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Setting trilliants


#1

I am somewhat of a novice at notching settings. I have 2
trilliant stones that I would like to set on each side of a bezel
set square stone. I would like to use the settings that have a
point rather than a prong at each corner of the stone. I am
totally clueless as to how to notch the corners in the setting.
I have used cylinder burs on prongs and setting burs for round
settings, but these don’t seem to fit the bill. The stones are
around 4mm in size and the settings are 14K. Does anyone know
where I might find ready made trilliant bezels? I’m not that
good at making small ones myself. Frei and Borel makes a
trilliant bezel block, but it’s a little steep. Any suggestions
would be appreciated.–Vicki Embrey


#2

Vicki,

This is one method.

Use the smallest ball bur you have or a small drill if you don’t
have the ball bur, and bur into the corner where your point will
be. Using a hart bur, cut a seat in the ‘v’ prong areas which
are not excavated by the ball bur. The important thing is that
you do not want any metal touching the point of the stone when
you push the metal over. Using an 8/0 saw blade, cut down the
center of the ‘v’ to just above the girdle. Using chain nose
pliers, gently push the prongs towards each other to close up the
gap made by sawing. Repeat the saw-push routine until the prong
is down where you want it. Burnish the tip opf the ‘v’ to close
any gap still showing. If I can get to the prong easily, I use my
pliers to burnish by letting them slide towards the tip of the
’v’ as I sqeeze them closed. If the stones can take heat, it
doesn’t hurt to solder the prong to neaten it up.

I would love to hear any other methods since I have two 6mm
trillion emeralds which I have to set and I’m just a tad nervous
about it.

Good luck
Sharon


#3

Vicki, and Sharon,

Setting trllions is very easy… The first thing to do is get
over the fear factor… Don’t sweat it… Pretend is a marquise
with an extra point… This is what I do…

  1. First make sure the stone fits in the mounting… By this I
    mean you don’t want it to float around in there. It should rest
    on top of the mounting with a good bit of the metal showing all
    the way around…

  2. After you do that take a small drill bit and drill a hole into
    the V (boot)… This hole will act as a resvoir for the point of
    the stone…

  3. Then take a bud bur and clean it and the sides of the boot
    slightly…

  4. Then take a 45 degree cutting bur and cut a small seat… Make
    sure you line up the seat so that you are cuttin into the hole…
    without eliminating the hole…

  5. I personally don’t feel the need to cut down the center of the
    boot with a saw… But to each there own…

  6. Place the stone in the seat and with setting pliers or regular
    needle nose pliers, tighten the stone in place…

  7. now you are ready to clean up the prongs… remember NOT to
    file them to much. !!! Since everyone has there own technique of
    filing (dressing) prongs, I will let that up to you…

  8. Be careful polishing as it is rather easy to get carried away
    on prongs… then they are gone…

  9. Boom you are done… now did that hurt??? Remember the only
    time you should be afraid of something is when you truly believe
    you are way over your head… Marc Williams


#4
  1. Then take a bud bur and clean it and the sides of the boot
    slightly…

Thanks for the lesson. Using the bud bur instead of the ball
makes a lot of sense, especially when you have a particularly
sharp point. I’ll give it a try & let you know how the emeralds
survive.

Sharon


#5

Thanx all for the trillant setting info. I have a bunch of 4mm
white saphires to set and this was great inro… Sharon good
luck with yoiur emeralds!!!

Harry Butterfield
HP Trading Co.


#6

Vicki,

These settings can be a bear for a beginner, so take your time!
I guess you’re talking about the setting with 3 “v” prongs.
After you’ve determined the stones will fit the mounting (this is
usually the biggest problem), drill a small hole about halfway
into each prong at the place where the point of the trilliant
will hit. I use 45 degree setting burrs and inverted cone burrs
to cut the seats. A large 45 burr at an angle can work wonders!
Cut the seats SLOWLY, checking often for fit. I use a hammer
handpiece to set the stones. Before I had that wonderful tool, I
used a chasing hammer and a flat tool I made from an old
fashioned nail.

