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Saws made from sewing machines


#1
 Scroll saws and saws made from sewing machines have a powered up
stroke as well as down stroke.  

This I can’t resist. How do you make a scroll saw from a sewing
machine? Is there any webpage or archive file on this subject?

The upper arm part is straightforward enough but what do you do for
the under-table part to hold the other end of the blade?

I can get an electric sewing machine from Goodwill for $10, the motor
and speed control is already worth more than that. What I can
visualize about using a sewing machine for a scroll saw is the high
stroke force, the variable speed foot control and a sewing machine is
solidly built.

Kelvin Mok


#2

I want one too! hehe, I have a Sewing Machine that is real good,
maybe overkill, it is a Viking, someone might kill me if I do this,
but this sounds so interesting I just have to figure it out too! I
have no need to sew, will never sew again in my lifetime, clothes is
just to cheap!

Laura


#3

Kelvin,

I’m the one that said scrolls saws and saws made from sewing machines
have a powered up stroke as well as down. I don’t know of any web
pages exist on the subject. One reason people try to make saws from
sewing machines is that the sewing machine already has the mechanisms
that translate rotary motion into reciprocating motion. If you want
to, contact me off line at jastws@aol.com. I don’t think an
unpowered upstoke would be very difficult to design, and in fact, I
designed a piece of test equipment at work that has a powered up
stroke and an unpowered down stroke.

Tim


#4

Greetings:

Could you possibly provide details on how to convert a sewing machine
to a scroll saw? I am seriously interested because generic
lapidary/metal scroll saws are well beyond my financial reach - I am
retired and not bulging with extra funds. Thank you in advance. Best
regards,

Joe Bokor
@Joe_Bokor2


#5

keep your goods one as is and buy unker at goodwill etc to convert
on most of thiers its the motor or shuttle thts shot but the
motion works are usually convertable leo in StL


#6

I bought a sewing machine 5 years ago. I have NEVER used it once.
Shoot. I would rather put the darned thing to good use like sawing
than sewing anyday. It was cheap.

Please someone tell us how. Please tell us how!!

Regards,
Andrea Streicher
Striker Studios
Original Sterling Silver and Fused Glass Jewelry
510-528-3755
www.strikerstudios.com


#7

Hello all, I noticed the posting about using a foot operated
woodworkers fret saw. Has anyone considered modifying an old treadle
type sewing machine? Just curious. Judy in Kansas

Judy M. Willingham, R.S.
Extension Associate
221 Call Hall Kansas State Univerisity
Manhattan KS 66506
(785) 532-1213 FAX (785) 532-5681


#8
I would rather put the darned thing to good use like sawing than
sewing anyday. It was cheap. 
Please someone tell us how. Please tell us how!!

G’day; I just had a look at my wife’s sewing machine, and I just
can’t see how it could be made over without a big hassle. I can
think of how I’d do it if I really HAD to, but it would be much easier
to start from scratch, so long as all you are interested in is it
making good cuts and reasonably easy to guide the saw - and not in a
flash finish! I made a scroll saw with the motor from a sewing
machine and the foot pedal both of which I bought from a sewing
machine repairer for about $10 the lot. I didn’t even have a wood
lathe at the time, so the pulley and crank got made from three pieces
of fibreboard cut out with hole saws and glued together. The frame
was made from a length of 1/2" light metal tube, the table and
baseboard were also made of fibreboard. But I did buy a belt from the
local garage. I put a blower on it made from an old aquarium aerator,
which keeps the dust away from the saw line. Made it about 12 years
ago and it still works well; I often use it. I’m a bit ashamed of
how it looks though, or I’d let you see it! Crude as an ancient
Briton! Cheers, –

John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