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Sealing steel/iron


#1

i am working in recyled steel and iron for rings and bracelets etc
i have tried to seal to prevent rust on the skin–heating and
plunge in motor oil//renaissance wax//car wax//krylon//nail polish
etc–none of them are satisfactory–any suggestions???

thanks

polly daeger–email–@Polly_R_Daeger


#2

Knife makers are using a tefflon coating [clear coat] on their
carbon steel knifes. You spray on and cook in the oven.With stands
normal abuse to include salt water.

Jim
omf50@aol.com


#3

I doubt if anything can prevent the iron in steel from rusting.
That’s just the nature of the beast. There are a few things that
can be done to reduce the ammount of oxidation. The first that
comes to mind is wash the piece in warm soapy water (take a shower
with it on). Then wash with hot water and dry. Give it a good
spritz of WD-40 and let it sit on a piece of cloth or paper towel
for an hour or so to let the WD-40 to drain off. Then one final
wipe (unless you like the smell of WD-40) and wear

This has to be an ongoing procedure to prevent rust. Oils and
acids in the skin will vary from person to person so the frequency
of cleaning and oiling will have to be left up to the wearer.

Are you forging from ingots and bars,casting or what. The concept
sounds interesting.

Being sexy is a dirty job, but somebody’s got to do it

Bobert
Carmel,CA


#4
Knife makers are using a tefflon coating [clear coat] on their
carbon steel knifes. You spray on and cook in the oven.With stands
normal abuse to include salt water. 

Sound like some pretty good stuff that could have bunches of
uses. Do you know is brand name and where you can get it?

Nancy


#5

Jim: This spray on teflon coating sounds interesting. Could you
explain further. For instance, what is the product you are
using?

Thanks
Lorne


#6
  I doubt if anything can prevent the iron in steel from
rusting. That's just the nature of the beast.  There are a few
things that can be done to reduce the ammount of oxidation.  The
first that comes to mind is wash the piece in warm soapy water
(take a shower with it on).  Then wash with hot water and dry. 
Give it a good spritz of WD-40 and let it sit on a piece of cloth
or paper towel for an hour or so to let the WD-40 to drain off. 
Then one final wipe (unless you like the smell of WD-40) and wear

I have a feeling that most customers wouldn’t be doing this on a
daily basis. Would anything else be more permanant? (I don’t
work with iron or steel or gold -Mainly sterling) . . . but, as a
consumer of goods, I would be curious to know.


#7

About the Iron and steel- Possibly you could use bluing like for
firearms if you can work with the colors, blue to black to brown.
There is a company in Iowa called Brownell"s Inc, who is a gunsmith
supply. They have cold bluing chemicals that retard rusting very
well. Other than that I’d say nickle plate it.


#8

There are methods for preventing rust on iron & steel products,
but most change the color. Phosphatizing ( zinc & manganese ),
black oxide, bluing ( as in gun parts ) are all used extensively
for this purpose. See the yellow pages under “Platers” or "Plating"
and look for the above terms or others that sound like they may do
corrosion control. Remember that there are also quite a few plating
methods for these materials also that give many different finishes.

Lee


#9

dear ricky

thanks for the answer --have used the gun coloring-but not
satisfied with the results-so am still experimenting

thanks

pollyrd


#10

Polly

When you use cold blue heat the piece up to 110 -120 deg F. and
use cream, not the liquid.

Jim