Good Luck! Wendy Newman


#7

If I remember the original post correctly these trills were
emerald. I would think twice about hammering on them… Actually
I’d make the settings in 18k for malleability. Then too it would
help justify the $ I just spent on a trill bezel block.

Rick Hamilton


#8

If I remember the original post correctly these trills were
emerald. I would think twice about hammering on them… Actually
I’d make the settings in 18k for malleability. Then too it would
help justify the $ I just spent on a trill bezel block.

Rick, Yes we are talking emeralds, and just to make matters
worse, the customer wants them in white gold. I’m waiting for a
break in the mundane repairs so I can concentrate on doing this
job.

Sharon


#9

Sharon
I’m going to suggest 18k palladium white gold sheet
(available from Hoover& Strong) to make those settings from. It
really forms well, isn’t springy and will set off the emeralds
nicely. Frei Borel’s trill bezel block is very nice…

Good luck

RickHamilton
Richard D. Hamilton, Jr
http://rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton


#10

I’m going to suggest 18k palladium white gold sheet
(available from Hoover& Strong) to make those settings from. It
really forms well, isn’t springy and will set off the emeralds
nicely. Frei Borel’s trill bezel block is very nice…

Thanks for the tip, Rick!

I was going to just use Stuller settings, but I like the sound
of “not springy”. I can’t buy any tools right now (new
business=no $$$), but I will definately keep the bezel block in
mind.

BTW, will you be going to any shows this spring in the
Northeast. I would really like to meet you.

Sharon


#11

Rick H.

Please excuse my jumping in here, but I have a few more
questions in re: trillion settings, etc. What gauge(s) of this
palladium white gold sheet do you find form best? And yellow
gold? Do 14 k and 18k require different gauges for the same
settings due to hardness differences? And could you give us all
a quick “lesson” in the use of bezel blocks? (I know there was
discussion of this some time ago and if it’s already been covered
tell me and I’ll check the archives). Thanks.

Rick Martin
MARTIN DESIGNS


#12

Well, bezel wall thickness is a personal preference- a good
start is 1mm. or 18 guage sheet. I usually start with a curved
section- sort of the outer end of a wedge (pie crust?) solder
that into a conical tube, and form the bezel in the block from
that. Practice with some sterling sheet anneal often- and you’ll
be making tapered bezels in no time (you can actually shape them
without the bezel block- that’s what I did with trillions until I
found that shape ;-). I work less and less in 14k but use roughly
the same dimensions for all alloys. Sterling should be thicker-
16 guage.

Rick Hamilton
Richard D. Hamilton, Jr
http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton


#13

Sharon

Really, stick with the palladium gold- the thought of hammering
emeralds into place in nickel alloys really makes me nervous…
I was kinda teasing about the bezel block- sort of my equivalent
of baseball cards- (collect em all!!) I really don’t go to any
shows- I’ll probably go to Providence sometime this spring and
hang with a former roommate who is a costume jewelry designer
(and dig up some tools and stuff). Perhaps over to the cape to
get some interest stirred up in my work (and that of my studio
mates) for the summer season, and definitely do some mid to
late-spring schooner sailing in Boston Harbor. I could meet up
with you somewhere.

Richard D. Hamilton, Jr
http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton


#14

Really, stick with the palladium gold- the thought of hammering
emeralds into place in nickel alloys really makes me nervous…
…meet up with you somewhere.

Thanks for the help. I envy your time for sailing. It’s been a
long time since I’ve done any of that. Hope to catch up with
you. Seems like you know at least something about everything.

Sharon


#15

Thanks for the help. I envy your time for sailing. It’s been a
long time since I’ve done any of that. Hope to catch up with
you. Seems like you know at least something about everything.

Sharon

Don’t bet anything you can’t afford to lose… I really am a
lopsided generalist. There are parts of the field I know little
or nothing about. Engraving, enameling, (and those are just the
ones that start with e…:wink: I just try not to offer advice on
them, except to defer or refer to someone with knowledge.

I take the time for sailing- try not to talk business- usually
I’m busy cleating off something- the schooner is gaff rigged and
no winches relaxation.

Rick Hamilton
Richard D. Hamilton, Jr
http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton