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Selling internationally


#1

Hello everybody, I am going to Europe the end of April and with
selling on the internet being the thing to do these days I am
curious about selling internationally. I would like to approach
some shops when I am in Europe with my designs and have just read an
Oct. 2001 article in Lapidary Journal about the difference in
standards per country as far as stamping and purity of metal. It
was saying that some jewelers will make the gold, platinum and
silver content higer over all to compensate for the solder used. I
had no idea that was an issue. Is it possible for an independent
jeweler to sell overseas? Thanks…Ann Madland


#2

Ann,

Of course you can sell your items in Europe. Just make sure you know
the legal standards in assaying for the country you want to sell in.
In general you can’t go wrong with 14 carat.

And it would be a bad idea to compensate your items for the solder
used. It should be the same carat as what you sell the piece as (or
higher).

If you need further details, I’ll be happy to provide them.

Alain


#3

Thanks for the info. Alain. I do have a few more questions…Do you
have to have your metal certified for the metal content and how do
you find out the legal standards per country?


#4

Dear Ann.

This will be a large reply I’m afraid.

Let me start with the situation in The Netherlands (I live here, so
this will be the easiest for me).

The Netherlands:

The legal standards for gold are 916/000 - 833/000 - 750/000 -
585/000

For silver: 925/000 - 835/000 - 800/000

For platinum: 950/000

You (or an importer) are forced by law to have these items fully
hallmarked before selling to the public by an independent assay
office. This can be done by the jeweller you sell to or you can apply
for a responsibility (maker’s) mark yourself at the assay office in
Gouda, The Netherlands.

After that you can ship your goods to Gouda and they will return it
to your country or forward it to any jeweller in Europe you like.
These hallmarks are recognized in the whole of the European union. If
you choose for the first option, then just ship it to the jeweller
(with or without your own maker’s mark) and they will have to go
through that process. That jeweller will have to stamp their own
responsibility mark on the items aswell.

Austria:

The legal standards for gold: 986/000 - 900/000 - 750/000 - 585/000

For silver: 925/000 - 900/000 - 835/000 - 800/000

For platinum: 950/000

The rules are much like they are in The Netherlands.

France:

The legal standards for gold: 999/000 - 916/000 - 750/000 - 585/000

For silver: 999/000 - 925/000 - 800/000

For platinum: 999/000 - 950/000

Again the rules are similar to The Netherlands. There are 30 assay
offices in France.

Ireland:

The legal standards for gold: 999/000 - 990/000 - 916/000 - 833/000

  • 750/00 - 585/000

For silver: 999/000 - 958/000 - 925/000 - 800/000

For platinum: 999/000 - 950/000

Rules will be similar to The Netherlands. The assay office is in
Dublin.

Portugal:

The legal standards for gold: 999/000 - 916/000 - 800/000 750/000 -
585/000

For silver: 999/000 - 925/000 - 835/000 830/000 - 800/000

For platinum: 999/000 - 950/000

Rules similar to The Netherlands. There are two assay offices (Lisbon
and Porto).

Spain:

The legal standards for gold: 999/000 - 916/000 - 750/000 - 585/000

For silver: 999/000 - 925/000 - 800/000

For platinum: 999/000 - 950/000

The system will be similar to The Netherlands.

United Kingdom:

The legal standards for gold: 999/000 - 990/000 - 916/000 - 750/000

  • 585/000

For silver: 999/000 - 958/000 - 925/000 - 800/000

For platinum: 999/000 - 950/000

Again similar rules as in The Netherlands. There are four assay
offices.

All the countries above have strict rules in hallmarking. I don’t
know the particulars for each country, but I’m sure some orchids will
jump in if you need specific

The following four countries have a voluntary hallmarking system.
This means that you can choose to have them hallmarked or not. If you
don’t, than stamp your own marks on them (don’t fraud). If you do
then there are the following standards.

Belgium:

The standards for gold: 833/000 - 750/000 - 585/000

For silver: 925/000 - 835/000

For platinum: 950/000

Denmark:

Standards for gold: anything above 333/000

For silver: anything above 800/000

For platinum: anything above 850/000

Finland:

The standards for gold: 999/000 - 916/000 - 750/000 - 585/000

For silver: 999/000 - 925/000 - 830/000 - 800/000

For platinum: 999/000 - 950/000

Sweden:

The standard for gold: anything above 375/000

For silver: anything above 800/000

For platinum: anything above 850/000

For the four above you must yourself stamp your maker’s mark and the
finesses of the material. These marks may, or may not be recognized
in the first seven countries. If your work is marked in Denmark f.i.
as below 585/000 then you can not sell those items in any of those
seven countries (at least not as gold). Also your maker’s mark should
be registered in these countries.

The following countries do not have any hallmarking system at all.
You are basically free to do whatever you like (don’t fraud).

Germany, Greece, Italy and Luxembourg.

I hope I gave you an impression and that I didn’t make too many
errors.

Ask if anything is not clear to you.

Alain


#5

Contact Nick Savarese at the American Assay & Gemological Office.
(212) 221-6565. This is a branch of the British Assay Office and can
direct you as to how to hallmark your jewelry.

Chris