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Selling the family silver


#1

Hi All. I’m getting ready to send in a bunch of stuff for refining,
mostly silver. I’m considering including some silver odds and ends I
inherited but don’t care about. This includes platters, cups,
utensils, etc. There’s nothing special, except that I hate to see
all that craftsmanship and utility turned into melt.

Does anyone know of an EASY way to sell this stuff as a group for at
least the market value of silver, to someone who does not intend to
melt it down? Thanks!

Allan Mason
www.silvermason.com


#2
I'm getting ready to send in a bunch of stuff for refining, mostly
silver. 

If you’re doing this because the market is up you better do it
quickly and get paid just as quickly. It’s looking like the market
has begun to turn in the other direction for awhile (platinum down
$600 in the last week, gold down $150 just in this week). I know
this is off your point a bit, but still worth noting.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambrige, MA 02140
@Daniel_R_Spirer


#3

Allan, every time the price of silver leaps, people sell the old
heirlooms–enticed by the monetary value of silver.

This is so sad as the pieces often contain historic and artistic
values that are overlooked in the selling frenzy.

I remember this happening back in the early 80s when the Hunt
brothers cornered the silver market.

Truly hope you find someone to buy your silver items-- though I know
ebay can be expensive, and craigslist can leave you exposed.

What items do you wish to sell? Can you say in this forum?

Cheers,
CS


#4

Try this, look at their buying policies:


#5

Alan,

more often heirloom silver fetches a higher price as replacement
pieces, or from an antiques dealer. With silver on it’s way down to
about $16. 00 an oz. sending ot off to a refiner will get you the
market price x weight but selling the lot as a collectible / or
replacement ware on Craig’s list is worth a shot. It is free, it is
cash in hand and there are safe ways to go about craig’s list
listings. photograph your set in detail against a solid background
with no elements of your household furnishings or floor plan in the
frames. Have the potential buyers email you initially with their
phone number. Call - you can make some intuitive, generalizations
and decisions based on talking to the person so be astute…If it
feels ok, Set up a daytime meeting at a public place (police
stations, fire stations, banks with a security guard on duty - places
with camera surveillance). Exchange the cash for the goods on the
spot. Leave the silver in the car to you have seen the cash in hand.
If agreeing to mail the items to someone outside your local area- use
PayPal Only. After they deposit the total into your account release
the goods. It is all reversible via paypal and you and the buyer are
protected. should anything go wrong, and never give your personal
out (bank account # for transfers, address, etc. In fact
when I have Craig’s list sales I never have them come to my home, but
use a public place or a neighbors house and am waiting outdorrs to
greet them when they arrive- there is no reason that anyone should
ever enter your home)…Questions, feel free to email me off list…

RER


#6
In fact when I have Craig's list sales I never have them come to my
home, but use a public place or a neighbors house and am waiting
outdorrs to greet them when they arrive- there is no reason that
anyone should ever enter your home).. 

Good advice. I buy milk crates from a guy off Craigslist all the
time. He insists on meeting at a gas station that is easy for both
of us get to. His reason: He was selling his mechanics tools and one
guy came and looked at them and told him his price was too high. That
night his garage was broken into and the tools were stolen.

Rick Copeland
Silversmith and Lapidary Artisan
Rocky Mountain Wonders
Colorado Springs, Colorado
rockymountainwonders.com


#7

You should try a reputable auction house. They are expert valuers who
know the real current market value of heirloom pieces. You can set a
reserve price, there is little risk or outlay, and you may have a
pleasant surprise at the end of the auction.

Alastair