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[Setting] Fishtail effect


#1

I am currently trying to set a mounting 5 stones with the
fishtail effect. I need technical assistance as I have never
used this technique. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.
Sincerly, Robert Moseley


#2

I am currently trying to set a mounting 5 stones with the
fishtail effect. I need technical assistance as I have never
used this technique.

I use two techniques for fishtail heads. With single fishtail
heads I will generally cut each corner into four beads with a
saw. After cutting a seat, there will only be three prongs left
in each corner. The outside prong in each corner is a drone
Remove any burs, polish and set. These settings can also be bead
and brightcut with a single bead for each prong. On rows of
heads, I will generally seperate four prongs total for each
stone with a saw next to the side holes. Seat and set the
stones. Brightcut the metal between the stones. These settings
can also be bead and brightcut all the way around if you wish.
It is important, I think, to be sure that you brightcut between
the stones. I find it a little annoying that in a lot of
catalogs, some of them pretty major, that these mountings are
set up improperly. Good luck!

Bruce D. Holmgrain
Maryland’s first JA Certified Senior Bench Jeweler
@Bruce_Holmgrain


703-593-4652


#3

Hi Robert, If you are setting into a ring that is should type
setting, so that the opening is C shaped with the side exposed.
You start out with a 45 degree baring bur at a angle so that it
forms a lip to slide under. You then rock the bur upright so
the stone sits flat. The fish tail are folded over like a bezel
opposite to the lip.

If your doing double fish tail. ===(0)(0)(0)(0)(0)=== Then
drill in straight and use the fish tails ends like a bezel. You
can also burnish the stones in. Jim @Zimmerman


#4
  I find it a little annoying that in a lot of catalogs, some
of them pretty major, that these mountings are set up
improperly. 

Due, I think, to the difference in time and skill required,
between properly raising beads, cleaning out around them, beading
them over, and bright cutting what remains, versus just jamming
the stones in with roughly raised beads, or sometimes just
shoving the beading tool down on raw metal to create ugly
depressed beads that nevertheless hold the stone in, and then
chopping the remaining metal up with, again, the beading tool. A
lot faster, and easier. And for many consumers, not aware of how
clean and elegant good bead and bright cut or pave setting should
look like, that jumbled fast mess of random shallow beads still
looks bright and glittery… And for the catalog company, it
lets them pay a lot less for their setting work, so the price
points are easier to meet. 'nuther case of “you gets what you
pays for…”

Peter Rowe


#5

Several times I have considered complimenting Peter Rowe for his
contributions to this group. I am simply a co-moderator in a
metal craft group, with the local rock and gem club. I have
worked around jewelry many years in a jewelry repair shops. I
like to say I have 5 years experience 10 times.

Peter’s ability to cut to the core is a talent. His
understanding of the beauty of bright cut and fishtail setting,
says he has a real understanding of the process.

The next time I am in Chattanooga, I would like to meet you.

Thank you for your contributions.

Don Vercellotti,


#6
   Several times I have considered complimenting Peter Rowe
for his contributions to this group.  I am simply a
co-moderator in a metal craft group, 

On the internet? Which one/where do we find it? In addition to
keeping up with the orchid list, as many of you know, I’m also
the moderator of the rec.crafts.jewelry usenet newsgroup.
Another active discussion forum, though with a trace of humility,
I have to say Dr. Asplers little gem, here, seems to attract more
activity than the newsgroup I moderate…

   Peter's ability to cut to the core is a talent.  His
understanding of the beauty of bright cut and fishtail
setting, says he has a real understanding of the process.  

Gosh. blushing. Used to be pretty good at it too. A little
out of practice with those, now. haven’t been able to do as much
bead/pave setting as I used to since a car accident crushed my
left wrist five years ago. still works, but gets tired easily.
So now I just write about it, and hand the actual setting work to
someone else with a better wrist and younger eyes, too.

   The next time I am in Chattanooga, I would like to meet
you.  

I don’t get to Chattanooga much. Can’t actually say I’ve ever
been there. Was in Nashville once, years ago. Now, I live in
Seattle, Washington. Quite a way from Chattanooga. But if you
get out here, look me up.

 Thank you for your contributions. 

You’re welcome. Please remember to read what I mean, not what I
actually wrote… (grin). And forgive the spelling mistakes…
Proofreading isn’t always one of my strengths…

Peter Rowe