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Scratches question


#1

When I use white diamond cutting rouge on a pierced silver piece I
get little lines that run out from the open area towards the edge.
What am I doing wrong? Deb


#2

Deb, your buff may be contaminated with a coarser grit. Do you
keep the piece moving from side to side or up and down. The buff is
always going up and can actually cut grooves in the metal if it
isn’t moved.

Marilyn Smith
Midwest America


#3
    When I use white diamond cutting rouge on a pierced silver
piece I get little lines that run out from the open area towards
the edge. What am I doing wrong? 

Deb Keep the piece rotating as you polish. Do not hold it in only
one direction.

Try it, this also solves the same problem encountered when
polishing pieces with flush set gemstones.

Chris Maugham
JA-CMBJ


#4

Deb: It could be that you are not rotating the piece enough
enough in a circular direction as you come toward the edges. Try
that as well as using the outer edge as you go in a circular
direction.


#5
   When I use white diamond cutting rouge on a pierced silver
piece I get little lines that run out from the open area towards
the edge. What am I doing wrong?

Deb Sounds like ‘drag marks’ caused by over-enthusiastic use of
the buff. Make sure that you have removed the worst of the scratches
before you buff and then use the buff lightly and keep turning the
piece to present new angles to the mop head. Hope this helps,

Dauvit Alexander,
Glasgow, Scotland.


#6

Hi Deb,

When I use white diamond cutting rouge on a pierced silver
piece I get little lines that run out from the open area towards
the edge. What am I doing wrong?

Deb what’s happening is this; as you polish against the edge of an
openin g, the cutting media, what ever it is, (white diamond,
rouge etc) particles of the metal & buff build up on the edge.
Then periodically they break of f, for what ever reason, & are
carried by the buff across the surface of the metal your polishing.
Because they’re usually big chunks, when compared to the grit size
of the polishing material, they leave a scratch in the suruface.
The term for this type of action is aggregation scratching
(aggravation would be another good term, bg). The way to avoid or
at least reduce this action is to polish away from th e opening if
possible. If this isn’t possible, try polishing parallel to th e
edge of the opening. The last trick I know of to alleaviate this
conditio n is to use a clean buff, as little polishing media as
possible & clean the edges of any openings frequently to eliminate
any build up.

HTH

Dave
Tucson


#7

Just want to thank everyone for the scratch solutions. I will see
how things go in the studio… Artfully, Deb Rockford, Illinois,
USA