu 4 % Au)
please? Are there any phase diagrams available? Which temperature do
you use for diffusion bonding? Thank you for reading,

Jacques Pinaud


#2

If you intend to remain solid state do not exceed 1435F when any
significant amount of silver and copper are present in the alloys
you are using. Yes there are plenty of phase diagrams availsble fro
the Ag-Cu and Au-Cu systems You can find both of them on the web.

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#3

Hi James,

If you intend to remain solid state do not exceed 1435F when any
significant amount of silver and copper are present in the alloys
you are using. Yes there are plenty of phase diagrams availsble
fro the Ag-Cu and Au-Cu systems You can find both of them on the
web. 

When I get a moment to scratch myself I’m going to test out a
procedure I use when making pattern welded steel.

I use a liberal amount of flux when forge welding steel. My first
attempt at mokume was fine silver and 90/10 bronze, and it worked
(although I think I was very lucky, and it shouldn’t have worked),
just wired the billet, no flux, and a very rudimentary cleaning of
the sheets. I read in Ferguson’s book that this is one of the hardest
combinations, so I had way too much confidence.

I alloyed up a 5% shakudo, and a 25% shibuishi, cleaned up the
sheets, built a small gas forge for the sole purpose of mokume
construction. Wired the billet, heated up the sheets… epic fail. A
gas forge on uncoated metal, just oxidised the sheet. Well it did
make a nice specialty alloy :smiley: I turned it into square wire and made
jump rings out of it (it’s got a nice blueish patina).

The next step for me is to try using the same techniques I use for
forge welding in a gas forge.

If this fails, I will build a small charcoal forge, and attempt to
imitate the procedures used by the Japanese, when they first made
it.

Regards Charles A.