Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Setting?


#1

I am wondering how to acheive a specific setting. There are lots of
tiny balls of silver lined along what would be the top of the bezel.
They look as if they have been pick soldered there in order to hold
the stone in. From what I have seen, this setting seems to be
generally used on large irregular stones. What is this sort of setting
called and how do I do this without heating and cracking the stone?
thanks - Lori


#2

Lori,I think the tiny balls on the end of the prongs are part of the
original casting–I am assuming you are working with a cast setting.


#3

howdee Lori its not a style of setting per se! its a style of
finishing called “milgrain”. it is accomplished be a little turning
wheel located at the end of a push rod and the wheel has little
indentations located in this little wheel. The jeweller/setter then
runs this tool along the very tip of the finished frame/bezel. This
style of setting is usually used in silver/antique ornament kinds of
jewellery. It has been out of vogue for many years and is just now
seeing a revitalzation in the need of this tool and its uses. Do not
use the thickness of the tool/wheel that makes it look like coin
finishing, the milgrain must not detract from the rest of the finish,
but must enhance its appearance, okay on this? gerry, the cyber-setter!


#4

Hi Lori,

  There are lots of tiny balls of silver lined along what would be
the top of the bezel. They look as if they have been pick soldered
there in order to hold the stone in. 

I’ve seen this type of mounting once, but didn’t examine it closely.
However, I’d bet it’s made with bead wire. There’s a wire available
in different sizes that looks like a row of beads lined up next to
each other, hence the name. Actually it’s only 1/2, the top half, of
the bead. The bezel may be made from this & then the stone set in the
normal manner (except that the bezel is more difficult to push over).

I don’t know if this type of setting has a special name or not, I’ve
never heard one. A likely name could be ‘bead bezel’ set.

Dave


#5

perhaps the edge of the bezel was milgrained with a tool?


#6

Could it be a reverse setting?

Cheers from Don at The Charles Belle Studio in SOFL where simple elegance IS
fine jewelry!